Independent Living Annual Report 2016

State of Illinois
Department of Human Services

Living Independently does not mean doing everything for oneself, but being in control of decisions made about oneself. This is the foundation upon which Centers for Independent Living (CIL) are founded. What sets CILs apart from other organizations is the fact that consumer control exists at every level, where at least fifty-one percent of staff, management staff and the Board of Directors must be individuals with disabilities. With this experience and knowledge, CILs advocate for changes in legislation, provide disability-awareness-related activities, develop technical assistance initiatives regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as amended, and work in a committed fashion to deinstitutionalize or reintegrate individuals with disabilities who can and want to live independently in the community.

A CIL is a private, non-residential, community-based, not-for-profit, consumer-controlled organization that is mandated to provide five core services. The core services are: Advocacy; Peer Support; Independent Living Skills Development; Information and Referral Services; and Transition Services. The new fifth core service, Transition Services, is mandated as a result of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. Many of the CILs already provide Transition Services to individuals with disabilities as they include facilitating transition from nursing facilities to Home and Community-Based Services in the community, activities to prevent individuals from entering institutions, and youth transitioning out of the educational system. With implementation of WIOA, CILs are very well positioned to enhance the services they provide through existing partnerships with local entities that are part of this consumer-centered system.

Staff in CILs serve as role models, helping to demonstrate that individuals with disabilities can be independent and productive. They also offer unique services based on specific community needs. The most frequent needs identified by CIL consumers are accessible and affordable housing and transportation. The support and guidance provided by CIL staff help create informed choice options which provide consumers the confidence to pursue their own independence, e.g. living independently, employment, and realizing their dreams and aspirations. CIL staff assist in enhancing an individual's positive self-image and confidence which is so important in the development of significant peer relationships. Having this positive self-image and confidence can lead to full and equal participation in the community.

Individuals with disabilities have the opportunity to live independent, self-directed lives through the ongoing support of their CIL partners.



Message

Dear Colleague:

On behalf of the Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), we are pleased to share this copy of the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2016 Annual Report on Centers for Independent Living (CIL) in Illinois. This report would not have been possible without the active cooperation and support of the CILs whose numerous contributions make this year's report a vivid record of the independent living philosophy and commitment to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities through the provision of their core services.

In accordance with their mission, Illinois' 22 CILs provided services to 71,076 Illinois citizens with disabilities in FFY 2016. In addition to information and referrals, direct services and mandated core services were regularly provided by CIL staff. Examples of some direct services provided include: introduction to assistive technology devices and equipment; advocacy; individual provider service; referral and training; independent living and life skills training; housing assistance and home modification services; community reintegration; and vocational services. In total, CIL staff provided 95,190 direct service hours to individuals with disabilities.  Compared to last year, this is an increase of 5,061 direct service hours which were devoted to individuals with disabilities.

In the CIL annual federal reports, approximately 43,249 working hours were reported by the CIL participating in local community activities.  These community activities promote disability awareness and advocacy for improved transportation, as well as adequate, affordable, and accessible housing. In addition to providing services to consumers in their community, CILs are also available to businesses and housing officials to educate or review accessibility standards in order to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act as amended, and other Illinois accessibility codes.

Through our partnership with CILs, individuals with disabilities are provided opportunities to achieve and maintain independent lifestyles.  The collaborative efforts between the Independent Living, Home Services, and Vocational Rehabilitation Programs have resulted in important links in the network of services statewide.  We wish to thank CIL staff for all they do for individuals with disabilities in Illinois. 

James T. Dimas, Secretary 
Illinois Department of Human Services 

Quinetta L. Wade, Director
Division of Rehabilitation Services


Independent Living Unit - Program Highlights - FFY16*

  • CILs served 92 of Illinois' 102 counties.
  • Direct Services and Information and Referral contact to consumers increased 3.5% to 71,076.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on boards of directors was 72%.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on the administrative staff (decision-making) was 83%.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on staff was 70%.
  • CILs spent 95,190 hours providing individual services to consumers, an increase of 5,061 hours from FFY15.
  • CILs spent 43,249 hours involved in community awareness and education activities.

*  Percentages and numbers represent information contained in the CIL's annual federal 704 reports (FFY16).


Community Advocacy Project for Minorities with Disabilities and Individuals with Disabilities from Rural Communities

The Division of Rehabilitation Services' Independent Living Unit first awarded Community Advocacy grants to CILs to develop this project in FFY98. This project continues to provide opportunities for minorities, youth and individuals living in rural communities who have disabilities to learn about the legislative process. These opportunities enable leadership development and decision-making skills that enhance their ability to address legislative issues and system changes which impact them and their respective communities.

By engaging in and learning the basic components of advocacy, individuals with disabilities can develop more effective interpersonal and communication skills. Ultimately, participants enhance their own ability to self-advocate and therefore, increase their potential for growth and independence.

Currently, there are six Community Advocacy grants awarded to CILs statewide.


