Commitments to Corrections for Person Offenses


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Commitments to corrections for person offenses

Decisions to commit a juvenile to corrections involve a number of factors in addition to the presenting offense. Absent from this analysis of corrections commitments are data pertaining to previous offenses or other circumstances that may play a part in commitment decisions.

Girls' commitments to corrections were more likely than boys to be for person offenses in FY04. Thirty-eight percent of girls' (n=74) and 27 percent of boys' overall commitments were for person offenses.

Most girls' person offense commitments were for battery (n=64 or 86 percent). The proportion of girls' commitments for battery was higher than boys (n=241 or 58 percent). Table 3 shows the type of person offense commitments by gender and class for fiscal year 2004.

Table 3
Person offense commitments by type, gender, and class, FY04

Person offense type Girls Boys
Misdemeanor Felony Misdemeanor Felony
Aggravated assault 1
(100%)
0
(0%)
10
(100%)
0
(0%)
Battery 29
(45%)
35
(55%)
59
(24%)
182
(76%)
Invasion/Hijacking
(Home and vehicle)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
26
(100%)
Kidnapping 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
3
(100%)
Other person offenses 0
(0%)
4
(100%)
2
(10%)
19
(90%)
Robbery 0
(0%)
5
(100%)
0
(0%)
113
(100%)
Total 30
(41%)
44
(59%)
71
(17%)
343
(83%)

Source: Illinois Department of Corrections

While the proportion of felony battery commitments was high for both boys (n=182 or 76 percent) and girls (n=35 or 55 percent), girls had a higher proportion of misdemeanor battery commitments (n=29 or 45 percent) than their male counterparts (n=59 or 24 percent). Figure 18 shows the proportion of IDOC commitments for battery by offense class and gender for FY04.

Figure 18
Proportion of IDOC commitments for battery by class and gender, FY04

Clustered Column: Boys vs Girls, Misdemeanor vs Felony

Felony
battery
Misdemeanor
battery
Boys 76 24
Girls 55 45

Source: Illinois Department of Corrections

Boys' commitments were more likely to be for robbery than girls. Robbery accounted for 28 percent of boys' commitments for offenses against a person (n=113), compared to 7 percent of girls' commitments for offenses against a person (n=5).

Commitments to corrections for misdemeanor offenses against a person continue to support that girls were involved with the juvenile justice system for less serious offenses when compared to boys.

The difference between boys' and girls' commitments to corrections for misdemeanor and felony person offenses in 2004 is statistically significant. A Chi-Square test of association was used to analyze gender and offense class associations. This test found a significant association between gender and class, with girls having more commitments for misdemeanors than expected (?2 = 20.93, df = 1, p<.001). Further statistical analyses examining gender differences are discussed later. These analyses found a significant difference between the proportion of misdemeanor commitments between girls and boys.


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