IDHS-DEC Home Visiting (23-444-84-0660)

Summary Information

Awarding Agency Name Illinois Department of Human Services
Awarding Division Name Early Childhood
Announcement Type NOFO
Funding Opportunity Title IDHS-DEC Home Visiting
Funding Opportunity Number 23-444-84-0660-01
Application Posting Date February 15, 2022
Application Closing Date April 15, 2022
Catalog of State Financial Assistance (CSFA) Number 444-84-0660
Catalog of State Financial Assistance (CSFA) Popular Name IDHS-DEC Home Visiting
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s) Not applicable
Award Funding Source Federal or Federal pass-through
State
Estimated Total Program Funding Approximately $8,000,000 to 12,500,000 (depending on the availability of funding)
Anticipated Number of Awards To be determined based on coverage of services.
Award Range To be determined: funding per child will generally range from $6,910 to $8,213.
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement No
Indirect Costs Allowed Yes
Restrictions on Indirect Costs

Yes

Indirect costs cannot be compensated without an election or a negotiated rate on file with the State of Illinois. For details, see Section C8: Eligibility Information, Indirect Cost Rate.

Technical Assistance Session

Session Offered: Yes
Session Mandatory: No

TA Session 1: Bidders' Conference: Wednesday, March 2, 2022, 10am Central Time

Use this Session 1 Link

Meeting Number/Access Code: 246 362 29858

Meeting Password: zkD42qBrtU2

The TA Session 1 recording and the slides are available here at the "Illinois Home Visiting" page of the IgrowIllinois website.

TA Session 2: FAQs: Wednesday, March 16, 2022, 1pm Central Time

Use this Session 2 Link

Meeting Number/Access Code: 246 931 66982

Meeting Password: vAmshSjA833

The TA Session 2 recording and the slides are available here at the "Illinois Home Visiting" page of the IgrowIllinois website.

A. Program Description

1. Program Summary

The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS)/ "Department") envisions a human services system that enables all to thrive regardless of race, zip code, and disability. IDHS' diversity, equity, and inclusion mission is to become an anti-racist organization that pursues equity and racial justice with intention, vigor, and tenacity.

The IDHS Division of Early Childhood (DEC) Home Visiting Program supports pregnant people and parents with young children ages 0-5 who live in communities that face greater risks and barriers to achieving positive maternal and child health outcomes. Families choose to participate in home visiting programs, and partner with health, social service, and child development professionals to set and achieve goals that improve their health and well-being.

The goals of the IDHS-DEC Home Visiting program are to:

  • Improve maternal and child health;
  • Prevent child abuse and neglect;
  • Reduce crime and domestic violence;
  • Increase family education level and earning potential;
  • Promote children's development and readiness to participate in school; and
  • Connect families to needed community resources and supports.

Home visitors and families develop strong relationships and trust through meeting regularly and addressing families' needs. Home visitors:

  • Support healthy pregnancy practices
  • Provide information on topics such as breastfeeding, safe sleep, preventing unintended child injuries, and nutrition
  • Encourage early language development and early learning at home
  • Teach positive parenting skills like reading, playing, and praising good behaviors
  • Work with caregivers to set goals for the future, continue their education, and find employment and child care solutions
  • Connect families to other services and resources in their community

The IDHS Home Visiting program has the following priority populations identified by the federal Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Enrollment is not limited to the MIECHV priority populations, but programs are expected to PRIORITIZE these populations for enrollment.

  • Low income household (below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level or FPL)
  • Household contains an enrollee who is pregnant and under age 21
  • Household has a history of child abuse or neglect or had interactions with child welfare
  • Household has a history of substance abuse or needs substance abuse treatment
  • Someone in the household uses tobacco products in the home
  • Someone in the household has attained low student achievement or has a child with low student achievement
  • Household has a child with developmental delays or disabilities
  • Household includes individuals who are serving or formerly served in the United States armed forces

2. Funding Priorities or Focus Areas

In alignment with the Governor's vision to make Illinois the best state in the country to raise young children and the Illinois Commission on Equitable Early Childhood Education & Care Funding's recommendations, IDHS-DEC is working to align federal and state funding for home visiting into a single IDHS-DEC Home Visiting Program with the goal of:

  • Better targeting funding to at-risk communities through a Statewide Needs Assessment;
  • Increasing funding rates to support higher program quality; and
  • Consolidating IDHS-DEC home visiting programs.

The desired outcomes of this alignment include higher quality services for families and strong programs through increased workforce compensation, higher quality data, and unified program standards.

Service providers using any of the following four evidence-based home visiting models may apply for funds:

  • Early Head Start Home-Based (EHS)
  • Healthy Families America (HFA)
  • Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP)
  • Parents as Teachers (PAT)

While this NOFO covers increased expenses to support higher program quality, funding has not increased. Therefore, IDHS-DEC does not anticipate an increase in total services funded, and we are limiting the number of eligible communities. If funding increases in future years, we may be able to expand both slots and communities.

3. Authorizing Statutes or Regulations

The IDHS-DEC Home Visiting program is supported by state General Revenue Funds for the Healthy Families Illinois program, and Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds. Authorizing statutes are as follows:

  • Healthy Families Illinois: Public Act 88-614 (enacted in 1994).
  • American Rescue Plan Act (P.L. 117-2), Section 9901

4. Scope of Services

Programs funded by this NOFO will provide evidence-based home visiting services to pregnant persons and families with young children aged 0-5 years, provide screenings and assessments, and refer families to services as needed. The program deliverables, performance measures, and performance standards are described in the sections that immediately follow. 

The IDHS-DEC Home Visiting program requires service providers to use its designated data system to collect family-level data on the demographic measures and benchmarks shown in MIECHV Form 1 and Form 2. Training and technical assistance will be provided to funded programs, to support data collection and reporting.

