December 17th's Grant Informational Conference for the Home Visiting Programs RFP's

Document sent by Molly A. Hobbie, Certified Shorthand Reporter and Notary Public (pdf)

The rest of the webpage is the text from the above document without the page numbers and line numbers for ease of reading.


HOME VISITING
GRANT INFORMATION
BIDDERS CONFERENCE

Bidders Conference held on December 17, 2008,
at the Offices of the Illinois Department of Public
Health, 535 West Jefferson Street, Springfield,
Illinois, scheduled for the hour of 2:30 P.M.


PRESENT:

  • MR. RALPH SCHUBERT
  • MS. ANDREA PALMER
  • DR. JEANNE ANDERSON
  • MS. CLARE ELDREDGE
  • Molly A. Hobbie, CSR
    GOLEMBECK REPORTING SERVICE
    Connie S. Golembeck, Owner
    (217) 523-8244
    (217) 632-8244

MR. SCHUBERT:

Good afternoon everyone. This is Ralph Schubert. I'm the Associate Director for Program Planning and Development in the Division of Community Health and Prevention. I'm going to introduce the rest of the panelists in just a moment.

I want to welcome you to our audio grant information conference for our request for proposals for expansion of initiation and expansion of home visiting programs. Before I get too far into this, let me introduce everybody else who is sitting around the table. First of all, I'm going to introduce Dr. Jeanne Anderson from the Nurse-Family Partnership.

DR. ANDERSON:
Hi, everybody.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Clare Eldredge from the Ounce of Prevention Fund.

MS. ELDREDGE:
Good afternoon.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Andrea Palmer from the Division of Community Health and Prevention.

MS. PALMER:
Hello.

MR. SCHUBERT:
And everything that you say is being taken down by Molly Hobbie who is here from Golembeck Reporting Services and I'm pleased to say that there will be a transcript of the bidders conference posted on the DHS website in the next few days so you don't even have to worry about writing things down.

I'm going to give a brief overview of some of the high points of the mechanics of the RFP itself and then I'm going to turn the floor over to Andrea who will talk for a few minutes about Healthy Families and then Jeanne will talk about Nurse-Family Partnership, and then Clare will talk about Parents As Teachers.

Once all of that is done we will open the conference call up for questions. They'll be additional instructions at that time about the keys to press in order to be placed in the queue. So right now if everything is working correctly you can hear us, you cannot hear each other, so we'll go through this basic information and then move on to the first substantive presentation.

The purpose of the RFP is to provide funds for two purposes. One is to start new home visiting programs. The second is to expand existing ones. We are looking for proposals to implement or expand three specific program models; the Nurse-Family Partnership, Healthy Families Illinois or Parents As Teachers.

Now that the RFP has been issued, we are asking interested applicants to send us a letter of intent. We would like to receive those by December the 30th. We want your letter to specify which model you're interested in implementing. That's going to help us plan the review process.

You can submit your letter by sending an e-mail to Brenda Hodson at the address specified in the guidance on Page 4, or by faxing a letter to Brenda's attention and the fax number is in the RFP as well. Proposals are due at 3:00 in the afternoon on Tuesday, January the 20th.

Let me talk just a moment about eligible applicants. Essentially any public or private not-for-profit community based organization in Illinois is eligible to apply for funds under this proposal. There is one exception to that and that pertains to agencies that presently have a grant or contract with the Ounce of Prevention Fund to operate a Parents Too Soon program.

For this RFP we are excluding proposals from those agencies for the purpose of expanding their existing Parents Too Soon programs. Our reason for doing that is that the Ounce of Prevention Fund has additional resources as a part of this appropriation for the expansion of Parents Too Soon programs, so that is enough said.

As we go along through the process of, not just today's bidders conference but as we go along through the process of having the RFP posted, questions obviously will come up after today. We will post the questions and the answers on our website so please check it frequently to get information about clarifications on the proposal or on the request for proposals obviously we want to make this information available to everybody.

There is an e-mail address in the RFP on Page 6 about that you should use in submitting questions. That is your official source of information about clarifications for the RFP. You rely on what we post on the website. The awards under this RFP will range in size from approximately $50,000 to $500,000. We expect to make somewhere between six and eight awards and those dollar amounts that I just mentioned are on an annual basis.

We hope to be in touch with successful applicants by the 1st of March. At that point the successful agencies will receive a letter from Secretary Adams. That letter is not an authorization to begin providing services. You have to wait until you receive from us and we receive from you a signed community services agreement.

So you are not authorized to begin operating the program and getting payment from us until the community services agreement has been executed by both parties and filed with the Office of the Comptroller. We file them very expeditiously after we receive the signed agreements back from successful applicants.