From Institutionalization to Reintegration

Many individuals in Illinois nursing facilities have the capability to live independently within the community. For many years, CILs have worked to move individuals with disabilities out of nursing facilities and other institutions back into community-based independent living situations of their choice. To address this deficiency, the Division of Rehabilitation Services Home Services Program developed the Community Reintegration Program, which awards grants to CILs in Illinois. These grants provide CILs with the necessary resources to offer the start-up essentials (i.e., first month's rent, furniture, cooking equipment, peer support) to help individuals successfully transition into the community.

CILs successfully reintegrated and increased the quality of life for 196* individuals who set community reintegration as a goal, saving the state millions of taxpayer dollars.

* Numbers obtained from the CILs annual federal 704 reports (FFY16).


Personal Assistant Training

In order to meet the growing need for personal assistants (PA), the Home Services Program has partnered with CILs around the State to recruit and train individuals wishing to work as a PA for individuals with disabilities. Upon completion of the training, PAs are added to a registry that is available to individuals with disabilities in the community who may be in need of assistance.

Through contractual agreements, CILs lead outreach efforts to educate the public about the need for personal assistants, educate potential providers about the profession, and provide mentoring with consumers in the community to assist them with the development of better skills toward managing their care. 


Employment Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Across the state, the CILs provide pre-employment and employment services to individuals with disabilities in a variety of ways. There are programs that teach independent living skills for those who wish to enter the workforce and programs that work statewide with youth within the schools.

CILs also work with individuals statewide on career exploration, workplace readiness, self-advocacy skills, outreach, job development, pre-employment services, and assistance with job placement to youth with disabilities.

In an effort to better prepare youth for transitioning into employment after high school, many of the CILs attend Individual Education Plan meetings within the schools to advocate for the student and the family in obtaining needed services. 


Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago (AL)

115 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60607
312-640-2100 (V)
800-613-2100 (V)
888-253-7003 (TTY)

Serving: Cook-Chicago

  • AL transitioned 89 individuals with disabilities out of nursing facilities and into their own homes.
  • As a result of AL's Civil Rights work, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) agreed to provide reasonable accommodations to individuals who use a wheelchair, allowing them to continue attending the CPS magnet school of their choice.
  • AL hosted international groups from multiple countries, exchanging ideas and providing technical assistance in order to equip international visitors and advocates with strategies to navigate and address barriers to independence.
  • AL launched the READY Program, an initiative designed to assist students with disabilities bridge the gap between high school to higher education and employment.
  • AL launched the Disability Inclusion Institute, designed to enhance disability cultural competency, employment, and community participation opportunities for individuals with disabilities.
  • AL had 88 individuals with disabilities graduate from their "Stepping Stones" program, an independent living skills program for individuals transitioning out of nursing facilities. A peer mentoring program is part of "Stepping Stones" and is offered to consumers that have successfully transitioned from facilities.

Achieving Independence and Mobility (AIM)

3130 Finley Avenue, Suite 500
Downers Grove, IL  60515
630-469-2300 (V)
630-469-2300 (TTY)

Serving: DuPage, Kane, Kendall

  • AIM reintegrated nine individuals into community-based settings from nursing facilities.
  • AIM's two certified Senior Health Insurance Program counselors assist with Medicare needs, one of whom specializes in services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population.
  • AIM continues to collaborate with the Northeastern Illinois Area Agency on Aging to provide Options Counseling in partnership with the Aging and Disability Resource Center.
  • AIM was recognized as one of the top 10 Selection Centers for the Illinois Telecommunications Access Corporation Amplified Phone Program for the seventh consecutive year.
  • AIM held an eight-week basic sign language class and maintains a waiting list for future classes.
  • AIM is taking part in the Envision Illinois Accessibility Project in collaborations with the Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

Advocates for Access (AFA)

4450 N. Prospect Road, Suite C8
Peoria Heights, IL 61616
309-682-3500 (V)
309-682-3567 (TTY)

Serving: Fulton, Peoria, Tazewell, Woodford

  • AFA assisted three individuals reintegrate from nursing facilities.
  • AFA provided nine ramps to individuals needing access to their community. 
  • AFA provided Disability Awareness Classes to local area high schools and middle schools.
  • AFA trained all para-transit employees, local law enforcement employees in Woodford County, and electoral judges on Disability Awareness and Etiquette.
  • AFA offered Sessions I and II of American Sign Language classes to the general public.
  • AFA hosted an Accessible Healthcare workshop for consumers and professionals.
  • AFA participated in Emergency Preparedness Training in Tazewell County.
  • AFA staff are participating in the SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery Services training to assist with the increased number of calls received for assistance with SSI and SSDI.