5. Deliverables

  1. Home Visiting Programs
    1. Home visiting model
      1. Implement one of the following evidence-based home visiting models with fidelity
        1. Early Head Start Home-Based (EHS)
        2. Healthy Families America (HFA). Note: Successful applicants must request the HFA child welfare protocol from the HFA National Office within 6 months of the contract start date
        3. Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP).
        4. Parents as Teachers (PAT).
      2. Programs must be in good standing with their national model.
      3. Prior approval from the Department must be secured prior to any anticipated change to the program model.
    2. Program policies and procedures
      1. Maintain written local program policies and procedures that are consistent with the program standards set by one of the four home visiting models noted above.
      2. Review and incorporate all policies and procedures found on the igrow Illinois website, including those related to breastfeeding, safe sleep, child welfare, substance use issues, cultural and linguistic responsiveness, and dual enrollment.
      3. Maintain written policies and procedures for connecting referred families to other available services when your program has no openings.
      4. Assure compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).
      5. For educational institutions, assure compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
    3. Hiring and compensation
      1. Recruit, hire, and retain home visitors who mirror the cultural, ethnic, and linguistic characteristics of the families served.
      2. Fill any staff vacancies without delay.
      3. Assure that all home visitors and supervisors join the Gateways to Opportunity Registry. Assure that home visitors receive the salaries shown in the table below, at minimum. The indicated minimum salaries for supervisors are strongly recommended. If it is not feasible to implement the minimum salary requirement for home visitors in SFY23, applicants can propose to incrementally raise salaries in order to reach the minimum salary by SFY25.
      4. Position Minimum Salary for 1.0 FTE (Chicago, Cook, and Collar Counties) Minimum Salary for 1.0 FTE (rest of the state)
        Home Visitor $46,800 $37,485
        Home Visiting Supervisor $59,598 $48,058
    4. Professional development
      1. Assure that home visitors receive program-specific training and ancillary training according to the standards specified by the home visiting model.
      2. Assure that all staff participate in trainings required by IDHS.
      3. Maintain documentation of the training received by each direct service staff and supervisor.
    5. Reflective supervision and reflective practice
      1. Follow the home visiting model's required supervisor/home visitor ratio to ensure adequate supervision.
      2. Provide home visitors with the individual reflective supervision hours required by the model.
      3. Maintain documentation of supervision, team meetings, field observations, training, and other staff development led by the supervisor.
      4. Utilize Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC) as described in the Illinois model for IECMHC on the Governor's Office of Early Childhood Development (GOECD) IECMHC webpage. To find a consultant, use the Illinois registry of IECMH Consultants.
    6. Program capacity
      1. Maximum service capacity is the largest number of families that could potentially be enrolled at a point in time, if the program were operating with a full complement of hired and trained home visitors funded by this program. This number does not change if the program is not fully staffed (for example, if there is a vacancy). The maximum service capacity number per 1.0 FTE home visitor is as follows
        1. Early Head Start: 10 families
        2. Healthy Families America: 12 families
        3. Nurse-Family Partnership: 25 families
        4. Parents as Teachers: 15 families
      2. Programs that have been active for a year or longer will maintain at least 85% of their maximum service capacity.
      3. Programs must have a plan in place for maintaining continuity of services to home visiting families if their home visitor is on extended leave or leaves the agency.
    7. Priority population
      1. Prioritize the MIECHV priority populations for enrollment (see section A2 above).
        1. At least 80% of enrolled families must meet at least one of the 8 MIECHV priority population criteria.
        2. Therefore, no more than 20% of enrolled families may meet none of the 8 MIECHV priority population criteria. These remaining families must represent at least one Early Learning Council priority population OR have a mental health concern.
      2. If there are open slots in the program, the program must accept all referrals of model-eligible families with child welfare involvement and model-eligible families experiencing homelessness, regardless of family income.
    8. Service plans, assessments, and screenings
      1. Develop and update a service plan or goal plan for each participant within the timeframe required by the model.
      2. For each participant, complete any model-required assessments within the timeframe required by the model.
      3. For child participants, conduct developmental screenings using a screening tool approved by the Department and refer to services as indicated.
      4. For adult participants, conduct intimate partner violence screening, mental health screening, and substance use screening using tools approved by the Department, and refer to services as indicated.
      5. For adult participants, provide education on topics including breastfeeding, safe sleep, well child visits, and postpartum care, and refer to services as needed.
    9. Culturally responsive program services
      1. Provide model-specific home visiting services that are culturally and linguistically responsive to the populations served. For guidance, see the Guiding Principles for Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness from the Erikson Institute.
      2. Provide culturally and linguistically responsive program materials (e.g., brochures, curricula, handouts, etc.) for the major groups within the population to be served.
    10. Screening, enrollment, and coordinated intake
      1. Participate in the local All Our Kids (AOK) Network, Integrated Referral and Intake System (IRIS), or other coordinated intake and referral initiative, where such a system exists. (If there is no such initiative in your program's geographic area, this requirement does not apply to your program.)
      2. Engage in community public awareness and outreach activities to support program enrollment.
      3. Avoid dual enrollment in more than one intensive home visiting program.
      4. Avoid waitlisting families when there are open home visiting slots offered by another local program (for example, by establishing referral partnerships with the other program).
      5. Respond to all referral sources with the status of referrals and timeline for enrollment within two (2) business days of receiving the referral.
      6. Respond to all follow-up inquiries from referral sources) within two (2) business days of receiving the inquiry.
      7. Track trends related to the population served, and adjust program plans to assure that families from priority populations are prioritized for services.
    11. Community systems development and cross-program referral
      1. Dedicate a portion of a designated staff member's time to participate regularly as a member of at least one local community collaboration to support the goals and principles defined in the 2021 Joint Statement on Community Systems, Coordinated Intake, and IRIS.
        1. Share with the collaboration available, relevant, aggregated program data that contribute to community needs assessment, setting a common agenda, or other local initiatives.
        2. Promote shared messaging and materials from the collaboration among families and staff.
        3. Participate in at least one local collaboration initiative, such as developmental screening tracking using the ASQ-Enterprise, or the use of the Integrated Referral and Intake System (IRIS).
      2. Assist participating families in connecting with Early Intervention (EI), using the protocols and forms developed by the Illinois Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics.
      3. Assist participating families in connecting with medical providers and with ancillary services such as mental health services, the Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) program, and intimate partner violence services, with support from the Department.
    12. Data and data systems
      1. With written consent from participants, use the information management system designated by the Department to record information on program participants, and the activities of program staff.
      2. Maintain an individual case record for each family enrolled in the home visiting program. Record required demographic data, including but not limited to participant age, race, ethnicity, primary language, and income. Information for each month must be entered in the data system by the fifth (5th) day of the following month.
      3. Collect and report the MIECHV benchmark data, with support and technical assistance from the Department.
      4. Participate in regular data calls coordinated by the Department, to assure data quality and completeness.
    13. Quality assurance and program improvement
      1. Implement a plan for quality assurance, as specified by the home visiting model.
      2. Participate in Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) efforts offered by IDHS.
    14. Family voice
      1. Regularly incorporate input from home visiting families to improve program quality, as specified by the home visiting model.
      2. Invite families to participate in local collaborations and advisory bodies.
    15. Partnership with IDHS
      1. Participate in required regular programmatic and fiscal monitoring reviews. Programmatic monitoring will include use of the HOVRS (Home Visit Rating Scale).
      2. Participate in required monthly provider calls and other required meetings as scheduled by IDHS.
      3. Participate in the Department's efforts to improve the health and well-being of families enrolled in program services.
  2. Doula Services (OPTIONAL--only for home visiting programs that opt to include doulas)

While doula services are not required as part of the IDHS-DEC Home Visiting program, doula services may be supported through this funding stream if they are offered as an integrated part of a long-term, evidence-based home visiting model. These doula services are not intended to be stand-alone services. Ideally, doula services should commence at the beginning of the third trimester of pregnancy. The doula and long-term home visitor should work together to introduce services to expectant families. The doula and home visitor must coordinate home visits in the perinatal period to avoid duplication of services while ensuring that the long-term home visitor begins a relationship with the family early enough to ensure a smooth transition from doula/home visitor services to just home visiting services.

There is a readiness factor that should be considered if your program is considering integrating a doula component into your home visiting program. The home visiting program must be large enough to be able to serve most pregnant women who desire a doula, and the program must be able to take on all the roles and responsibilities of doula services. In general, at least two doulas are needed as part of a program's staffing pattern, In addition, a ratio of at least two (or more) home visitors for every doula will ensure that there will be enough home visitors to serve all participants who are finishing doula services.

  1. Core program services
    1. Promote active engagement of new program families in long-term home visiting services through initial prenatal and intrapartum program experiences;
    2. Provide seamless transitions from doula to home visiting-only services;
    3. Promote a parental sense of confidence, competence, and comfort in the mother's physical, emotional, and social transition into parenthood;
    4. Promote positive health practices for developing baby and new parent;
    5. Promote a growing sense of emotional availability, attunement, and engagement with the developing and new infant;
    6. Prepare for labor and delivery and provide intrapartum doula support in an effort to bring about positive birth outcomes for infant and parent;
    7. Support newborn care and feeding; and
    8. Organize and facilitate prenatal groups.
  2. Hiring and compensation
    1. Recruit, hire, and retain doulas who mirror the cultural, ethnic, and linguistic characteristics of the families served.
    2. Fill any staff vacancies without delay.
    3. The program must maintain two (2) full time equivalent (FTE) home visitors for every one (1) FTE doula. The goal is to have all doula participants transition into the long-term home visiting program. Because doula services are time-limited, doulas serve more families over the course of a year than a home visitor. Generally, a ratio of at least two (or more) home visitors for every doula will ensure that there will be enough home visitors to serve all participants who are finishing doula services. Consider family retention in your home visiting program when thinking about the addition of doulas.
    4. Doulas must have flexible schedules because it is crucial that they be present during labor and delivery, and births often happen outside of normal working hours, so they should be available on-call 24/7. This expectation should be made clear to candidates for doula positions, and programs should keep this requirement in mind in deciding how they will grade and compensate doula positions.
    5. Generally, about 10 percent of a doula's time is spent facilitating prenatal groups. Prenatal groups offer an efficient way for parents-to-be to learn about prenatal care and the birthing process while connecting with a peer group and continuing to build a relationship with their doula.
    6. Programs must ensure that there is backup capacity so that participants will receive doula support when their primary doula is on vacation, ill, unable to attend a birth, or when there are vacancies in the program. This will generally mean having at least two (2) doulas as part of a program's staffing pattern, but backup can also be achieved by having a supervisor trained as a doula or by having a part-time position in addition to a full-time doula.
    7. Programs must assure that doulas receive the salaries shown in the table below, at minimum. The indicated minimum salaries for supervisors are strongly recommended. If it is not feasible to implement the minimum salary requirement for doulas in SFY23, applicants can propose to incrementally raise salaries in order to reach the minimum salary by SFY25.
    8. Position Minimum Salary for 1.0 FTE (Chicago, Cook, and Collar Counties) Minimum Salary for 1.0 FTE (rest of the state)
      Doula $46,800 $37,485
      Doula Supervisor $59,598 $48,058
  3. Professional development
    1. The program will be offered technical assistance from the SE Professional Learning Network.
    2. New doulas must receive pre-service and in-service training from the SE Professional Learning Network.
  4. Clinical consultation
    1. A clinical consultant is part of the doula model so that doulas have the support they might need to serve participants who have medically complicated pregnancies. These consultants are generally registered nurses, midwives, or other professionals who have training in the medical aspects of pregnancy and childbirth. They are generally contracted for about 10 hours per month.
  5. Program capacity
    1. A 1.0 FTE doula typically has a caseload of nine (9) to ten (10) participants at any one time. Some of these persons are pregnant; some are postpartum. Doulas attend approximately two births every month. Doula caseload sizes are smaller than those for other home visitors because of the extended time spent with the birthing parent during labor and delivery.
    2. The doula intervention is time-limited (generally lasting for about five months) so a caseload of nine (9) or ten (10) families at any one point in time would result in a doula serving approximately 22- 24 families over the course of a year.
  6. Culturally responsive program services
    1. Provide doula services that are culturally and linguistically responsive to the populations served. For guidance, see the Guiding Principles for Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness from the Erikson Institute.
    2. Provide culturally and linguistically responsive program materials (e.g., brochures, curricula, handouts, etc.) for the major groups within the population served.
  7. Community systems development and cross-referrals
    1. The ability of doulas to be present during the labor and delivery process is key to the success of this service. Programs must have agreements with local birthing hospitals that ensure that the hospital will allow doulas to attend the births of their participants.
    2. The program should also have memoranda of understanding (MOUs) or other mechanisms in place with prenatal clinics, WIC programs, etc. to ensure that pregnant persons in the program's population will be referred by the 26th week of pregnancy.