Let's see. We are asking for two budgets to come in with your proposal. The first is for three months, the last three months of this state fiscal year, the months of April, May and June. Second, we would like you to submit an annual budget to cover all of state fiscal year '10 or July 2009 through June 2010.

Let me skip ahead. We covered commencement of services. I think those are the points I wanted to make about the mechanics of the process. At this point I'm going to turn the microphone over to Andrea Palmer to talk about Healthy Families Illinois.

MS. PALMER:

Okay. There is a PowerPoint presentation for that goes along with my presentation today as well as Jeanne's and Clare's and hopefully you have access to it from the internet, but this presentation begins on Page 8 of that PowerPoint presentation.

Healthy Families Illinois is an intensive home visiting program designed to help new and expected parents, at risk for child abuse and neglect, to reduce that risk and get their children off to a healthy start.

We accomplish this goal by helping to strengthen the parent-child relationship, helping parents develop realistic expectations for their children, improving family support systems, and supporting healthy child growth and development.

Healthy Families Illinois is modeled after the Prevent Child Abuse America, Healthy Families America program model. The program adheres to 12 evidence-based best practices which form the framework for implementation and operation of a Healthy Families program. These best practices, also known as critical elements, can be described in three categories:

Service initiation, through which we initiate services prenatally or at birth using a standardized assessment tool to systematically identify families who are most in need of services. We offer services voluntarily and use positive outreach efforts to build family trust.

The second category will be service content. We offer services over the long-term, three to five years, using well-defined criteria for increasing and decreasing the frequency of home visiting services. Our services should are comprehensive, culturally relevant, and designed to improve family functioning and reduce families' risk for child abuse and neglect. All families engaged in services should be linked to a medical provider and other needed services and staff members should have limited case loads.

The third category of best practices is around staff characteristics. Staff should be selected based upon their ability to establish trusting relationships, have extensive role specific training and have access to ongoing reflective supervision.

Community involvement is critical to the successful implementation and operation of a Healthy Families Illinois program. Providers are expected to work closely with the community to design program services that meet the unique needs of the community as well as maintain an Advisory Committee of community stakeholders and program participants, to assure that programs continue to meet the needs of the community.

Home visitors should be selected based upon their personal characteristics, educational or experiential backgrounds. Staff must have receptive, sensitive, non-judgmental personalities needed to establish the rapport required to provide effective services. Home visitors must be able to work with diverse family types and meet their varying needs.

Assessment workers and home visitors must have a high school diploma or its equivalent and supervisors must have at least a bachelors  degree. In addition to having the interpersonal skills that prepare them for their role, home visitors must also receive formal training to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve the program's goals.

There are a variety of reasons to initiate services prenatally or at birth. One, it helps to link parents and infants to early preventive medical care, it reaches parents when they are receptive to information and eager to learn how to care for their child, it assists families in developing appropriate expectations for their child's development, and it identifies over-burdened families early and provides guidance and support to curb drastic outcomes related to child abuse. It also facilitates the formation of a trusting relationship between the home visitor and the family.

It is essential that the home visitors maintain three foci or focuses: The parent, the child and the parent-child relationship. Services that support parents' needs reduce stress, improve home environment, and improper healthy conditions for children. In addition, these services strengthen the relationship between the parent and the home visitor and increase the parents' receptivity to other forms of services.

The following services are routinely provided during home visits: Developmental delay screenings, referral and follow-up, monitoring well-child visits and immunization, linking families to medical and healthcare providers, and providing information, referrals and linkages to other needed services.

The number of families that each home visitors serves comprises a caseload. Limited caseloads allow home visitors to spend more time with each family, facilitate intensive and responsive services individualized to meet the needs of the family, afford staff time to receive the training, supervision and ongoing development needed to support their families, and reduces the likelihood of staff burnout and turnover.

Healthy Families Illinois programs are required to affiliate with the Healthy Families America organization. There is an annual fee. The Department supports HFI providers who go on to become accredited through HFA or the Council on Accreditation.

For more information on Healthy Families program model, visit the HFA website at www.healthyfamiliesamerica.org, and now Jeanne is going to talk to you about Nurse-Family Partnership.

DR. ANDERSON:

Thank you, Andrea. What I'd like to do you is just take a walk through Nurse-Family Partnership and to start by saying that Nurse-Family Partnership is an evidence-based program and it has three primary goals for the program and the program wants to make sure that their improvement in pregnancy outcomes, improvement in child's health and development, and improvement in parents' economic self-sufficiency.

The NFP programs have strong theoretical underpinnings starting with the self-efficacy theory and that's the mother's ability to change certain behaviors by learning to draw upon her own strength and successes, the human ecology theory, that the mother and the child social context are profound influences on the mother's life and the child's life, and the attachment theory that they're sensitive parental caregiving is a major influence on the child's growing sense of security in the world.