Illinois/Iowa Center for Independent Living (IICIL)

501 11th Street
P.O. Box 6156
Rock Island, IL 61201
309-793-0090 (V/TTY)
855-744-8918 (V/TTY)

Serving: Henry, Mercer, Rock Island in Illinois, Clinton, Muscatine, Scott in Iowa

  • IICIL moved seven consumers to community-based settings from nursing facilities.
  • IICIL hosted an ADA 25 celebration that included information, vendors, entertainment and refreshments. IICIL offered educational information about disabilities.  Miss Illinois, Jaryn Franklin, from East Moline, whose focus is on disability, attended the celebration.
  • IICIL's Seventh Senior and Disability Expo was held at the I-Wireless Center in Moline and generated $3,000 for the Center.  Participants were able to experience firsthand assistive devices for independent living.  Over 40 vendors were in attendance to showcase their products or services.
  • IICIL hosted a Holiday Carnival for youth with over 200 youth and families participating in the Carnival's activities. There were over 40 student volunteers from local colleges and universities assisting with the games and activities.
  • IICIL recognized volunteers from Wells Fargo Bank for their support of the Holiday Carnival at the annual meeting held in March.  The Western Illinois Area Agency on Aging was recognized for its use of IICIL's Interpreter Fee for Service program so individuals who are Deaf could access the Agency's programs and services.  The use of IICIL's program generated almost $30,000 in revenue for the Center.

Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living (IVCIL)

18 Gunia Drive
LaSalle, IL 61301
815-224-3126 (V)
815-224-8271 (TTY)

Serving: Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam, Stark

  • IVCIL reintegrated one individual from a nursing facility into the community.
  • IVCIL staff gave disability etiquette presentations to 141 election judges at the Bureau County Metro Center in Princeton.
  • IVCIL held its 16th annual Teen Summit to prepare young adults for transitioning from high school into life after high school.  Twenty area youth with disabilities participated in the Summit.
  • IVCIL conducted an accessibility review on Freedom House, a domestic violence shelter in Princeton, through a new program entitled, "Envision Illinois."  An accessibility review was completed on a second shelter in Streator.
  • IVCIL became a Senior Health Insurance Program service provider.  Two of IVCIL's staff had extensive training to provide case management for individuals eligible for benefits.
  • IVCIL, through its continued involvement with the Illinois Valley Hispanic Partnership Council, provides outreach services to individuals who are Hispanic, the largest ethnic minority group within IVCIL's service area. 

IMPACT Center for Independent Living (IMPACT)

2735 East Broadway
Alton, IL 62002
618-462-1411 (V)
618-474-5308 (TTY)

Serving: Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Bond

  • IMPACT reintegrated five individuals through the CRP/Money Follows the Person by assisting them in moving from nursing facilities into apartments or homes.  IMPACT provides the appropriate supports, products, transitional costs and environmental modifications so the reintegration is successful.
  • IMPACT provided seven individuals residing in Madison county with ramps for their homes through IMPACT's Ramp Program.
  • IMPACT realized a long-discussed possibility of hosting a one-day self-advocate conference from funding received from a Community Leadership Training Grant provided by the Statewide Independent Living Council.  The conference entitled, "The Facts About Adult Issues for People with Disabilities" was a great success.  Presenters at the conference were well-versed in self-advocacy, covering topics such as networking, finances, and how we live in the community.  There were 100 individuals in attendance.
  • IMPACT continues to facilitate several support groups including the Low Vision/Blind Support Group, the Traumatic Brain Injury Support Group and the Diabetic Support Group. 
  • IMPACT continues to provide technical assistance to architects, units of local governments, non-profit organizations and businesses within the service area to ensure equal access is provided to all individuals.

Jacksonville Area Center for Independent Living (JACIL)

15 Permac Road
Jacksonville, IL 62650
217-245-8371 (V/TTY)

Serving: Mason, Scott, Cass, Morgan

  • JACIL's Nursing Facility Diversion services enabled one individual to avoid long-term nursing facility placement by constructing a ramp at her home. 
  • JACIL provided events and trainings that allowed 2,147 children and adults to understand more about disabilities, the challenges individuals with disabilities face, and the ways in which they adapt.
  • JACIL had 12 individuals with disabilities complete JACIL's Community Leadership series.  With the new skills developed, one individual was recruited for membership on JACIL's Board of Directors and another was invited to the Board of a local organization.
  • JACIL is participating in a collaborative project with Cass-Schuyler Hospice to develop training materials for hospice volunteers on what to present in a "Deaf/ASL-friendly" way.  This will assure Deaf hospice patients can be served by Deaf volunteers and receive hospice services which accommodate the needs of the Deaf patient and/or their family.
  • JACIL continues to have an active role with the West Central Mass Transit District.  A JACIL staff member is an active rider and advocates for the establishment of public transportation in Mason County.

Lake County Center for Independent Living (LCCIL)

377 North Seymour Avenue
Mundelein, IL 60060
847-949-4440 (V/TTY)

Serving: Lake, McHenry

  • LCCIL assisted four individuals transition from nursing facilities into their own homes.
  • LCCIL assisted 56 seniors with severe vision loss remain in their own homes through the provision of independent living skills training and the acquisition of assistive technology.
  • LCCIL's Youth Leadership Transition Unit inspired the Marengo school district to adopt self-led PowerPoint presentations as the standard for all Individual Education Plans for students 14 and over.
  • LCCIL's Youth Leadership Employment Readiness Program experienced a 44% increase in individuals served through this program.
  • LCCIL's personal assistant program experienced a 62% increase in trained personal assistants for this year.
  • LCCIL began providing site reviews on accessibility for agencies that address issues of domestic violence (women and family shelters). The site reviews address physical access, communication and attitudinal awareness to ensure equal access for individuals with disabilities needing services.

