Section 223(a)(7)(B)


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Section 223(a)(7)(B)

  1. Plan for Providing Needed Gender-Specific Services

    • A plan was included in the FFY2009 application that addresses this new plan element. Gender-Specific issues were/are identified as a priority need by the SAG.
  2. Plan for Providing Needed Services in Rural Areas

    • Although not identified as a priority area in the FFY2009 application, the SAG has worked hard to ensure that the rural communities are never forgotten. As a result of past outreach efforts, at-risk youth in rural, urban and suburban communities have benefited from Title II and Title V Prevention funded services. Utilizing a competitive application process the SAG has ensured that existing communities, as well as new communities, have an opportunity to participate in Title II and V Prevention services. To maximize outreach efforts, the SAG uses a variety of notification formats that include: telephone contact, electronic notification and written notification via mail. In addition, members of the SAG participates in a myriad of meetings across the state and plan on utilizing this setting for gathering and distributing application information. In this way the SAG is able to offer grant opportunities to existing and new providers to ensure all facets of the state are represented and youth and families across Illinois have the opportunity to access needed services.
    • An example:
      IJJC continues to support jail removal efforts in rural areas by approving grants to transport juveniles from rural counties to juvenile detention centers elsewhere in the state. Currently, there are four grantees located strategically throughout the state. Certain parts of the state are three or four hours from a detention center. Without transportation programs county sheriff's departments would have the responsibility of transporting minors for the detention hearings. One or two deputies could be occupied for their entire shift. A number of rural counties may only have two deputies working at one time. The transportation grants help offset this expense and ensure the youth can be held in a juvenile detention center, as opposed to county jail, and still be present for a detention hearing.
  3. Plan for Providing Needed Mental Health Services

    • A plan was included in the FFY2009 application that addresses this new plan element. Mental Health issues were/are identified as a priority need by the SAG.

Although the Juvenile Justice Needs statements have not changed, additional information has been obtained to help support two of the needs. Further, the needs statements have been re-prioritized for the coming year as depicted below.

  1. Reduce the Rate of Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC)
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application.
  2. Develop Alternatives to Secure Detention throughout the State
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application.
  3. Access to Counsel
    Public Act 95-0846 was signed in to law on August 15, 2008 and became effective on January 1, 2009. This law provides that the court shall cause counsel to be appointed at the time a petition is filed, and that a detention or shelter care hearing cannot be held until the minor has had an adequate opportunity to consult with counsel. This new law allows the defense attorney adequate time to meet and interview the minor and family prior to the detention hearing to provide the best options and outcome for the juvenile.

    The Juvenile Justice Initiative, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation's Models For Change Initiative, The Children and Family Justice Center of Northwestern School of Law, The Law Office of the Cook County Public Defender, and the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority are all working together to help implement the early access to counsel in PA 95-086 through distribution of materials, meetings, and technical assistance. The working group has held meetings across the state and is working with individual jurisdictions on implementation.

  4. Monitor Female Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System and Support Gender-Specific Programs
    In May 2009 the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission funded and analysis of the treatment needs of females and the juvenile justice system. The report summary indicates: Girls experience risk factors that may increase their involvement in delinquency. The report provides an overview on data available on individual, family, and school risk factors for girls in Illinois.

    In general, Illinois girls' arrests, admissions to detention, and commitment to corrections were more likely than boys' to be for less serious offenses. At all stages of the Illinois juvenile justice system, gender discrepancies were present.

    The report also analyzed current national and local girls programming to identify best practice and model approaches. The SAG intends to utilize the results of this study to inform the next steps in addressing this issue in Illinois.
  5. Support the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application.
  6. Improve the State's Data Collection and Analysis Efforts
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application.
  7. Monitor the Prevalence of Mental Health Disorders in the Juvenile Justice System and Support Programming to Address Needs
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application.
  8. Continue the State's Efforts to Improve Jail Removal Strategies
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application.
  9. Focus Attention on the Issue of Substance Abuse Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery
    There have been no changes to this priority statement since the submission of the FFY 2009 application. Below is updated 2007 data received by the Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, 25,981 substance abuse services were provided to 11,536 youth 10 to 16 years old during the 2007 fiscal year. This represents a rate of 919 for every 100,000 youth age 10 to 16.

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