Nurse-Family Partnership uses a client centered approach that focuses on the strengths of the mother and the family members as well as their successes in managing the challenges in their lives. The Nurse-Family Partnership services, competency, education and guidelines are focused on serving families that are determined to be most at risk, and these were often teens, usually unmarried.

The outcomes proven to assist in helping families achieve health, self-sufficiency and early attachment and bonding are providing services that focus on improving parental health, starting early in pregnancy to achieve healthy births as early and preferably 16 to 20 weeks, improving infant and toddler development and safety, assisting families in moving to self-sufficiency, and creating parental prenatal and infant attachment and bonding.

It's believed that pregnancy for the first time and starting between 16 to 20 weeks of pregnancy really helps the nurses and the participants be able to work on those health risk factors that are often found in the high risk population. The guidelines address smoking cessation, substance use, diet and exercise, as well as other areas that impact health and well-being of mother, family, and child.

Key program components. Again, to service low-income, first-time parents, those who have lower resources with higher risk factors, and first-time mom's where there is a window of opportunity to impact development and skills, parental skills and resources that are good for the baby now and in the future.

Nurse home visitors are highly educated. They're usually BSN registered nurses with clinical skills, expertise and knowledge. Visits begin early in pregnancy and continue through the first two years of the child's life. Nurses follow developmentally appropriate guidelines that a culturally sensitive and unique to the family.

There is a clinical information system with the Nurse-Family Partnership programs that helps monitor program implementation and helps to be able to strengthen the program, and there is powerful relationships that are fostered between the client and the nurse around the client's goals.

For NFP referral, the eligibility is usually first-time pregnant, low-income women no later than the 28th week of gestation and realistically by the 25th week and it is preferred between 16 to 20 weeks. Likely referral partners are WIC clinics, family planning/pregnancy testing centers, obstetricians, pediatricians who particularly serve low income Medicaid clients, prenatal care providers, clinics, community-based organizations, hospitals, schools, school health nurses, churches, and of course self-referrals.

When you think about client enrollment and caseload building in Nurse-Family Partnership it's usually one RN to 25 participants. It usually means that 50 percent enrollment means one RN would need 50 referrals and it's critical to take into account client attrition over time.

So in summarizing that, the bottom line is is an agency needs 58 referrals per nurse over nine months to meet caseload expectations. A four nurse home visiting team would need 232 referrals over the first nine months of program replication.

What does a typical Nurse Family program look like? Usually it will consist of one nurse supervisor who is an MSN preferred; four nurse home visitors, BSN preferred; and one administrative clerical support staff.

Elements of the Nurse-Family Partnership that assure model fidelity is that the services offered need to make sense to women and the services are flexible and the guidelines support the unique needs and wants of the families. Mothers enroll early in pregnancy, as we said before hopefully between 16 to 20 weeks and no later than 28 weeks; frequent home visits by nurses for two and a half years; and typically home visits occur weekly for the first four to six weeks of the participant entering the program and then every other week until the birth of the baby, then weekly for another four to six weeks, biweekly until the baby is two-years old, and these are flexible guidelines and can be adjusted to meet the needs of the family.

Powerful relationships foster client strengths and are oriented around the client's goals. Nurse home visitors with their clinical and nursing education background are trained in cultural sensitivity, health clinical assessment, and partnering with individuals to improve health outcomes.

In addition, the Nurse-Family Partnership nurses receive education and training through the NSO, National Service Office, for Nurse-Family Partnership. Nurse-Family Partnership has visit by visit guidelines that keep interventions focused while addressing the uniqueness of each family, and as I said before NFP uses a CIS reporting system that allows you to monitor the success of the program as well as the participants.

When you think about what happens in home visit, there are educational domains and sub-domains that are shared during nurse home visits. The first domain is personal health which addresses health maintenance practices, nutrition and exercise, substance use, and mental health functioning.

The next domain is environmental health. It's home and safety, work, school and neighborhood. Life course development, family planning education and livelihood. The maternal role, the mothering role, physical care and behavioral and emotional care, attachment and bonding of parent and child.

Family and friends is another domain, personal network relationships and assistance with healthcare or child care, and health and human services which is service utilization or being able to access resources in the community.

What does the National Service Office of the Nurse-Family Partnership do? Number one, we provide specialized nursing education in Denver for all home visiting staff, provides technical assistance by nurse consultants, program managers and program developers throughout the life of the program, provides a data specialist to assist in all data training and collection needs, provides ongoing support at state and federal levels to assure funding for home visiting programs and works in close collaboration with your state to assure that all data and program information is shared so that you receive the necessary tools to implement a quality evidence-based Nurse-Family Partnership program.