6. Performance Measures and Performance Standards

  1. Home Visiting Programs
    1. Registered staff
      1. MEASURE: Report the number of home visiting supervisors and home visitors, and the percentage of these staff with registry numbers in the Gateways to Opportunity Registry. Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: 100%.
    2. Families served
      1. MEASURE: Report the number of unduplicated families served year-to-date. Entered into the IDHS selected database, including race, ethnicity, and primary language. Reported quarterly from the data summary report (September, December, March, June).
      2. STANDARD: Report the number quarterly.
    3. Caseload capacity
      1. MEASURE: Current caseload as a % of maximum caseload capacity. (Maximum caseload capacity is the highest number of households that could be enrolled at a point in time, if the program is operating with a full complement of hired and trained home visitors.) Reported quarterly from the data summary report.
      2. STANDARD: Programs that have been active for one year or longer must achieve at least 85% of maximum caseload capacity. Entered into IDHS selected database.
    4. Priority populations
      1. MEASURE: Percentage of participants meeting no MIECHV priority population criteria, reported quarterly from the data summary report:
        1. Low income household (below 100% FPL)
        2. Household contains an enrollee who is pregnant and under age 21
        3. Household has a history of child abuse or neglect or had had interactions with child welfare
        4. Household has a history of substance abuse or needs substance abuse treatment
        5. Someone in the household uses tobacco products in the home
        6. Someone in the household has attained low student achievement or has a child with low student achievement
        7. Household has a child with developmental delays or disabilities
        8. Household includes individuals who are serving or formerly served in the United States armed forces
      2. STANDARD: No more than 20% of participants meet no MIECHV priority population criteria. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    5. Coordination and Collaboration
      1. MEASURE: Membership in local collaborations (as documented by an MOU, letter, or other document from a collaboration that confirms the program's membership and describes expectations for member participation). Reported annually (June).
      2. STANDARD: Membership document from least one collaboration, provided annually (June).
    6. Data quality-participant demographics
      1. MEASURE: Percentage of program participants with missing demographic data in data system. Reported quarterly from the data summary report.
      2. STANDARD: No more than 10% missing data for any data indicator. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    7. Data quality-benchmark outcomes
      1. MEASURE: Percentage of program participants with missing benchmark data in the data system. Reported quarterly from the data summary report.
      2. STANDARD: No more than 10% missing data for any benchmark outcome data indicator. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    8. Well-child visit
      1. MEASURE: Percentage of children receiving their last well-child visit based on the American Academy of Pediatrics schedule. Reported annually from the data summary report (June).
      2. STANDARD: 80%. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    9. Postpartum visit
      1. MEASURE: Percent of mothers enrolled prenatally or within 30 days after delivery who received a postpartum care visit within 8 weeks (56 days) of delivery. Reported annually from the data summary report (June).
      2. STANDARD: 75%. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    10. Developmental screening
      1. MEASURE: Percentage of children with at least one timely Ages and Stages Questionnaire 3 (ASQ-3) screening during the reporting period (for children aged 9 months, 18 months, 24 months, 30 months). Reported annually from the data summary report (June).
      2. STANDARD: 80%. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    11. Perinatal depression screening
      1. MEASURE: Percent of participants who are screened for depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) within 3 months of enrollment (for those not enrolled prenatally) or within 3 months of delivery (for those enrolled prenatally). Reported annually from the data summary report (June).
      2. STANDARD: 85% of participants screened. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    12. Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) screening
      1. MEASURE: Percent of primary caregivers screened for intimate partner violence (IPV) within 6 months of enrollment using a validated tool (Futures Without Violence for women, Baylor for men). Reported annually from the data summary report (June).
      2. STANDARD: 90%. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    13. Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) referral
      1. MEASURE: Percent of primary caregivers with a positive screen for IPV (21+ for Futures and 11+ for Baylor) who receive referrals to IPV resources. Reported annually from the data summary report (June).
      2. STANDARD: 90%. Entered into the IDHS selected database.
    14. Family Engagement and Empowerment
      1. MEASURE: Number of home visiting families participating in group activities, such as parent groups, program advisory board meetings, CQI team meetings, or local collaboration meetings. Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: Report the number quarterly.
  2. Doula Services (only for home visiting programs that include doulas)
    1. Families served
      1. MEASURE: Report the number of unduplicated families served year-to-date. Entered into the IDHS selected database, including race, ethnicity, and primary language. Reported quarterly (September, December, March, June).
      2. STANDARD: Report the number quarterly. Entered into IDHS selected database.
    2. Caseload capacity
      1. MEASURE: Current caseload as a % of maximum caseload capacity. (Maximum caseload capacity is the highest number of pregnant persons that could be enrolled at a point in time, if the program is operating with a full complement of hired and trained doulas.) Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: Programs that have been active for one year or longer must achieve at least 85% of maximum caseload capacity. Entered into IDHS selected database.
    3. Prenatal enrollment
      1. MEASURE: Percent of participants enrolled in doula services by the end of the seventh month of pregnancy. Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: 80%. Entered into IDHS selected database.
    4. Doula-home visiting integration
      1. MEASURE: Percent of doula participants assigned to a long-term home visitor. Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: 80%. Entered into IDHS selected database.
    5. Doula-attended births
      1. MEASURE: Percent of Doula participants with a Doula-attended birth. Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: 75%. Entered into IDHS selected database.
    6. Breastfeeding
      1. MEASURE: Percent of participants that initiate breastfeeding. Reported quarterly.
      2. STANDARD: 75%. Entered into IDHS selected database.

B. Funding Information

  • This is a competitive funding opportunity.
  • The release of this NOFO does not obligate the Illinois Department of Human Services to make an award.
  • The sources of funding for this program are: state General Revenue Funds for the Healthy Families Illinois program and Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Funds. IDHS will determine how the funding sources will be allocated for each grant, and the allocations will be noted in each grant.
  • The Department anticipates the availability of approximately $8,000,000 to $12,500,000 (total funding for NOFO). Funding per child will generally range from $6,910 to $8,213.
  • Subject to appropriation, the grant period will begin no sooner than July 1, 2022 and will continue through June 30, 2023.
  • Applications for renewal or supplementation of existing projects are eligible to compete with applications for new State awards. There is no limit on the number of application packages an applicant may submit.
  • Successful applicants under this NOFO may be eligible to receive two subsequent one-year grant renewals for this program. Renewals are at the discretion of the Department and are based on performance and sufficient appropriation.
  • Proposed budgets must be sufficiently detailed and justified to be approved by IDHS. Successful applicants will NOT receive a grant agreement until after their budget has been approved through the Community Service Agreement tracking system (CSA).
  • Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be pre-approved by the Department and on file with the Department. Subcontractors are subject to all provisions of this Agreement. The successful applicant Agency shall retain sole responsibility for the performance and monitoring of the subcontractor.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

This competitive funding opportunity is limited to applicants that meet the following requirements:

  • The applicant has met the Prequalification and Mandatory Requirements listed in this funding opportunity.
  • Eligible applicants include private, not-for-profit community-based organizations that are incorporated and have been granted 501(c) (3) status; public community-based organizations, including units of local government, and private, for-profit community-based organizations.
  • Program models. Applicants must use one of the following evidence-based home visiting models:
    • Early Head Start Home-Based (EHS)
    • Healthy Families America (HFA) Note: Successful applicants must request the HFA child welfare protocol from the HFA National Office within 6 months of the contract start date.
    • Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP)
    • Parents as Teachers (PAT)
  • Service areas: This Notice of Funding Opportunity is for the provision of home visiting services to families who reside in Illinois. Communities eligible to apply for this grant are shown in the table below. Funding is only available for services in these listed communities.
    • While this NOFO covers increased expenses to support higher program quality, funding has not increased. Therefore, IDHS-DEC does not anticipate an increase in total services funded, and we are limiting the number of eligible communities. (If funding increases in future years, we may be able to expand both slots and communities.)
    • In alignment with IDHS-DEC's goal of better targeting funding to at-risk communities, applicants will receive bonus points for serving Priority 1 or Priority 2 communities below, which were identified in the 2020 MIECHV Needs Assessment. Applicants serving only Priority 3 communities should not expect to receive renewals after the end of SFY23.
    • Applicants are not required to serve an entire county, and may serve a smaller geographic area within a county.
Priority Description Counties Bonus Points
Priority 1 "At-risk communities" identified in the 2020 MIECHV Needs Assessment which currently have HFI funding. Champaign, Clay, Cook, DuPage, Fayette, Franklin, Jackson, Kane, Lake, Livingston, Rock Island, Sangamon, St. Clair, Stephenson, Vermilion, Will. Applicants will receive 10 bonus points if they propose to serve at least one of these communities.
Priority 2 Communities identified in the 2020 MIECHV Needs Assessment for "high consideration" for funding due to high need and low capacity, which currently receive HFI funding. Adams, DeKalb, Lee, Macoupin, Ogle, Whiteside, Williamson. Applicants who do not serve any Priority 1 communities will receive 5 bonus points if they serve at least one of these communities.
Priority 3 Communities currently served by HFI programs which do not appear in the above two priority categories. Bond, Carroll, Clinton, DeWitt, Logan, Madison, McLean, Menard, Perry, Piatt, Woodford. None

