Barriers and Strategies


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1. Barriers and Strategies

Barrier

Legislation in Illinois, Public Act 90-0579, which took effect January 1, 1999, allows for minors aged 10-12 to be detained by police for up to hours, and age 13-17 for up to 12 hours, and 24 hours if a crime of violence is involved. While the six hours still applies to municipal lockups and some county jails. This is a direct violation of the Federal JJDP Act.

Strategy

The Commission along with the Department of Human Services continues to actively support proposed legislation to bring the state back in line with the core requirements of the Federal JJDP Act.

Through the use of technical assistance, juvenile officer training conferences, close and consistent on-site monitoring of secure holding facilities and strict enforcement of Federal Core Requirement definitions in the monitoring process, violations can be held below the states de minimus of 270.

DHS ensures that grant funded IDOC and IDJJ monitoring staff is at full capacity and they are continually trained to monitor the expanding Monitoring universe.

That the JMIS reporting system is used by all secure holding facilities and that monitors checked JMIS reports with facility logs to insure accuracy in monitoring.

Barrier

Failure of some reporting facilities continues to be a problem, due to the following reasons: Detention practices have changed. In some facilities that were reporting to JMIS in the past no longer detain juveniles, in some cases facilities that did not securely hold juvenile now do. Also changes in reporting personnel caused by layoffs, promotions and retirement affect the reporting process.

Some facilities report all youths arrested or taken into custody rather than only those youth securely detained. Data received from some facilities is sometime incomplete or questionable.

Some secure hold facilities that do not detain juveniles in a given month, fail to file a report for that month. Finally, training regarding use of eJMIS has not been consistent and frequent.

Strategy

The above barriers can be corrected by continuing to provide technical assistance, constant and frequent JMIS training, juvenile officers conference training and on sight monitoring visits and keeping IDOC, IDJJ monitoring staff at its full compliment.

Finally, DHS has hired another Compliance Monitor to keep up with the expanding Monitoring Universe, to closely monitor, provide technical assistance training to facilities having the above problems and assure that 100% of juvenile detention centers, 50% of the jails and lockups that hold juveniles and 50% of IDJJ youth centers are monitored annually to assure quality compliance.

Barrier

Prior to 1989, Illinois had 649 beds in juvenile detention center causing jails and lockups to hold juveniles in there facilities longer than the 6 hour jail removal requirement. Illinois does not use the rural exception.

Strategy

Since 1989, Illinois has increased its juvenile detention bed space to 1,282 beds through new construction and additional bed space in existing facilities. The IJJC continues to support jail removal through the state by developing and supporting four transportation grants to juvenile detention centers from rural counties located strategically through out the state. This cuts down the amount of time juveniles are held and the financial travel burdens incurred by smaller rural counties with few deputies available to transport.

Barrier

Illinois had chronically lacked detention alternatives and strategies causing overcrowding in detention center throughout the state, especially in Cook County (who at one time had housed 850 juveniles for a period of several months with a 495 bed capacity).

Strategy

IJJC continues to have a strong commitment to develop alternatives to detention

Through out Illinois and as these alternatives are developed more juveniles are allowed to remain in their community in non-secure settings (for detailed more information re: alternatives see plan to maintain compliance under 3C Plan for Removal of Juveniles from Adult Jail and Lockups).