And what Nurse-Family Partnership is looking to do is in close collaboration is IDHS to see how we can better assist Illinois families in reaching their dreams, and I just wanted to add, Andrea, that at this point that once the IDHS criteria is met, that there is an application process that also goes with the Nurse-Family Partnership model, and I'm going to turn it over to Clare.

MS. ELDREDGE:

Thank you, Jeanne. Good afternoon. My name is Clare Eldredge and I'm training manager for the Ounce of Prevention Fund and I specialize in Parents As Teachers. The Ounce of Prevention Fund serves as the Illinois state office for Parents As Teachers and as such coordinates and provides training and technical assistance for the 220 PAT programs in the state.

My charge today is to help you better understand Parents As Teachers. The PAT vision is that all children will learn, grow and develop to reach their full potential and its mission is to provide the information, support and encouragement parents need to help their children develop optimally during the crutial early years of the life. The PAT Born to Learn model is the vehicle used to reach and assist families.

So what is PAT? It's a strength-based family education and parent support model. Born in Missouri in 1984, this home visiting program is voluntary and focuses on prevention as it addresses the root causes of child abuse, unrealistic expectations of children, feelings of isolation and parental stress.

The Born to Learn curriculum is research based and promotes optimal child development and positive parent-child relationships and is the core of the Born to Learn model. Originally designed as a universal access program for all families with children, prenatal to Kindergarten entry, PAT's Born to Learn model has been adapted and targeted for high needs families.

It has a strong evidence base with numerous studies demonstrating positive outcomes and is nationally recognized. The Born to Learn model is supported through training, technical assistance and researched by the Parents As Teachers national center in St. Louis, Missouri.

The PAT model is based on the following beliefs: All parents deserve support as their child's first and most influential teacher; that the home is the child's first and most important learning environment; and that the family is the unit of learning.

PAT begins prenatally because research has shown us that the child's early years are critical. The PAT Born to Learn model emphasizes that respect for families' traditions and cultures is essential in order to engage and build strong relationships with families, relationships that are based on parent empowerment, appreciation of diversity and partnership.

PAT also believes that one size doesn't fit all. The model is structured so that services to families are adapted and individualized to meet the needs of each family and the community they live in, and PAT is committed to promoting the development of each child through the use of a child development neuroscience curriculum based on established and emerging research.

PAT goals focus on both the parent and the child. The goals are to increase parental knowledge of child development and improve parenting practice, to provide a means for early detection of potential learning problems, prevent and reduce child abuse and neglect, and to increase children school readiness and school success.

For the purposes of this RFP, the PAT Born to Learn model will be targeted for at-risk families. An eligible family must be low income with a pregnant mother and/or a child under the age of one. Programs will need to develop an outreach plan that determines the specifics of the target population that will be served and details how the program will identify and recruit and enroll eligible families.

The PAT Born to Learn model has four components; personal visits, group meetings, screening and resource network. Personal visits are the heart of the program and support parents in their parenting role in order to promote that optimal development and positive parent-child interaction.

Personal visits are delivered in the home. However, when extenuating circumstances exist, visits can be held in a mutually agreed upon site outside of the home. For high needs families, personal visits are completed weekly or twice a month depending on need. Visits generally last 50 to 60 minutes, although more time may be required depending on the number of children in a family or family needs.

The average time allotted per personal visit for planning, service delivery, record keeping and travel is approximately two and a half hours. Caseload side for a full-time parent educator delivering weekly visits is 12 to 14 families.

If visits are twice a month, caseload size is 24 to 25 families. Parent educators use the Born to Learn curriculum on personal visits and visit topics are individualized with respect to families' needs and concerns.

The group meeting component provides opportunities for parents to acquire information about child development parenting and positive parent-child interaction while gaining support from each other. During group meetings parents are encouraged to build support networks by talking with each other about common experiences and concerns.

Group meetings are offered at least monthly and held at times and locations that are convenient to families. Multiple strategies such as transportation and child care should be employed to encourage parents to attend meetings.

Across the program year the program provides a variety of meeting formats, including but not limited to, parent-child interaction, parent presentation plus, that is a guest speaker with a particular expertise, small ongoing groups and community events. Group meeting topics and formats should be responsive to the special populations or groups served by the program such as pregnant women, teen parents, non-English speaking parents, et cetera.

The screening component provides regular information about each child's health and developmental progress, increases parents' understanding of their child's development and identifies strengths and abilities as well as concerns.

All children enrolled in the program receive developmental health, hearing, vision screenings at least once each program year. Developmental screening includes the areas of language, intellectual, social-emotional and motor development through the use of instruments approved by PAT National Center. Most of the programs in Illinois use ASQ or Denver II.

Screenings should be administered with sensitivity to cultural background and accommodation for the families' primary language. When screening results indicate the need for further assessment, parent educators should provide parents with appropriate early intervention resource information.