2. Prequalification

Applicant entities will not be eligible to apply for a grant award until they have prequalified through the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA) Grantee Portal, Grantee Links tab. Registration and prequalification are required annually. During prequalification, verifications are performed including a check of federal Debarred and Suspended status on the Illinois Stop Payment List and good standing with the Secretary of State. An automated email notification is sent to the entity alerting them of "qualified" status or providing information about how to remediate a negative verification (e.g., inactive DUNS, not in good standing with the Secretary of State). A federal Debarred and Suspended status cannot be remediated.

For assistance navigating government application prequalification procedures, refer to IDHS GATA Prequalification Assistance.

Applicants must be prequalified; therefore, applications from entities that have not prequalified prior to the due date of this application will NOT be reviewed and will NOT be considered for funding.

The following information is required to complete registration:

  • Organization's Dun & Bradstreet number (DUNS); For additional information on DUNS, refer to Section Unique Entity Identifier (DUNS number) and System for Award Management (SAM) below.
  • Organization's Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN);
  • Organization type;
  • Illinois Secretary of State File ID (required for non-profits, for-profits and limited liability corporations);
  • Organization's name;
  • Organization's mailing address;
  • Organization's primary email address;
  • Organization's primary phone number; and
  • Organization's fiscal year-end date.

3. Unique Entity Identifier (UEI replaced DUNS April 2022) and System for Award Management (SAM)

Each applicant is required to:

  • Be registered in SAM.gov before submitting its application. Provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application; if your organization does not yet have a EIU/DUNS, refer to the Dun & Bradstreet page to request one
  • Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active award, an application ,or plan under consideration by the Department

The Department may not make an award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements. If an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Department is ready to make an award, the Department may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making an award to another applicant.

4. Pre-Award Requirements

The pre-award process includes a financial and administrative risk assessment utilizing an Internal Controls Questionnaire (ICQ) and a Programmatic Risk Assessment (PRA). The ICQ is completed for the organization, while the PRA must be completed for each separate grant for which an applicant intends to apply. The Department may NOT issue a Notice of Award or a Grant Agreement to any applicant that does not have a submitted and approved FY 23 ICQ and a submitted and complete FY 23 PRA(s). While these are NOT required prior to submitting the application, they are required prior to the Department issuing an award.

Applicants that have not completed an ICQ and/or PRA for the grant award year at the time of application will be contacted by the Department to complete these pre-award requirements.

These grantee pre-award requirements are mandated by Federal Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200) and the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA). Grantees must complete these requirements prior to receiving a grant award from the State of Illinois.

5. Registration in CSA

The CSA Tracking System is the system the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) utilizes for approving budgets and issuing grant awards. If an applicant entity is not already registered in the CSA Tracking System, they should begin the registration as soon as possible so they may submit a signed budget in CSA. Successful applicants will NOT be issued an award without a fully approved budget in the CSA System. See the CSA registration instructions.

6. State and Federal Laws and Regulations

The agency awarded funds through this NOFO must agree to comply with all applicable provisions of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to nondiscrimination, sexual harassment and equal employment opportunity including, but not limited to: The Illinois Human Rights Act (775 ILCS 5/1-101 et seq.), The Public Works Employment Discrimination Act (775 ILCS 10/1 et seq.), The United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) (42 USC 2000a-and 2000H-6), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 USC 794), The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 USC 12101 et seq.), and The Age Discrimination Act (42 USC 6101 et seq.).

7. Cost Sharing or Match Requirements.

Cost sharing or matching is NOT a requirement of this application.

8. Indirect Cost Rate

Indirect Cost Requirements and Restrictions

In order to charge indirect costs to this grant, the applicant organization must have a Federal or State annually negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) or must elect to use the De Minimis Rate.

Every organization that receives a state award must make an indirect cost rate proposal or election in the State of Illinois Grantee Portal, Centralized Indirect Cost Rate Election System, including organizations that are choosing not to claim payment for indirect costs.

Indirect Cost Rate Election:

  • Federally Negotiated Rate. Organizations that receive direct federal funding may have an indirect cost rate that was negotiated with the Federal Cognizant Agency. Illinois will accept the federally negotiated rate. The organization must provide a copy of the federal NICRA and submit an Indirect Cost Rate Proposal in the Crowe Activity Review System (CARS). 
  • State Negotiated Rate. The organization must negotiate an indirect cost rate with the State of Illinois by completing an indirect cost rate proposal in the CARS system if they do not have a Federally Negotiated Rate and would like to negotiate a rate with the State of Illinois.
    • De Minimis Rate. An organization may elect a De Minimis rate of 10% of modified total direct cost (MTDC)**. Once established, the De Minimis rate may be used indefinitely. If programs elect to use the De Minimis rate, it is critical that program budgets accurately calculate the MTDC base. Please see the regulation below and note the exclusions to MTDC.

**2 CFR § 200.68 Modified Total Direct Cost (MTDC). MTDC means all direct salaries and wages, applicable fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, and subawards and subcontracts up to the first $25,000 of each subaward or subcontract (regardless of the period of performance of the subawards and subcontracts under the award). MTDC excludes equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs, tuition remission, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs and the portion of each subaward and subcontract in excess of $25,000. Other items may only be excluded when necessary to avoid a serious inequity in the distribution of indirect costs, and with the approval of the cognizant agency for indirect costs.

  • "No Rate": Grantees have discretion not to claim payment for indirect costs. Grantees that elect not to claim indirect costs cannot be reimbursed for indirect costs. The organization must record an election of "No Indirect Costs" into the Indirect Cost Rate Election System.
    • Crowe Activity Review System (CARS). CARS will allow your organization to document your already established federally approved indirect cost rate, or complete an indirect cost rate proposal (see State Negotiated Rate above). Submission requirements are located on page 2 of the Uniform Budget Template as well as 2 CFR 200 Appendices IV, V & VII.

Organizations which have not previously made an indirect cost rate election must submit an election (and indirect cost rate proposal, if necessary) immediately and no later than 3 months after receiving an award notification. If the organization elects to submit a Federally Negotiated Rate or a State Negotiated Rate they will receive an invitation to submit their proposal in the CARS system.

Organizations that have previously established an indirect cost rate election and would like to continue with a Federal or State Negotiated Rate must submit a new indirect cost rate election immediately and no later than 6 months after the close of their organization's fiscal year.

Organizations that do not make a submission inside the CARS system within the required timeframes will not be allowed to claim indirect cost reimbursement.

For more information, see the Centralized Indirect Cost Rate System and Illinois Grant Accountability and Transparency Act webpages.

9. Other Requirements (if applicable)

Cultural and Linguistic Competency

Services must be provided in a culturally responsive manner. Grantees need to understand, acknowledge, and respect the differences among the populations served (ethnicity, race, religion, age, gender, abilities, language and other characteristics) and provide services in a relevant competent and appropriate manner. Programs should demonstrate an ability to adapt individual programs, services and policies to fit the cultural context of the individual, family or community.

Confidentiality

Grantees must comply with confidentiality statutes set forth by state and federal governments, including, but not limited to: the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (45 CFR 160, 162, and 164); the Illinois Personal Information Protection Act (815 ILCS 530/1 et seq.); the Illinois Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Confidentiality Act (740 ILCS 110/1 et seq.); Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Regulations (34 CFR Part 99); and Administrative Code Title 77 Section 630.20.

10. Grant Fund Use Requirements

All applicants will use grant funds according to the guidelines, conditions, and parameters set forth in this funding notice and in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and the terms and conditions of any applicable federal awards.

Please refer to 2 CFR 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, PART 200 Subpart E - Cost Principles to determine the appropriateness of costs.