LINC, Inc. (LINC)

#15 Emerald Terrace
Swansea, IL 62226
618-235-9988 (V)
618-235-0451 (TTY)

Serving: St. Clair, Monroe, Randolph

  • LINC reintegrated 14 individuals from nursing facilities into the community.
  • LINC sent DeafBlind and media/information technology staff to the CSUN conference to improve staffs' knowledge base of assistive technology and captioning.
  • LINC continues to operate their satellite office located in Red Bud (Randolph County).
  • LINC increased community education services through Facebook and Twitter.  Employment related resources and opportunities and employment success stories are shared on LINC's social media accounts.
  • LINC continues to promote their Braille services within the community and promotes this service on LINC's website.  LINC provided Braille services to two outside agencies this year.
  • LINC produced three short videos highlighting independent living for use with individuals, Board members and the community-at-large.
  • LINC collaborated with Lindenwood University to showcase the history of voting, understanding the voting system, and the importance of voting. 

Living Independence for Everyone (LIFE)

2201 Eastland Drive, Suite 1
Bloomington, IL 61704
309-663-5433 (V)
309-663-0054 (TTY)

Serving: Dewitt, Ford, Livingston, McLean

  • LIFE moved two individuals from a nursing facility into their own homes in the community, with two more individuals in the process of moving into the community. 
  • LIFE successfully advocated with a local public transit provider to establish fixed routes and address proposed changes in order to increase accessibility to a local hospital.
  • LIFE had a 109% increase in consumer information and referrals and a 38% increase in the number of assistive devices loaned to individuals from the previous year.
  • LIFE's Executive Director was given the Florence Fifer-Bohrer Award by the League of Women voters for her dedication to making a difference in the lives of others.
  • LIFE's staff collaborated with Illinois Imagines and developed emergency response cards, which were distributed to police at Coffee with a Cop events.

Northwestern Illinois Center for Independent Living (NICIL)

412 Locust Street
Sterling, IL 61081
815-625-7860 (V)
815-625-7863 (TTY)

Serving: Carroll, Lee, Ogle, JoDaviess, Whiteside

  • NICIL reintegrated three individuals from nursing facilities into the community.
  • NICIL presented disability awareness and etiquette information to students, teachers, parents and classroom aides reaching over 500 participants.
  • NICIL developed a handout entitled the "Myth and Misconceptions of Hiring Employees with Disabilities".  This handout was sent to all Chambers of Commerce for distribution in their newsletters.
  • NICIL  has re-established its relationship with two community colleges in NICIL'S service area and is working to increase disability programs in the colleges. 
  • NICIL also partnered with outside agencies to create disability awareness and programs available to individuals and their families by participating in the JoDaviess County Health Summit Child Fair, with over 1,000 persons in attendance.  NICIL also participated in two senior expos and a personal assistant recruitment event.
  • NICIL worked with several local resource partners offering suggestions on accessibility in their offices for individuals and the general public.

Opportunities for Access (OFA)

4206 Williamson Place, Suite 3
Mount Vernon, IL 62864
618-244-9212 (V)
618-244-9575 (TTY)

Serving: Clay, Clinton, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jefferson, Marion, Washington, Wayne, White, Edwards, Hamilton, Wabash

  • OFA moved four individuals from nursing facilities and provided advocacy services so they could live independently.  One individual was able to remain in their home after modifications were completed.
  • OFA continues to be successful in preventing nursing facility placement by obtaining Social Security Income for 17 individuals and registering 14 individuals in the Pharmaceutical Procurement Program.
  • OFA attended 30 Individual Education Plan meetings with students with disabilities and their families to obtain educational rights and/or transition services.
  • OFA has been a very active member of the three Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs) that cover OFA's service area. The Executive Director is on the leadership team for each of the ADRCs.
  • OFA conducted 50 personal assistant trainings in each of the counties served by OFA.  Two hundred and seventy four people successfully completed the training and had their names placed on the master referral directory.

Options Center for Independent Living (OPTIONS)

22 Heritage Drive, Suite 107
Bourbonnais, IL 60914
815-936-0100 (V)
815-936-0132 (TTY)

Serving: Kankakee, Iroquois

  • Options transitioned two individuals with disabilities from nursing facilities to a community-based setting using the Community Reintegration Program / Money Follows the Person program.
  • Options applied for and received grant funding to provide wheelchair ramps to individuals with disabilities in Kankakee county.  As a result, six wheelchair ramps were provided in Kankakee county and seven wheelchair ramps were provided in Iroquois county. 
  • Options transitioned two youths with disabilities from high school to community college and one youth obtained employment.
  • Options had two staff members receive training to become certified "Matter of Balance" coaches through collaboration with the Area Agency on Aging. 
  • Options' Youth Advocate applied for and received a scholarship to attend the National Center on Independent Living conference in Washington, D.C. with focus on youth and transition services.
  • Options staff provided technical assistance to three businesses, enabling them to complete accessibility improvement projects.  Technical assistance was provided to the City of Kankakee, City of Momence and the Village of St. Anne, who also completed accessibility improvement projects. 