Screening can be conducted either by program staff or by an outside agency. If provided by an outside agency, the PAT program must have a written agreement with the agency that states results will be reviewed with the parents and forwarded to the program.

The fourth component is the resource network. Through the resource network PAT programs connect families to needed resources and take an active role in the community establishing ongoing relationships with other institutions and organizations that serve families.

PAT programs should have well-defined procedures for providing families with information about and helping them access community resources. Program staff should be knowledgeable about those resources including informal network, local customs and events.

Because this RFP is for a targeted population, each family will have an individual family support plan, an IFSP, with appropriate family, adult and parent child goals. With family permission, program staff consult with other organizations serving the family in order to coordinate services.

The staff for a PAT program should have the knowledge, skills and sensitivity to respond effectively to families' community, cultural and language background. It is preferred that both supervisors and parent educators have a bachelors degree in early childhood, child development or a related field and supervise experience working with families with young children.

However, an individual program may include additional or alternative education or work history requirements that they find appropriate and acceptable to meet the needs of their community. In other words, while a four-year degree is preferred, it's not absolutely necessary in order to be trained as a PAT parent educator.

All PAT supervisors and parent educators must successfully complete the PAT Born to Learn prenatal to three years training institute. Supervisors do have the option of attending the first two days of the institute or attending all five days, and we strongly encourage that they attend all five days.

The institute is a comprehensive five-day training and covers neuroscience research on early development and learning, effective personal visits and visit plans, facilitation of parent-child interaction, ideas for parent group meetings, ways to provide connections to community resources, services to diverse families, red flags in areas of development, hearing, vision and health, and recruitment and in program organization.

Three to six months after attending the institute, parent educators must attend an institute follow-up day either face to face -- either through a face to face training or online. The follow-up is designed to answer questions and concerns about the curriculum or the model after a few months of implementation.

During the institute participants spend time getting acquainted with the Born to Learn curriculum that is based on current child development and neuroscience research. Three very large modules include prenatal to 36 month home visit plans for monthly, biweekly or weekly visits.

It also includes resource information on child development and human diversity written specifically for parent educators. Parent handouts with child development and parenting information are included and come in two readings levels. The curriculum and handouts are both available in Spanish and English.

Training fees for the Born to Learn Institute include a $520 registration fee for the five-day training and $295 for the curriculum. Each parent educator must have their own curriculum. The cost of the follow-up day is included in the registration fee.

In Illinois PAT training is offered through the Ounce of Prevention Fund's Illinois Birth to Three Institute both in Chicago and Springfield. To get started with the implementation of a PAT program, please contact me or Maurine Brennan at the Ounce of Springfield office.

We will help you individualize your program's needs within the PAT guidelines and discuss strategies for you to consider during the preliminary planning process. You will be sent a PAT program plan to complete prior to registration for training. Once the program plan is completed and approved by our office you will then register for training. This process can take three to four weeks.

The PAT supervisor and parent educator then attend the Born to Learn Institute. During the institute participants will complete daily assessments to demonstrate an understanding of the program material and to become certified as PAT parent educators.

Successful completion of the training automatically affiliates your program with Parents As Teachers National Center and you will be certified for one year. In order to maintain PAT certification for subsequent years, supervisors and parent educators must complete a requisite number of in-service or wrap-around hours and pay a recertification fee of $40.

Parents As Teachers is a national model, but when implemented in your community it becomes a local program. There are resources available to help you better understand how to implement PAT. Two especially helpful resources are how to implement a PAT booklet and PAT standards and quality indicators.

Both are available at the Illinois PAT website www.opfibti.oig/pat and at the PAT national website www.parentsasteachers.org. Thank you for your interest in PAT and I look forward to working with you and the Department of Human Services as we increase home visiting services for Illinois families.


MR. SCHUBERT:

Thank you, Clare. All right. I want to make one more general statement and then we will open the phone lines for questions. One of the things I did not mention was data systems and we are expecting every agency that is funded under this proposal to use the Department's cornerstone management information system to collect data.

For those of you who elect to follow the Parents As Teachers model, you will be expected to use their web-based data reporting system as well, and if you elect to implement the Nurse-Family Partnership model you'll be required to use their web-based data system as well in addition to cornerstone. So now I will open the floor for questions. Please go ahead with your question.

CALLER:
This is Susan Crous. I'm wondering, can grant funds be used initially to support training of home visitors?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yes.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


CALLER:
Good afternoon. This is Mikada London (inaudible) Our first question is, the funds that we're looking at, are they federal or state funds?

MR. SCHUBERT:
These are state funds Mikada.

CALLER:
Okay. Hi, Ralph. Andrea.

MS. PALMER:
Hi, Mikada.