  • Allowable costs are those that are necessary and reasonable based on the activity(ies) contained in the Scope of Work, are justified in the Budget Narrative, and are allowable under Subpart E of 2 CFR 200. It is expected that administrative costs, both direct and indirect, will represent a small portion of the overall program budget. Any budget deemed to include inappropriate or excessive administrative costs will not be approved. Program budgets and narratives must detail how all proposed expenditures are necessary for program implementation.
  • Unallowable costs: Please refer to 2 CFR 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, PART 200 Subpart E - Cost Principles to determine the appropriateness of costs. In addition, and specific to this grant, the following costs will be unallowable without specific prior written approval from IDHS:

    • Entertainment costs, except where specific costs that might otherwise be considered entertainment have a programmatic purpose and are authorized in the approved budget (2 CFR 200.438)
    • Capital expenditures for general purpose equipment, including any vehicle regardless of cost, buildings, and land (2 CFR 200.439)
    • Capital expenditures for improvements to land, buildings, or equipment which materially increase their value or useful life (2 CFR 200.439)
    • Food, and other goods or services for personal use of the grantee's employees, contractors, or consultants of the grantee unless authorized as per diem under the State of Illinois Governor's Travel Control Board (2 CFR 200.445).
    • Deposits for items, services, or space
  • Simplified Acquisition Threshold: Potential grantees under this funding announcement may receive an award in excess of the Simplified Acquisition Threshold, currently $250,000 (Refer to 2 CFR 200 Section 200.88). Therefore, the grantee must be aware of the following regarding the Simplified Acquisition Threshold as it will be applicable to any qualifying subaward:

    • That the grantee agency, prior to making a subaward with a total amount of funds greater than the simplified acquisition threshold, is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the designated integrity and performance system accessible through SAM (currently FAPIIS) (see 41 U.S.C. 2313);

      • That an applicant, at its option, may review information in the designated integrity and performance systems accessible through SAM and comment on any information about itself that the awarding agency previously entered and is currently in the designated integrity and performance system accessible through SAM;
      • That the awarding agency will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in the designated integrity and performance system, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in §200.205 awarding agency review of risk posed by applicants.

11. Post Award Requirements of Applicant

Successful applicants agree to provide program services as described throughout this Funding Notice.

Start Date: Applicants must be in a position to begin offering services on July 1, 2022.

  • Technology: Agencies awarded funds through this funding notice should have a computer that meets the following minimum specifications for the purpose of utilizing any required IDHS web-based reporting system and the receipt/submission of electronic program and fiscal information:
    • Internet access, preferably high-speed
    • Email capability
    • Microsoft Excel
    • Microsoft Word
    • Adobe Reader

The purchase of this technology would be an allowable expenditure under the grant and may be budgeted for as part of this application.

  • Site Visits: The applicant agrees to participate in site visits/quality reviews as requested by the Department.
  • COVID Policies and Procedures: Provider organizations shall have written COVID policies and procedures that align with current guidelines put forth by the local Health Department, the Illinois Department of Public Health and/or the Center for Disease Control.
  • Sectarian Issue: Provider organizations may not expend federal or state funds for sectarian instruction, worship, prayer, or to proselytize. If the Provider organization is a faith-based or a religious organization that offers such activities, these activities shall be voluntary for the individuals receiving services and offered separately from the program.
  • Hiring and Employment Policy: It is the policy of the Department to encourage cultural diversity in the work environment and to promote employment opportunities through its programs. The Department philosophy is that the program workforce should appropriately reflect the populations to be served, with special attention given to hiring individuals indigenous to those communities. Consistent with Department policy, whenever a position becomes available, funded programs are encouraged to consider TANF clients for employment, contingent upon their qualifications in the areas of education and work experience.
  • Publication of Studies, Reports or other Program Products: The applicant agrees that products produced for the Department under this award, including, but not limited to research reports, data, analyses, and policy recommendations are the property of the Department and will not be published or distributed except as prescribed by the Department.

D. Application and Submission Information

1. Address to Request Application Package

Application materials are provided throughout this announcement. These materials will be made available in user/printer friendly format and may be found on the Links section of this NOFO. Additional copies may be obtained by contacting the Department at DHS.HomeVisiting@Illinois.gov or (312) 793-1476.

Each applicant must have access to the internet. The Department's web site will contain information regarding the NOFO and materials necessary for submission. Questions and answers will also be posted on the Department's website as described later in this announcement. It is the responsibility of each applicant to monitor that web site and comply with any instructions or requirements relating to the NOFO.

2. Content and Form of Application Submission

Uniform Application for State Grant Assistance

The Uniform Application for State Grant Assistance  is a three-page document used to formalize organization's request to apply for funding. The document requires the signature and email address of the organization's authorized representative. This email address will be used for official communication between the Department and the applicant organization for matters regarding this application.

OPTIONAL Letter of Intent (due March 4, 2022)

Interested applicants are encouraged to send a brief letter of intent to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov by March 4, 2022. The letter of intent is non-binding. The purpose of the letter of intent is to assist IDHS-DEC in assuring that we have a sufficient number of reviewers. The letter of intent should include the following information:

  1. The name and contact information of the applicant organization
  2. The home visiting model to be used
  3. The specific county(ies) or sub-county geographic area(s) to be served
  4. Whether the applicant is considering the integration of doula services.
  5. Whether the applicant has current HFI or MIECHV funding.

Program Narrative (due April 15, 2022)

IMPORTANT: The program narrative makes up the bulk of your application. If an applicant receives an award through this NOFO, the program narrative will become the local program plan and this will be the basis for monitoring compliance by IDHS.

Please provide a complete response to the following sections. If the program narrative is missing from your application packet, your application will receive a score of zero points and your agency will not meet the criteria to receive a grant under this notice of funding opportunity.

Program Narrative Format

Each section must have a heading that corresponds to the headings in bold type listed below, in the order listed below. If the applicant believes that the subject has been adequately addressed in another part of the application narrative, then provide the cross-reference to the appropriate part of the narrative. If a cross-reference is not included in the section, the reviewer will only consider content contained within that specific section. The narrative portion must follow the page maximums where prescribed and must be organized in the format outlined below. A form is provided.

The program narrative must be typed in black ink on 8 1/2 x 11-inch white paper using 12-point type, single-spaced, with 1-inch margins on all sides, and at 100% magnification (not reduced). The narrative must not exceed 12 pages, and additional pages will not be reviewed or scored. Items included as Attachments, including the doula narrative, are NOT included in the page limitation. The entire application must be sequentially numbered and submitted as a single PDF document.

Home Visiting Program Narrative (required, maximum 12 pages)

  1. Executive Summary - maximum 1 page (5 points) For successful applicants, the executive summary will serve as a stand-alone document that will be shared with various state-level stakeholders and others requesting a brief overview of funded projects. Applicants should be concise and direct in addressing the topics below.