Persons Assuming Control of their Environment (PACE)

1317 East Florida Avenue #27
Urbana, IL 61801
217-344-5433 (V)
217-344-5024 (TTY)

Serving: Champaign, Douglas, Edgar, Piatt, Vermilion

  • PACE moved three individuals from nursing facilities into the community.
  • PACE completed one reintegration this year which required the acquisition of a large amount of technology and assistance because the individual has quadriplegia.  During the move, PACE employed a number of high-tech solutions, including voice activated controls for temperature, TV and an automatic door opener.  Durable medical equipment, such as a hospital bed with auto-rotation was also obtained.
  • PACE staff attended 77 amplified phone appointments where individuals received or were approved for new or replacement amplified telephones.  Having this technology allows individuals to maintain their independence by allowing them to communicate with the world around them.
  • PACE provides technical assistance to individuals looking for housing or home modifications.  This technical assistance is rendered by provision of PACE's "Accessible Housing List" and a local Tenant's Union "Low Cost Housing List."

Progress Center for Independent Living (PCIL)

7521 Madison Street
Forest Park, IL 60130
708-209-1500 (V)
708-209-1827 (TTY)

Serving: Suburban Chicago

  • PCIL's Home Services Team reintegrated two individuals into the community. 
  • PCIL successfully hosted its first Accessibility Job Fair in Forest Park in May. 
  • PCIL was awarded 1st Place for the distribution of amplified phones through the Illinois Telecommunication Access Corporation.
  • PCIL continues its ongoing relationships with several Latino organizations and provides information about disability issues through these relationships and also provides information to the Latino community on its Latino radio station (Radio Vida Independiente 1200 AM).
  • PCIL's Advocacy Director presented to 180 first-year medical students at Rush Hospital in Chicago.  The goal is for medical students to become more comfortable talking to individuals with disabilities about sensitive medical issues.
  • PCIL assisted eight individuals with their appeal regarding Medicare/Medicaid issues.  On some of these, PCIL worked with the State Ombudsman for suburban Cook County and Health and Disability Advocates in order to resolve the individuals' benefit appeals.

Regional Access and Mobilization Project (RAMP)

202 Market Street
Rockford, IL 61107
815-968-7567 (V)
815-968-2401 (TTY)

Serving: Boone, DeKalb, Stephenson, Winnebago

  • RAMP assisted 13 individuals reintegrate back into the community.
  • RAMP's Employment Services Program assisted 45 individuals obtain gainful employment in the community.
  • RAMP's Youth Education Advocates assisted 339 individuals obtain or maintain a free and appropriate education through the public school systems.
  • RAMP presented the iBelong program to 642 students. iBelong provides disability awareness activities for youth with and without disabilities in pre-K through sixth grade.
  • RAMP presented the Teens-N-Transition program to 249 students. This program provides classroom instruction to prepare high school students with disabilities for independent living and employment.
  • RAMP's Education and Advocacy Coordinator and Stephenson County Manager worked with the City of Freeport Community Development staff to develop a grant for downtown businesses with the goal of improving accessibility for all individuals who work or shop in the downtown area.

Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living (SICIL)

2135 West Ramada Lane
Carbondale, IL 62901
618-457-3318 (V/TTY)

Serving: Franklin, Jackson, Perry, Williamson, Gallatin, Hardin, Saline

  • SICIL reintegrated five individuals with disabilities into the community.
  • SICIL assisted a woman with a mental health diagnosis who was at the risk of bankruptcy to establish payment agreements with her debtors, identify local support services, and develop a workable budget to meet her current bills.  With SICIL's assistance, she continues to live independently in the community.
  • SICIL assisted an individual with social anxiety, who has a degree in graphic arts, obtain employment with a major graphic arts merchandise and distribution business.
  • SICIL assisted a veteran with a mental health diagnosis obtain income based housing despite waiting lists.  Previously, he was unable to maintain housing for several years because of a lack of steady employment.
  • SICIL provided independent living skills training and assisted a Filipino individual secure housing and employment at a local packaging company.  She was faced with barriers due to her disability, because her primary language is Tagalog, and because she has a limited knowledge of the American culture. 

Soyland Access to Independent Living (SAIL)

2449 Federal Drive
Decatur, IL 62526
217-876-8888 (V/TTY)

Serving: Macon, Moultrie, Shelby, Cumberland, Clark, Coles

  • SAIL staff assisted seven individuals move from nursing facilities into their own homes in the community.  Three individuals moved with assistance through the Money Follows the Person/Community Reintegration Program (MFP) and four individuals through community services.
  • SAIL services to minorities increased by 20.27% during FFY16.
  • SAIL assisted 83 of 96 individuals receiving Older Blind Services with 86% able to continue to live in their own homes using independent living skills and assistive devices.
  • SAIL created a mandatory personal assistant refresher course, requiring any personal assistant on the referral list over three years to complete this training to ensure appropriate delivery of tasks on the individual's service plan.
  • SAIL provided independent living services which resulted in employment of three different individuals who are Deaf and/or Hard of Hearing.
  • SAIL arranged and facilitated the 10th Annual Shelby County Health Fair.
  • SAIL conducted 25 presentations, four workshops and two disability awareness events in Coles, Clark and Cumberland counties.