CALLER:
And then another question is, after the three-month period, what is the process to make applications if we're selected for continued funding?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Let me say two things. We'll clarify this on the website, but I think it will be essentially identical to the process that we use now.

CALLER:
Okay.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Which is, for the everybody else's benefit, is a very straight forward process. There is -- we have not talked about any form of continuation application so your initial proposal is the important thing.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yep.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Diane from Healthy Family Chicago.

MR. SCHUBERT:
High.

CALLER:
I have two questions. One, is there a geographic priority involved in this at all? Are there some areas, in other words, that you would like us to really zero in on or no, or can you vary from the areas that you're currently working in?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Andrea, I think has the answer. Go ahead.

MS. PALMER:
It's up to you to demonstrate the need in your community and so your proposal should demonstrate that there is a need for additional services.

CALLER:
Okay.


And my other question is
do you have to continue in the model that you're currently using or could you move to another model as a way of providing more continuity to the target population?

MS. PALMER:
Let me see if I understand your question, Diane. Are you saying that you would start -- you would continue with your Healthy Families program and then start a new program model for additional families?

CALLER:
If we, instead of using the Healthy Families model which we currently have, would it work to save you Parents As Teachers model which to me is kind of like the next level up and it may involve some of those same parents but you would still be looking for that targeted population under PAT, but both populations would be eligible.

MS. PALMER:
This RFP does not affect your current grant, your current contract. That stays the same and so this is an application, if you wanted to apply for a PAT program that you would serve additional families based on need, that would be one way of doing it but it has no affect on your current contract for your HFI program.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Go ahead with your question.


CALLER:
The question has already been asked that I was going to ask. My name is Christine Smith, and my question was regarding whether grant funds could be used for the training.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay. Yes, and of course yes, they can.

CALLER:
Yes. Okay.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Pam Hommand with the Child Abuse Council in Moline.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Hi.

CALLER:
And I have a question about the RFP. It talks about letters of support from collaborating partners and other service providers but it doesn't indicate how many of those you might want.

MS. PALMER:
However many you think will support your application and show that you have collaborative relationships.

CALLER:
All right. Thank you.


MR. SCHUBERT:
Hi, go ahead.


CALLER:
Hi, I'm Yvonne Jake with (inaudible) Public Schools and Prevention Initiative. Our question is, is existing prevention initiative programs eligible for this, to participate in this grant.

MS. ELDREDGE:
Yes, you are.

CALLER:
Yes, we are. And we're encouraged to use community partnerships in this?

MS. ELDREDGE:
Yes, you are. You have a prevention initiative, an ISBE funded prevention initiative program; is that correct?

CALLER:
Yes, we do.

MS. ELDREDGE:
All right. Then through this you can serve more families.

CALLER:
Okay. So additional employees would be okay?

MS. ELDREDGE:
Right, exactly.

CALLER:
Okay. Great. Thank you very much.


CALLER:
Yes. Hi, this is Tim Snowden and my question is we're an existing Healthy Families Initiative provider and is there anything that would prohibit us from submitting an application for expansion in that area and then a new proposal to serve in another area?

MS. PALMER:
What agency are you from, I'm sorry?

CALLER:
Case Hope United.

MS. PALMER:
Yes, you could do an expansion of your Healthy Families program.

MR. SCHUBERT:
And then if you wanted to submit two proposals, one for expansion and one for a new project, then that's certainly fine.

CALLER:
Okay. All right. That's my question.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Julia Marines and I have a question regarding use of the PAT curriculum as you're providing HFI services. Would that require dual reporting?

MR. SCHUBERT:
I think, Julia, and we may clarify this response later, but I think, Julia, the operative criterion is the program model as a whole that you are using rather than the parenting education curriculum.

CALLER:
Okay.

MR. SCHUBERT:
So assuming that you're still considering yourselves a Healthy Family program, then your reporting would be done through Cornerstone.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you, Ralph.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Helen Huber and I'm with the Regional Office of Education down in Montgomery County and my question is about the project period which is on the application page. Since we're submitting two budgets, one for the last three months of this fiscal year and a second budget for the entire next fiscal year, is that project period then actually goes to spots of time together?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, as long as we can see two separate budgets, one for the end of this fiscal year and another one for the end of, or excuse me, another one for all of next fiscal year, that's fine.

CALLER:
Okay. So then on the application and plan page of your application where it says project period, we would write April of '08 through June of '10?

MR. SCHUBERT:
June of '08 and then you would do another set of budget pages that would go July 1st of '09 through June 30th of 2010.

CALLER:
Okay. And then both of those are listed as the project period on the cover page that has to be submitted?

MR. SCHUBERT:
On the cover page for the application as a whole?

CALLER:
Yes.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay. April 1 of '08 through June 30th of 2010 would be fine.