    1. Applicant Information: Provide your agency name and agency mailing address, along with the name, phone number, and email address of the contact person for this application.
    2. Number of families to be served:
      1. Provide the number of families to be served by home visiting in SFY23.
      2. Provide the number of children to be served by home visiting in SFY23, if this is different than the number of families served.
      3. If your program is proposing doula services, also provide the number of families to be served by doulas in SFY23.
    3. Budget: Provide the total amount of your SFY23 budget request for this project.
    4. Community and population served: Briefly describe the geographic area to be served, including county(ies) and zip codes. Briefly describe the local population to be served, including age, income, race, ethnicity, and primary language spoken.
    5. Program services: State the home visiting model used by your program and whether your program is currently in good standing with the model. In 1-2 sentences, describe how this model fits the population to be served. List any model enhancements or protocols that you propose to use in SFY23 (such as doulas). In 1-2 sentences, summarize how your program assures that staff provide culturally responsive services. In 1-2 sentences, summarize how your program plans to utilize Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation during SFY23.
    6. Bonus points: State whether you are applying for any of the following bonus points: Priority 1 "At-Risk" Service Area, Priority 2 "High Consideration" Service Area, Culturally Responsive Leadership, Family Empowerment. (Priority Areas are described in Section C.1. of this NOFO (Eligibility Information, Eligible Applicants.) Bonus points for Culturally Responsive Leadership and Family Empowerment are described in Section E.1., Application Review Information, Criteria.)
  2. Community Need - suggested limit 3 pages (total 20 points)
    1. Geographic service area and community need. (5 points)
      1. Applicants must serve one or more of the geographic areas listed under Service Areas in Section C.1., Eligibility Information, Eligible Applicants. For your proposed service area, list the county(ies) and/or subcounty area(s) to be served, complete with all related zip codes. If there are specific boundaries within a given geographic area(s), these must be explicitly spelled out in the application.
      2. Provide data on community needs. For county-level data, please see the Erikson Institute Risk and Reach Report and the IECAM Regional Reports. City of Chicago community-level data are available from sources including Chapin Hall and the Healthy Chicago 2025 Neighborhood Assets and Opportunities Report. For assistance with sub-county level data, please contact IECAM.
      3. Provide the estimated number of home visiting slots in the service area, along with the estimated number of eligible families. The IECAM Regional Reports include county-level data on the estimated number of home visiting slots (see the Home Visiting tab). For assistance with sub-county level data, please contact IECAM.
      4. Explain how the proposed services do not duplicate other home visiting efforts in the service area.
    2. Families to be served. (5 points) Describe the demographic characteristics of families to be served in the selected geographic area. This includes: age, income, race, ethnicity, and primary language spoken. (For county-level data, please see the IECAM Regional Reports. For assistance with sub-county level data, please contact IECAM.) Describe the strengths of families in the community, as well as the barriers that they experience. Briefly describe how your program will prioritize the MIECHV priority populations (which are listed in Section A.1., Program Description, Program Summary). For example, populations may be prioritized by using a weighted eligibility form or by establishing partnerships with organizations that serve these populations.
    3. Coordination. (5 points) The www.igrowillinois.org website contains a list of home visiting programs in Illinois currently known to IDHS. Use the "Find A Program" feature to locate the other home visiting programs within your proposed service area and list them in your program narrative. If there are other home visiting programs located within your service area, briefly describe how your program plans to coordinate with them to improve access for families and avoid competition, dual enrollment, and duplication of efforts.
    4. Recruitment. (5 points) Briefly describe how you will recruit families, including at least one of the MIECHV priority populations. Describe how your recruitment plan will partner with community assets in your service area (such as community-based organizations, faith-based institutions, healthcare providers, health departments, schools, libraries, Family and Community Resource Centers (formerly known as IDHS local offices), community collaborations, and local businesses). Describe how your recruitment efforts will be coordinated with other home visiting programs in your service area (if any).
  3. Capacity - suggested limit 3 pages (total 25 points) The purpose of this section is for the applicant to present an accurate picture of the agency's capacity, qualifications and ability to successfully implement the proposed program described in this Funding Notice. Include the following:
    1. Mission. (5 points) Describe the fit between the proposed program and the agency mission, as well as the agency's knowledge of and standing in the community to be served.
    2. Experience. (5 points) Briefly describe the organization's experience in providing culturally responsive home visiting services to families in the service area. If your organization does not have experience providing home visiting services, describe your experience in providing culturally responsive prenatal to three programs to families in the service area.
    3. Staffing. (5 points) List your agency's current Executive Director, Fiscal Officer, and Home Visiting Program Director, along with their highest appropriate credential. Outline the program's management and staffing structure, including any proposed consultants, such as Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultants. Describe their areas of responsibility and lines of communication, and ensure the description aligns with the organizational chart submitted as Attachment A.
    4. Enrollment and caseload capacity. (5 points) Please provide your current home visiting enrollment (number of children or families currently enrolled) and your program's caseload capacity. Most programs calculate caseload capacity as the percentage of program slots that are currently full. If this percentage is below 85%, please explain.
    5. Governance (5 points). Briefly describe your agency's governance structure. Include a list of the agency's Board of Directors or other governing body, identifying the chairperson and/or other key positions, submitted as Attachment B. If applicable, include the role the governing body will play in the decision-making process and how they receive key program information to inform these responsibilities. If more than 50% of the Board and administrative leaders share the cultural background of the families served, please include this information here for up to 10 bonus points, as described in Section E.1, Application Review Information, Criteria and Weighting of Each Criterion.
    6. Complete Table 1: Provide the name of each staff member to be funded by this application, the total Full Time Equivalent (FTE), and the % of time spent in each of the listed roles. Indicate open positions as "Vacant." In this table, a full-time staff member would be listed as 1.0 FTE. For your agency, please indicate here the number of hours per week that is considered 1.0 FTE: ______.
    7. Home Visiting Staff Name Total FTE FTE Home Visitor FTE Supervisor FTE Other Role
      Example: Mary Jones 1.0 FTE 1.0 FTE
      Example: Jane Lee 1.0 FTE 0.5 FTE 0.5 FTE Outreach Worker
      Example: Anna Smith 0.5 FTE 0.5 FTE
  4. Quality- suggested limit 5 pages (35 points)
    1. Home visiting model. (5 points) In a few sentences, please summarize your home visiting model's approach, including the desired family outcomes, eligibility criteria, initial assessment tool used, intensity of services, and curriculum/content. Describe how you assure that the model is carried out with fidelity. State whether or not your program is currently in good standing with the model. Provide the date of the program's most recent accreditation or credentialing review by the model. Describe how this model meets the specific needs of the population. If any model enhancements or protocols will be used (such as doula, Mothers and Babies, and/or the HFA child welfare protocol), describe them here.
    2. Culturally responsive staffing (5 points) Describe to what extent your program's home visiting workforce reflects the population served (in terms of race, ethnicity, primary language, and other characteristics). Describe the training, professional development, or technical assistance that your program uses to ensure that staff provide services in a culturally and linguistically responsive manner. Describe hiring plans (whenever vacancies occur) to ensure staff reflect the population served.
    3. Staffing supports. (5 points) In 2-3 sentences, describe the home visiting model's requirements for reflective supervision, including the supervisor-staff ratio and the required supervision hours. Describe how home visitors and supervisors are encouraged to obtain professional development. Describe how your program currently utilizes Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC) and how you plan to utilize IECMHC during the grant period. Describe how and when you will meet the minimum salary for home visitors, shown in Section A.5.A.3.d., Deliverables, Hiring and Compensation.
    4. Family voice. (5 points). Describe how the program includes the voices of diverse families in designing or improving the program. If the applicant plans to hire, mentor, or otherwise support the engagement of former participants/parents as home visitors, please include this information here for up to 5 bonus points, as described in Section E.1, Application Review Information, Criteria and Weighting of Each Criterion.
    5. Data and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). (5 points) Describe how the program will utilize data collected to support continuous quality improvement. Include a specific example of how data have been used to drive program improvements.
    6. Intake and referral. (5 points) Describe how local cross-sector or cross-systems partners collaborate on intake and referrals to support families' timely access to services. Describe the process for closing the loop on referrals, to ensure that families receive the referred services and referral sources are informed of the status in a timely manner.
    7. Maternal and child health partnerships. (5 points) Describe how the program collaborates with maternal and child health partners for referrals, information sharing or care coordination. Briefly describe one example of such a partnership.
  5. Assurances. (10 points). Complete the Assurances form as Attachment C to indicate the applicant's intent to meet ten (10) main expectations of the IDHS-DEC home visiting program.
  6. Budget (5 points) Provide a detailed Budget and Budget Narrative in which you clearly describe how the specified resources and personnel have been allocated for the tasks and activities described in your program narrative.
    1. The Budget and Budget narrative must reflect a 12-month period (July 1 - June 30). 
    2. The budget and narrative must tie fiscal activity to program objectives and deliverables and demonstrate that all proposed costs are:
      1. Reasonable and necessary
      2. Allocable, and
      3. Allowable as defined by program regulatory requirements and the Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200), as applicable.
    3. The Budget and Budget narrative must include the following:
      1. Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation ($150/hour x 72hrs/year = $10,800 per year
      2. Annual subscription to Visit Tracker data system: see the DataKeeper pricing page for the current rate schedule based on the number of users
      3. If you are applying for doula funds, include those expenses in your budget , including doula salaries and clinical consultation costs (see the Doula Enhancement Program Narrative section that follows).
    4. The Budget and Budget narrative must be completed in the CSA tracking system. For more information, see Instructions for the CSA tracking system, Instructions for CSA registration, and Information about creating budgets in the CSA tracking system.
    5. The budget template and Instructions can be used as a tool to assist in determining expenses; however, the final budget must be completed in the CSA tracking system. The PDF budget or paper copy will not be accepted, nor should it be included in the application packet.

Doula Enhancement Narrative (optional, maximum 6 pages)

