Girls and Other Offenses


Previous - Next


Girls and Other Offenses

A higher proportion of girls' arrests, admissions to detention, and commitments to corrections were for disorderly conduct and mob action than boys'.

While boys have higher rates of offending across all offense categories, girls had greater involvement in the juvenile justice system for offenses designated as "other" which include, but are not limited to, disorderly conduct, traffic offenses (such as driving on a suspended license, reckless driving, or driving under the influence), gambling, issuance of a warrant, and cruelty to animals.

Arrests

Other offenses accounted for 22 percent of girls' arrests (n=2,327), and 19 percent of boys' arrests (n=7,273) in 2007. Among other offenses, girls' arrests were included disorderly conduct (n=540, or 23 percent), mob action (n=201, or 9 percent), and local ordinance violations (n=1,051, or 45 percent). Literature shows that deportment arrests, such as disorderly conduct, have increased over the years as a result of "zero tolerance" policies. These policies now funnel minor fights and disturbances into the juvenile justice system as opposed to resolving them without law enforcement as in the past.(19)

Admissions to detention

Girls' admissions to detention less often involved other offenses than boys-13 percent (n=346), compared to 16 percent for boys (n=2,080) in 2007. However, girls' admissions to detention more often were for disorderly conduct or mob action than boys'.

Commitments to corrections

In FY04, three girls and zero boys were committed to corrections for disorderly conduct. Two of the girls were committed for felonies (67 percent) and one girl was committed for a misdemeanor (33 percent).


Previous - Next