CALLER:
Okay. And then if a person is awarded this grant, then would that be the entire period that they would receive the money for or would there be a renegotiation after the first three months?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, our expectation is that we would fund you at the FY '10 level that you proposed.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you very much.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay.


CALLER:
This is Barb Fisley from Cook County Department of Public Health. I just want to reclarify that our current grant we can stay with and we don't really need to apply for this?

MR. SCHUBERT:
That's correct. This is just for expansions and new initiatives. This does not pertain to your existing Healthy Families grant award.

CALLER:
Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay.


CALLER:
Hello. My name is Kate McGruter and I run a Prevention Initiative and my question is will priority be given to programs already funded through DHS or will there just be an evaluation panel that just reviews each RFP for merit not for priority to DHS programs?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Each proposal is reviewed on its own merit.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


MR. SCHUBERT:
Go ahead.

MS. PALMER:
Maybe the question was answered.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Go ahead with your question.

CALLER:
Is this program -- this is Kathy Noonan. Is this program eligible at all for any type of reimbursement Medicaid reimbursement?

MR. SCHUBERT:
No. In fact our present Healthy Families Illinois grants are used as part of the state's match for its TANF award. So no, these are not being used to obtain Medicaid matching funds.


CALLER:
Okay. Another quick question. As far as like cost of living increase, is that factored into ongoing grants or no?

MR. SCHUBERT:
That depends on the amount of funds appropriated each year by the Illinois General Assembly.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


CALLER:
Hi, Ralph. This is Robin from St. Clair County Health Department.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Hi, Robin.

CALLER:
Hi, and I was wondering, where are the other Nurse Family Partnership grants? I noted there were three in Illinois.

MR. SCHUBERT:
I believe -- go ahead, Jeanne.

DR. ANDERSON:
There are two existing Nurse Family Partnership programs in the State of Illinois. One is in Cane County and the other one is in Mt. Vernon, Illinois. One is under the auspices of the Ounce of Prevention in Mt. Vernon and Cane County works independently with Nurse-Family Partnership.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Dale Seedler, Southern Illinois Healthcare. Is the Nurse-Family Partnership, can those funds be used as incentives for program participants such as car seats or something like that?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Those kinds of things? Generally those are allowable costs, Dale, in DHS grants. Obviously we would be looking to see that the budget supports the core requirements of Nurse-Family Partnership.

CALLER:
Sure. Half of it couldn't be for car seats?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Right.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
You're welcome.


CALLER:
Hi, Ralph. This is Judy from Macon County in Decatur, Illinois.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Hi.

CALLER:
Hi. Our administrator, not to put you on the spot, but our administrator wanted to know, he was concerned about payment for those three months. Would it be in a timely manner?

MR. SCHUBERT:
We will do the best that we can, and obviously the constraints that the comptroller is facing in trying to make payments on the state's obligations are well-known.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Kimberly from Heartland International Health Centers.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Hi.

CALLER:
Hi. This question has been asked in a couple different forms and I'm sorry if it's repetitive but I want to make sure that I'm clear. I realize that the initial contract period is from April to June and in the RFP it mentions that the renewal for FY '10 is based on the availability of funds and provider's performance and I just want to be clear about what performance we would be expected to demonstrate during those three months.

MR. SCHUBERT:
I think our primary focus will be on your success in following the implementation plan for the first three months that you proposed, you know, that you included in your proposal. So we want to see that everyone is making great progress.

Obviously a three month time period doesn't allow for you to have delivered a lot of services, and primarily in the early part of your work you'll be recruiting and hiring staff, sending them to training and those kinds of things. So we just want to see that people are making progress.

CALLER:
Okay. I mean can you make any statement regarding the likelihood of FY '10 funds? We had some concern about hiring staff knowing we had a three month contract.

MR. SCHUBERT:
No, I think the, you know, it is all contingent on the General Assembly appropriation of funds to the Department.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you, Ralph.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yep.


CALLER:
Yes, I was wanting to clarify a question that was asked earlier about geographic areas. I don't think that was ever actually said. Is this application going to be divided geographically throughout the state or is it just dependent on the award?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, we're expecting everyone to propose a target area, you know, a geographic area that you intend to serve. We have not prioritized particular parts of the state for services and as Andrea mentioned earlier, we're looking to your needs assessment in your proposal to demonstrate that the services are needed in the community that you want to serve.

CALLER:
Thank you.


CALLER:
It has already been answered. Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Rosaura Realegeno. (Inaudible) Can we apply for the PAT program or is there any restriction?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, if you're interested in applying for a grant to implement a Parents As Teachers program, you certainly may.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


CALLER:
Hi, this is Ann and I work for You Can. I was wanting some clarification on the credentialing and membership fees for the Healthy America?