Springfield Center for Independent Living (SCIL)

330 S. Grand Avenue West
Springfield, IL 62704
217-523-2587 (V)
217-523-4032 (TTY)

Serving: Christian, Logan, Menard, Montgomery, Sangamon

  • SCIL relocated three individuals from nursing facilities into their own apartments.  One of these individuals relocated from Macoupin County, outside SCIL's service area, into an apartment in Springfield. 
  • SCIL staff assisted with the relocation of one individual from Montgomery county, one of SCIL's four rural and underserved counties. A home modification was required for this successful transition. 
  • SCIL's home modification grant through the City of Springfield Office of Economic Development funded repair to an individual's driveway by installing handrails along the edge of the driveway for additional support.  The individual uses a wheelchair and the driveway could not be altered so it would have a shallower slope.  With the handrails, the individual can now safely navigate to the end of the driveway to board the Access Springfield Para Transit bus. 
  • SCIL performed 80 demonstrations of the ITAC Amplified Phone program at various events and community functions.

Stone-Hayes Center for Independent Living (SHCIL)

39 North Prairie
Galesburg, IL 61401
309-344-1306 (V/TTY)

Serving: Henderson, Knox, Warren

  • SHCIL does not have a Community Reintegration Program.  However, two individuals were referred to other Centers in the area that could assist them, and three individuals were assisted with personal assistants.
  • SHCIL's Community Advocacy Training Program started with six individuals and all six graduated from the Program.  The project chosen for this year was identifying the proper channels for filing a complaint and empowering individuals with disabilities with methods to advocate for themselves. 
  • SHCIL's VIP "Good Gang" volunteered 12 times and was honored for their service by the mayor of Monmouth.  The VIP group also presented a play to the public that was written by one of SHCIL's individuals.
  • SHCIL held a fundraiser at the end of September which enabled the community to experience how individuals who are blind or have low vision dine.  Participants were blindfolded to give them the sensory effect of being visually impaired.
  • SHCIL participates in the Envision Group of Illinois and continues to attend monthly meetings.

West Central Illinois Center for Independent Living (WCICIL)

639 York Street, Suite 204
Quincy, IL 62301
217-223-0400 (V)
217-223-0475 (TTY)

Serving: Adams, Pike, Brown, Schuyler, Hancock, McDonough

  • WCICIL reintegrated six individuals from nursing facilities this fiscal year with five community reintegrations in process at the end of the fiscal year.
  • WCICIL's Loaned Equipment program allowed 46 individuals gain access to assistive technology and equipment needed to enjoy a more independent lifestyle.
  • WCICIL's Annual Americans with Disabilities Act celebration, in combination with the Quincy Senior and Family Resource Center's "Senior Expo" offered an opportunity to provide education and resources to a large number of people representing all ages and disabilities.
  • WCICIL partnered with service clubs and the city parks department to raise the necessary funds to build an all-inclusive playground.  The playground is complete and the fully accessible shelter house is nearly complete.  WCICIL acknowledged the members of the partnership with a presentation of the Accessible Entity of the Year Award. 

Will/Grundy Center for Independent Living (WGCIL) DBA: Disability Resource Center (DRC)

77 N. 129th Infantry Drive
Joliet, IL 60435
815-729-0162 (V)
815-729-2085 (TTY)

Serving: Will, Grundy

  • WGCIL reintegrated four individuals from nursing facilities into their own residences.
  • WGCIL, through over a year of advocacy, was able to stop construction in the Joliet Park District's Pilcher Park due to inaccessibility.  WGCIL provided technical assistance to correct their construction plans.
  • WGCIL continues to secure partners who will support WGCIL's efforts to create affordable, accessible, and integrated housing for individuals with disabilities.
  • WGCIL secured 20 businesses who agreed to host a student with a disability in order to job shadow.  Forty-nine students participated in the disability mentoring day and job shadowed in local businesses.
  • WGCIL continues its membership in the Inclusive Healthcare Coalition and provides input on increasing access to healthcare providers.