Note: The Doula Enhancement Narrative will be scored separately (the doula narrative points will NOT be added cumulatively to the points for the home visiting program narrative). IDHS-DEC anticipates funding five or fewer Doula-enhanced home visiting programs in SFY23.
  1. Community Need (total 20 points)
    1. Geographic service area and community need. (15 points) Provide a clear definition of the population to be served and convincing evidence, including demographic information, that there is a need for doula services in the service area. Describe how the program reflects the needs of families.
    2. Coordination. (5 points) If there are other doula services in your service area, list those providers and briefly describe how your program plans to coordinate with them to improve access for families and avoid competition, dual enrollment, and duplication of efforts.
  2. Capacity (total 50 points)
    1. Experience. (15 points) Briefly describe the organization's experience in providing culturally responsive doula services to families in the service area.
    2. Staffing. (10 points) Outline the doula program's management and staffing structure. Describe their areas of responsibility and their lines of communication, including how they relate to the home visiting program. Indicate which staff are already in place and which positions are vacant/to be hired. Describe your program's home visitor-to-doula ratio to ensure space for doula participants to transition into long term home visiting services.
    3. Doula coverage. (5 points) Because of the unique nature and demands of labor and delivery, doulas often work non-traditional hours and may sometimes work over 40 hours/week. Please describe your program's plan for doula coverage, including a back-up plan for labor and deliveries when a doula is unavailable or attending another birth.
    4. Caseload size. (5 points) Because time must be allowed for attending births, the maximum size for a doula caseload is ten (10) participants at any one time. Describe your program's proposed doula caseload and the total number of families to be served in SFY23.
    5. Core services. (10 points) Describe your program's plan for: 1) creation of birth plans between doulas and participants; 2) offering prenatal groups, including sample topics and frequency schedule; and 3) supporting and encouraging breastfeeding during the perinatal period. Indicate how many of the proposed services are already in place and state what arrangements need to be made in order to fully implement the program.
    6. Embedding doulas into long-term home visiting program. (5 points) Doula participants are expected to integrate into the long-term home visiting program. Explain your program's plan for full integration of families accessing doula services into long-term home visiting, including the frequency of prenatal visits and by whom, the transition plan from doula to home visitor, and the time frame in which the transition will occur.
  3. Quality (total 25 points)
    1. Culturally responsive staffing. (5 points) Describe to what extent your program's doula workforce reflects the population served (in terms of race, ethnicity, primary language, and other characteristics). Describe the training, professional development, or technical assistance that your program uses to ensure that staff provide doula services in a culturally and linguistically responsive manner. Describe hiring plans (whenever vacancies occur) to ensure doula staff reflect the population served.
    2. Supervision. (5 points) The preferred supervisory ratio for doulas is 1:5, and 1:6 is the maximum. (This means that the supervisor of the Doulas must not supervise more than six (6) staff members in total.) Doula supervisors must attend training to ensure that they are knowledgeable of the doula's job responsibilities and can support their work. Describe your program's supervision ratio and the professional development plan for doula supervisors. Describe your agency's protocol for providing reflective supervision to supervisors.
    3. Clinical consultation. (5 points) Though doula services are not a medical intervention, some participants will have medical complications during pregnancy or in delivery. For this reason, it is important that doulas have access to clinical consultation from someone with a medical background (such as a nurse, a midwife, or a similarly trained expert). Explain your program's plan for engaging a clinical consultant, the consultant's qualifications, and the number of hours per month your program plans to contract with the clinical consultant.
    4. Referral partnerships. (5 points) Explain how your program plans to cultivate agreements with entities that work with pregnant persons in your area, to ensure families can be enrolled in services by the beginning of the third trimester. Indicate how many pregnant persons will be served and describe how all participants will be recruited and assessed for program intake. Describe how your program will coordinate the early identification of pregnant persons, including plans to develop collaborative agreements with local clinics/hospitals for screening of potential participants during pregnancy.
    5. Maternal health partnerships. (5 points) Cite names of hospitals or birthing centers where participants will deliver, and state how your program will formally partner with these entities to ensure that doulas are welcomed into delivery rooms for their participants' deliveries.
  4. Budget. (5 points) See the Home Visiting Program Narrative above for budget instructions. The budget should include all expenses for required doula personnel, professional development, and services to families. Include proposed doula salary and intended use of the clinical consultant in your budget.

Unique Entity Identifiers (DUNS Number and SAM Registration)

Each applicant (unless the applicant is an individual or Federal or State awarding agency that is exempt from those requirements under 2 CFR § 25.110(b) or (c), or has an exception approved by the Federal or State awarding agency under 2 CFR § 25.110(d)) is required to:

  • Be registered in SAM.gov before the application due date. To establish a SAM.gov registration, visit the SAM homepage and/or utilize the instructional link: "How To Register in SAM."
  • Provide a valid unique entity identifier (DUNS number) in its application; and
  • Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active Federal, Federal pass-through or State award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal or State awarding agency.
  • For more information, refer to Section C: Eligibility Information and Grant Funding. Applications that fail to meet the criteria described in Section C: Eligibility Information and Grant Funding will not be scored and/or considered for funding.

3. Application Submission Dates and Times

Letter of Intent

The non-binding Letter of Intent (LOI) is due by March 4, 2022 at 11:59 p.m. Submit the letter via email to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov, with the subject line including: 0660 LOI-Applicant Organization Name-Program Contact Name.
  • For example: 0660 LOI-ABC Community Center-Jane Smith

Full application

The full application is due by April 15, 2022 at 11:59 p.m. Any application not fully submitted by April 15, 2022, will not be considered. If the due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal or State holiday, the reporting package is due the next business day. Submit the completed grant application via email to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov, with the subject line including: 0660-Applicant Organization Name-Program Contact Name.
  • For example: 0660-ABC Community Center-Jane Smith
To be considered, application materials must be emailed by the designated dates and times listed above. For your records, please keep a copy of your email submission with the date and time the application was submitted, along with the email address to which it was sent. The deadline will be strictly enforced.

Intergovernmental Review

This funding opportunity is NOT subject to Executive Order 12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs."

Funding Restrictions

  • The applicant must develop a budget consistent with program requirements.
  • Pre-award costs are not permitted.
  • 2 CFR 200 Subpart E Allowable/Unallowable Costs.
  • In general, the delivery or costs of direct medical, dental, mental health, or legal services are not allowable; however, some limited direct services may be provided (typically by the home visitor) to the extent required to maintain fidelity to an evidence-based model.
  • Refer to Section C.5. Eligibility Information, Indirect Cost Rate for details on Indirect Cost Rate restrictions.

4. Other Submission Requirements

E. Application Review Information

All competitive grant applications are subject to merit-based review.

1. Criteria and Weighting of Each Criterion

The following NOFO Scoring Table provides a summary of the criteria and weighting of each criterion within the program and budget narrative.

Home Visiting Scoring Criteria Maximum Points
Executive Summary contains all of the requested information. 5
Community Need
  1. The geographic area and community risk factors are well described (5)
  2. Description of population served includes geographic area, age, race, ethnicity, language, income, and a rationale (5)
  3. This section reflects coordination with other local HV programs (if applicable) (5)
  4. Recruitment plan is organized and prioritizes MIECHV priority populations (5)
20
Capacity
  1. Mission/vision is consistent with IDHS-DEC HV program priorities (5)
  2. Demonstrated experience serving the local population / implementing HV (5)
  3. Staffing indicates programmatic capacity and Attachment A is included (5)
  4. A rationale is provided for reasonable enrollment and caseload capacity (5)
  5. Governance structure indicates organizational capacity and Attachment B is included. (5)
25
Quality
  1. There is model fidelity, the model fits the local population, and the applicant is in good standing with the model. (5)
  2. Staffing is culturally responsive (5)
  3. Staffing supports are in place, including reflective supervision and Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (5)
  4. Family voice is incorporated in the program (5)
  5. There is a focus on using data to drive improvement (5)
  6. Local cross-systems collaboration includes a mechanism for intake, referrals, and closing the loop (5)
  7. Local cross-systems collaboration includes at least one MCH partners, with which there is a functioning relationship for referrals and information-sharing (5)
35
Assurances Form (Attachment C) (1 point per "yes" answer) 10
Budget is reasonable and necessary, addresses salary requirements, and includes Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation and data system costs. 5
TOTAL REGULAR POINTS 100
BONUS POINTS
Geographic "At-Risk" Priority 1 Service Area: Applicant proposes to serve at least one Priority 1 community 10
Geographic "High Consideration" Priority 2 Service Area: Applicant proposes to serve at least one Priority 2 community (and does not propose to serve any Priority 1 communities). 5
Culturally responsive leadership: Applicant is able to demonstrate and attest to being led by individuals that share the cultural background of the community being served, as defined by the make-up of the Board of Directors and the Organizations' leadership and management being more than 50% led by individuals who share the cultural background of the community being served. 10
Family empowerment: Applicant demonstrates an intention to hire, mentor, or otherwise support the engagement of former participants/parents as home visitors. 5
TOTAL BONUS POINTS 30
Doula Enhancement Criteria Maximum Points
Community Need
  1. The geographic area and community need for doula services are well described (15)
  2. This section reflects coordination with other local HV programs (if applicable) (5)
20
Capacity
  1. Applicant has demonstrated experience in providing culturally responsive doula services in the service area (15)
  2. Staffing indicates programmatic capacity (10)
  3. The coverage plan effectively addresses non-traditional hours and back-up plans (5)
  4. Caseload is within the recommended limits (5)
  5. The plan for providing core services is well described (10)
  6. There is a plan for integrating doulas and home visitors (5)
50
Quality
  1. Staffing is culturally responsive (5)
  2. Effective supervision, including professional development for supervisors, is described (5)
  3. Effective clinical consultation is described (5)
  4. Partnerships are in place to facilitate referrals (5)
  5. Effective partnerships are in place with hospitals or birthing centers (5)
25
Budget is reasonable and necessary, addresses salary requirements ,and includes clinical consultation costs. 5
TOTAL POINTS 100

Applications that fail to meet the criteria described in Section C "Eligibility Information" will not be scored and/or considered for funding.

All applicants / applications determined to be non-compliant or otherwise determined to be disqualified from consideration will be notified in writing, by email, upon determination. This email will be sent to the email addresses provided in the application and will identify the reason for disqualification.

2. Review and Selection Process

Review teams are comprised of up to three (3) individuals. Applications will first be reviewed and scored individually. Then, team members will collectively review the application, their scores and comments. Individual team members may choose to adjust scores to appropriately capture content that may have been missed initially. Scores will then be sent to the application Review Coordinator to be compiled and averaged to produce the final application review team score.