MR. SCHUBERT:
For Healthy Families Illinois?

CALLER:
For the national.

MS. PALMER:
The credentialing fees are set by the National Office and they're a percentage of your program's operating budget, but initially there is affiliation fee of $325 per year. So once you become affiliated then they give you some time to then decide whether or not you're going to become credentialed.

CALLER:
And if we are accredited by COA, would that be an option?

MS. PALMER:
There is a reciprocal agreement between COA and Healthy Families America. If your agency is already accredited by COA, then you would then work with HFA to do that part. It's not as intensive as if you were just going through HFA. So there is some relationship between the two, but you would still have to be credentialed by HFA.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.


CALLER:
Yes. We are a licensed home health agency in the State of Illinois and we are considering the Nurse-Family Partnership program model, and I was wondering, we receive referrals for high risk newborns currently and bill those as skilled visits under the Illinois HFS Medicaid program and wondering if we can continue to bill those visits as skilled visits under the nursing home health agency and while the grant staff provide the visits through the Nurse-Family Partnership program.

DR. ANDERSON:
I don't think that there is going to be any conflict with that. It would be one of the things that, as part of the process for the development of your program planning, we would look at that with you to make sure that you were able to continue to bill for those high skilled visits.
I don't think that there would be a conflict around that but I've not had anybody ask that question before so we would work that through with you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yeah, watch our website for a clarification on that question. We'd like to take some time to think through the answer.

CALLER:
All right. I'm sorry, I didn't identify myself. This is Beth Zerlini from Southern Illinois Homecare.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Okay.

CALLER:
Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yep.


CALLER:
Hi, my name is Carolyn Williams and I'm with Mother Sons Day Care and we're a small day care center but we have two teachers who are certified Parents As Teachers educators and we were wondering do we have as good an opportunity to receive one of these grants as perhaps a bigger organization?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yes, you do have as good an opportunity.

CALLER:
Okay. Thank you.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yep.


CALLER:
Hi, I'm Kathy Markey from Kankakee. We currently have a PI program and use the PAT model, and we're kind of limited to our school district. Would it be more beneficial for us to work on a county-wide basis with what we want to do?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, that's up to you. You can use this as an opportunity to expand your Parents As Teachers program, but the area you expand to obviously depends on a number of things including the additional resources you would require, you know, the approval of your host organization, you know, a variety of things. But from our point of view there is nothing stopping you from doing that.


(Whereupon there was a brief pause in the proceedings.)


MR. SCHUBERT:
Go ahead.

CALLER:
Hi, this is Kathy Trusner from De Witt Piatt Health Department. I'd like to understand the vision of how these programs relate to current health programs that health departments may already be implementing such as family case management or teen parents services. Is there any caveat for integration? How does that work?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, you know that one of the things in the RFP, one of the things you're asked to address in your proposal is how your proposed home visiting program would interact with family case management, teen parent services and other services offered by a local health department, so in part you need to address that question in your proposal.

I think we have always regarded these three home visiting models as providing more intensive services than family case management typically has been able to. Clearly all three of these program models have the expectation that most or all of the services are provided in homes as opposed to other settings.
So from that point of view I have always thought of Healthy Families or Parents As Teachers or Nurse-Family Partnership as supplements of the services that can be provided by a health department in addition to family case management or teen parent services.

So the way in which you integrate all of those things is something that you should present to us in your proposal.

CALLER:
So I'm hearing that it's more of a supplement to those current programs rather than in place of?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Yeah, I think that's a fair assessment, yes.

CALLER:
Thank you.


CALLER:
Hi. I was wondering if home visiting programs that are interested in starting a doula program should consider this?

MR. SCHUBERT:
Well, these funds are not intended for support of doulas.

CALLER:
Okay.

MR. SCHUBERT:
Thank you. All right. We'll wait just a minute and see if there are additional questions.


(Whereupon there was a brief pause in the proceedings.)


MR. SCHUBERT:
All right. There don't seem to be any additional questions in the queue so we thank you for your time and interest and we look forward to receiving your letters of intent by the 30th of December and your proposals on January the 20th. Best of luck to all of you.

(Conference concluded.)


STATE OF ILLINOIS )
)
COUNTY OF SANGAMON )

C E R T I F I C A T E

I, MOLLY A. HOBBIE, a Certified Shorthand
Reporter and Notary Public, in and for said County
and State, do hereby certify that I reported in
shorthand the proceedings had on the hearing of the
above-entitled cause on December 17, 2008, and that
the foregoing is a true and correct transcript of
my shorthand notes so taken.
Given under my hand and seal this 18th
day of December, A.D., 2008.

Certified Shorthand Reporter
and Notary Public
CSR # 084-003897

My commission expires April 14, 2010.