Overall Individual CIL Operational Funding - FFY 2016

CILS GRF VII B SSI TOTALS PART C GRANT
AL $296,524 $0 $83,198 $379,722 $248,302 $628,024
AIM $339,965 $22,480 $51,714 $414,159 $22,334 $436,493
AFA $213,438 $53,733 $22,550 $289,721 $19,657 $309,378
IICIL $83,482 $7,065 $40,772 $131,319 $204,231 $335,550
IVCIL $268,974 $0 $0 $268,974 $17,541 $286,515
IMPACT $291,046 $7,065 $23,063 $321,174 $20,073 $341,247
JACIL $146,500 $0 $11,701 $158,201 $141,226 $299,427
LCCIL $125,052 $19,811 $59,490 $204,353 $158,223 $362,576
LINC $159,925 $7,065 $65,305 $232,295 $133,705 $366,000
LIFE $174,419 $49,743 $51,554 $275,716 $99,858 $375,574
NICIL $211,424 $42,509 $21,330 $275,263 $0 $275,263
OFA $401,272 $7,065 $74,538 $482,875 $151,894 $634,769
OPTIONS $93,326 $56,291 $10,250 $159,867 $155,336 $315,203
PACE $191,289 $34,311 $21,054 $246,654 $22,335 $268,989
PCIL $356,868 $7,065 $32,031 $395,964 $0 $395,964
RAMP $150,608 $44,675 $36,243 $231,526 $198,826 $430,352
SAIL $121,168 $0 $21,323 $142,491 $209,139 $351,630
SCIL $276,183 $0 $33,322 $309,505 $22,335 $331,840
SICIL $148,304 $83,734 $48,407 $280,445 $152,919 $433,364
SHCIL $22,972 $0 $43,325 $66,297 $187,961 $254,258
WCICIL/DRC $145,799 $7,065 $5,520 $158,384 $174,863 $333,247
DRC $77,962 $7,065 $63,994 $149,021 $195,820 $344,841
TOTAL $4,296,500 $456,742 $820,684 $5,573,926 $2,536,578 $8,110,504

Age of Consumers Receiving Direct Services - FFY 2016

CIL Under 5 5-19 20-24 25-59 60 & Over Unknown TOTAL
AL 3 56 71 981 337 39 1,487
AIM 0 3 5 72 28 0 108
AFA 2 11 13 118 46 0 190
IICIL 0 5 3 137 187 0 332
IVCIL 2 35 5 44 6 0 92
IMPACT 0 19 20 94 164 6 303
JACIL 0 4 2 26 51 1 84
LCCIL 1 279 100 68 59 0 507
LINC 18 193 8 199 46 3 467
LIFE 0 3 5 58 49 2 117
NICIL 4 78 16 133 23 0 254
OFA 2 79 30 265 64 0 440
OPTIONS 1 4 16 152 208 0 381
PACE 1 14 6 151 273 0 445
PCIL 0 3 19 268 149 27 466
RAMP 5 398 77 402 152 0 1,034
SAIL 0 9 5 131 144 2 291
SCIL 0 15 6 119 37 0 177
SICIL 0 15 51 133 121 0 320
SHCIL 2 33 4 72 17 0 128
WCICIL 3 46 10 88 41 0 188
WGCIL/DRC 7 83 55 44 10 47 246
TOTAL 51 1,385 527 3,755 2,212 127 8,057
PERCENT 1% 17% 7% 47% 27% 2% 100%

Direct Service by Major Primary Disability - FFY 2016

CIL COGNITIVE MENTAL PHYSICAL HEARING VISUAL MULTI-DISABILITY OTHER TOTAL
AL 201 230 866 15 10 0 165 1,487
AIM 15 7 50 17 6 13 0 108
AFA 19 36 63 19 2 40 11 190
IICIL 8 18 71 43 114 78 0 332
IVCIL 22 7 28 1 3 25 6 92
IMPACT 24 14 48 30 162 25 0 303
JACIL 3 4 7 15 49 6 0 84
LCCIL 165 58 24 1 16 243 0 507
LINC 52 159 187 39 28 0 2 467
LIFE 20 1 17 1 66 12 0 117
NICIL 107 18 115 6 6 2 0 254
OFA 88 77 249 4 13 8 1 440
OPTIONS 36 30 143 14 145 4 9 381
PACE 47 14 92 65 218 1 8 445
PCIL 25 52 209 85 26 30 39 466
RAMP 385 248 352 25 17 0 7 1,034
SAIL 22 27 118 22 101 1 0 291
SCIL 33 32 51 4 12 42 3 177
SICIL 92 60 42 6 110 9 1 320
SHCIL 33 9 32 0 3 51 0 128
WCICIL 40 11 71 2 2 62 0 188
WGCIL/DRC 165 16 38 3 5 14 5 246
TOTAL 1,602 1,128 2,873 417 1,114 666 257 8,057
PERCENT 20% 14% 36% 5% 14% 8% 3% 100%

Consumers Receiving I & R and Direct Services by Gender - FFY 2016

CIL NUMBER OF I & R
RESPONSES
NUMBER OF CONSUMERS
SERVED DIRECT SERVICES
NUMBER OF MALES
SERVED DIRECT SERVICES
NUMBER OF FEMALES
SERVED DIRECT SERVICES
AL 2,804 1,487 723 764
AIM 997 108 50 58
AFA 5,550 190 80 110
IICIL 21,777 332 128 204
IVCIL 409 92 56 36
IMPACT 1,014 303 126 177
JACIL 1,127 84 37 47
LCCIL 1,069 507 291 216
LINC 887 467 248 219
LIFE 4,115 117 49 68
NICIL 723 254 133 121
OFA 846 440 244 196
OPTIONS 618 381 136 245
PACE 915 445 170 275
PCIL 1,396 466 236 230
RAMP 13,827 1,034 567 467
SAIL 630 291 117 174
SCIL 1,722 177 89 88
SICIL 540 320 158 162
SHCIL 169 128 62 66
WCICIL 1,367 188 94 94
WGCIL/DRC 517 246 145 101
TOTAL 63,019 8,057 3,939 4,118

County Coverage - FFY 2016

CIL Number of
Counties Served
Number Served
Home County
Number Served
Outlying Counties
Total Percent
Home
Percent
Outlying
AL 1 Cook (Chicago) 1,479 8 1,487 99% 1%
AIM 3 63 45 108 58% 42%
AFA 4 125 65 190 66% 34%
IICIL 3 263 69 332 79% 21%
IVCIL 5 58 34 92 63% 37%
IMPACT 6 238 65 303 79% 21%
JACIL 4 62 22 84 74% 26%
LCCIL 2 327 180 507 64% 36%
LINC 3 393 74 467 84% 16%
LIFE 4 92 25 117 79% 21%
NICIL 5 118 136 254 46% 54%
OFA 13 93 347 440 21% 79%
OPTIONS 2 226 155 381 59% 41%
PACE 5 341 104 445 77% 23%
PCIL 1 450 16 466 97% 3%
RAMP 4 498 536 1,034 48% 52%
SAIL 8 191 100 291 66% 34%
SCIL 5 168 9 177 95% 5%
SICIL 7 141 179 320 44% 56%
SHCIL 3 95 33 128 74% 26%
WCICIL 6 109 79 188 58% 42%
WGCIL/DRC 2 238 8 246 97% 3%
TOTAL 95 5,768 2,289 8,057 72% 28%

ETHNICITY OF CONSUMERS RECEIVING DIRECT SERVICE - FFY 2016

CIL American Indian Asian African American Hispanic Native Hawaiian White Other Total
AL 6 26 848 173 2 349 83 1,487
AIM 0 5 21 8 0 74 0 108
AFA 4 0 42 4 0 139 1 190
IICIL 2 0 59 12 0 258 1 332
IVCIL 0 2 0 2 0 87 1 92
IMPACT 0 0 33 5 1 260 4 303
JACIL 0 0 4 0 0 80 0 84
LCCIL 2 15 45 77 2 329 37 507
LINC 0 6 131 11 2 305 12 467
LIFE 1 1 12 1 0 102 0 117
NICIL 1 1 9 11 0 224 8 254
OFA 1 3 20 2 0 406 8 440
OPTIONS 0 0 35 13 0 327 6 381
PACE 3 4 75 6 1 352 4 445
PCIL 3 6 162 112 1 168 14 466
RAMP 1 5 200 81 1 703 43 1,034
SAIL 1 0 59 0 0 229 2 291
SCIL 1 2 76 1 0 95 2 177
SICIL 0 2 62 4 0 252 0 320
SHCIL 0 0 6 3 0 119 0 128
WCICIL 1 0 10 0 0 171 6 188
WGCIL/DRC 1 4 43 24 0 162 12 246
TOTAL 28 82 1,952 550 10 5,191 244 8,057
PERCENT 0.35% 1.02% 24.23% 6.83% 0.12% 64.43% 3.03% 100.00%

Overall Consumer Involvement - FFY 2016

CIL Number and Percentage of Persons with Disabilities on Board of Directors Number and Percentage of Persons with Disabilities on Administrative Staff Number and Percentage of Persons with Disabilities on Program Staff
Number Total Percent Number Total Percent Number Total Percent
AL 17 25 68% 12 16 75% 29 45 64%
AIM 7 12 58% 2 2 100% 3 4 75%
AFA 5 9 56% 2 3 67% 2 3 67%
IICIL 11 11 100% 8 9 89% 8 9 89%
IVCIL 7 8 88% 2 2 100% 2 2 100%
IMPACT 7 11 64% 2 2 100% 8 13 62%
JACIL 7 11 64% 2 2 100% 7 7 100%
LCCIL 9 12 75% 3.63 3.63 100% 6.63 8.08 82%
LINC 7 10 70% 2 3 67% 6 8 75%
LIFE 9 13 69% 3 4 75% 2.4 4.4 55%
NICIL 3 4 75% 3 3 100% 2 2 100%
OFA 4 4 100% 1 1 100% 2 3 67%
OPTIONS 6 9 67% 2 2 100% 4 5 80%
PACE 7 8 88% 3 3 100% 5.5 6.5 85%
PCIL 8 12 67% 3 3 100% 7 9 78%
RAMP 8 10 80% 6 9 67% 10 21 48%
SAIL 6 7 86% 1 1 100% 8 9 89%
SCIL 7 10 70% 2 2 100% 4 5 80%
SICIL 7 7 100% 3 5 60% 11 18 61%
SHCIL 5 9 56% 2 2 100% 5 5 100%
WCICIL 5 7 71% 2 3 67% 3 4.5 67%
WGCIL/DRC 8 13 62% 2 2 100% 3 6 50%
AVERAGE 7 10 72% 3 4 83% 6 9 70%