The review team's numerical score may not be the sole award criterion. The Department reserves the right to consider other factors such as: geographical distribution, demonstrated need, location of home visiting slots supported by other funding streams, and agency past performance as a state grantee, etc. While the recommendation of the review panel will be a key factor in the funding decision, the Department maintains final authority over funding decisions and considers the findings of the reviewers to be non-binding recommendations. Any internal documentation used in scoring or awarding of grants shall not be considered public information.

In the event of a tie with insufficient funding for all tied applications, the Department may choose to elect one of the following options:

  • Apply one or more of the additional factors for consideration described above to prioritize the applications; or
  • Partially fund each of the tied applications or
  • Not fund any of the tied applications.

The Department reserves the right to negotiate with successful applicants to adjust award amounts, targets, deliverables, etc.

3. Merit-Based Review Appeal Process

Competitive grant appeals are limited to the evaluation process. Evaluation scores may not be protested. Only the evaluation process is subject to appeal and shall be reviewed by IDHS' Appeal Review Officer (ARO).

Submission of Appeal

Appeals submission IDHS contact information:

  • Name of Agency contact for appeals: Lesley Schwartz
  • Email of Agency contact for appeals: Lesley.Schwartz@Illinois.gov
  • Email Subject Line: 0660 Appeal-Organization Name

An appeal must be submitted in writing to appeals submission IDHS contact listed above, who will send to the IDHS Appeal Review Officer (ARO) for consideration.

  • An appeal must be received within 14 calendar days after the date that the grant award notice has been published.
  • The written appeal shall include at a minimum the following:
    • Name and address of the appealing party;
    • Identification of the grant; and
    • Statement of reasons for the appeal.
    • Supporting documentation, if applicable

Response to Appeal

IDHS will acknowledge receipt of an appeal within fourteen (14) calendar days from the date the appeal was received.

  • IDHS will respond to the appeal within 60 days or supply a written explanation to the appealing party as to why additional time is required.
  • The appealing party must supply any additional information requested by IDHS within the time period set in the request.

Resolution

The ARO shall make a recommendation to the Agency Head or designee as expeditiously as possible after receiving all relevant, requested information.

  • In determining the appropriate recommendation, the ARO shall consider the integrity of the competitive grant process and the impact of the recommendation on the State Agency.
  • The Agency will resolve the appeal by means of written determination.
  • The determination shall include, but not be limited to:
    • Review of the appeal;
    • Appeal determination; and
    • Rationale for the determination.

4. Simplified Acquisition Threshold - Federal Awards

Potential grantees under this funding announcement may receive an award in excess of the Simplified Acquisition Threshold, currently $250,000 (Refer to 2 CFR 200 Section 200.88). Therefore, the grantee is subject to Simplified Acquisition Threshold. Refer to Section C. 8. Grant Funds Use Requirements for more information.

F. Award Administration Information

1. State Award Notices

The anticipated announcement date for this award is May 18, 2022.

Applicants recommended for funding under this NOFO following the above review and selection process will receive a Notice of State Award (NOSA). The NOSA shall include:

  • Grant award amount
  • The terms and conditions of the award
  • Specific conditions, if any, assigned to the applicant based on the fiscal and administrative (ICQ), programmatic risk assessments (PRA) and merit-based review.

Note: The Department cannot issue a NOSA until the successful applicant has an approved budget entered into CSA. The applicant shall receive the NOSA through the Grantee Portal. The NOSA must be signed by the grants officer (or equivalent). This signature effectively accepts the state award amount and all conditions set forth within the notice. This signed NOSA is the document authorizing the Department to proceed with issuing an agreement. The Agency signed NOSA must be remitted to the Department as instructed in the notice.

The notice is not an authorization to begin performance (to the extent that it allows charging to State awards of pre-award costs at the non- State entity's own risk).

A written Notice of Denial shall be sent to the applicants not receiving the award.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

The agency awarded funds shall provide services as set forth in the IDHS grant agreement and shall act in accordance with all state and federal statutes and administrative rules applicable to the provision of the services.

To review a sample of the FY2023 IDHS Uniform Grant Agreement, please visit the IDHS Contracts website.

The agency awarded funds through this Funding Notice must further agree to comply with all applicable provisions of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to nondiscrimination, sexual harassment and equal employment opportunity including, but not limited to: The Illinois Human Rights Act (775 ILCS 5/1-101 et seq.), The Public Works Employment Discrimination Act (775 ILCS 10/1 et seq.), The United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) (42 USC 2000a-and 2000H-6), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 USC 794), The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 USC 12101 et seq.), and The Age Discrimination Act (42 USC 6101 et seq.). Additional terms and conditions may apply.

3. Reporting

Upon execution of the grant agreement, reporting shall be in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Uniform Grant Agreement and related Exhibits which includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Time Period for Required Periodic Financial Reports. Grantee shall submit financial reports to Grantor pursuant to Paragraph 13.1 of the Uniform Grant Agreement and reports must be submitted no later than 15 days after the quarter ends. Submit this report electronically to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov.
  • Time Period for Close-out Reports. Grantee shall submit a Close-out Report pursuant to Paragraph 13.2 of the Uniform Grant Agreement and no later than 15 days after this Agreement's end of the period of performance or termination. Submit this report electronically to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov.
  • Time Period for Required Periodic Performance Reports. Grantee shall submit Performance Reports to Grantor pursuant to Paragraph 14.1 of the Uniform Grant Agreement and such reports must be submitted no later than 30 days after the quarter ends. Submit this report electronically to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov.
  • Time Period for Close-out Performance Reports. Grantee agrees to submit a Close-out Performance Report, pursuant to Paragraph 14.2 of the Uniform Grant Agreement and no later than 30 days after this Agreement's end of the period of performance or termination. Submit this report electronically to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov.
  • Time Period for Required Staffing Reports. Grantee shall submit Quarterly Staffing Reports no later than 15 days after the quarter ends. Submit this report electronically as directed by IDHS.
  • Time Period for Required Data Entry. Participant data for each month must be entered into the IDHS electronic data system by the 5th day of the following month.
  • Other Unique Programmatic Reporting Requirements: Additional annual performance data may be collected as directed by the Department and in a format prescribed by the Department.

4. Payment Terms

It is the policy of the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) that this policy complies with 2 CFR 200.302, 2 CFR 200.305, 31 CFR 205 (procedures implementing Cash Management Improvement Act and Treasury-State Agreement (TSA)), and 44 Ill. Admin. Code 7000.120 (GOMB Adoption of Supplemental Rules for Grant Payment Methods). Three different award payment method exist, namely Advance Payment, Reimbursement, and Working Capital Advance. Each is discussed below:

Advance Payment Method (Advance and Reconcile)

  • An initial payment will be processed in an amount equal to the first two months' cash requirements as reflected in the Advance Payment Requirements Forecast (Cash Budget) Form submitted with the Grantee's application. The initial payment will be processed upon execution of the grantee's Uniform Grant Agreement.
  • Grantees must submit monthly invoices in the format and method prescribed in the Grantee's executed Uniform Grant Agreement. The first invoice is due within 15 days after the first month of the Award's term. Invoices must include only allowable incurred costs that have been paid by the Grantee. For programs that have Grantee matching requirements, allowable costs are only reimbursable when matching costs have also been incurred.
  • Subsequent monthly payments will be based on each monthly invoice submitted by Grantee to Grantor, and will be adjusted up or down, based on a comparison of actual cumulative expenditures to cumulative advance payments, to date.
  • Grantees that do not expend all advance payment amounts by the end of the Award term or that are unable to demonstrate that all incurred costs were necessary, reasonable, allowable, or allocable as approved in their respective budget, must return the funds within 45 days..
  • Grantees may be required to submit supporting documentation for their requests at the request of and in a manner prescribed by the Grantor.
  • Failure to abide by advance payment governance requirements may result in grantee losing their right to advance payments.

Reimbursement Method

  • IDHS will disburse payments to Grantee based on actual allowable costs incurred as reported in the monthly financial invoice submitted for the respective month, as described below.
  • Grantees must submit monthly invoices in a format prescribed by Grantor. Invoices must include all allowable incurred costs for the first and each subsequent month of operations until the end of the Award term. Invoices must be submitted on or before the 15th calendar day following the end of each monthly invoice period. As practicable, Grantor shall process payment within 30 calendar days after receipt of the invoice, unless the State awarding agency reasonably believes the request to be improper.
  • Grantees may be required to submit supporting documentation for their requests at the request of and in a manner prescribed by the Grantor.

Working Capital Advance Method

  • IDHS Grant Program Managers will advance working capital payments to the grantee to cover their estimated disbursement needs for an initial period not to exceed two months of grant expenses. Startup costs may be approved if determined by IDHS Grant Program Managers to be allowable.
  • Grantees must submit monthly invoices for each of the one or two months covered by the Working Capital Advance in the format and method prescribed by the Grantor. The first invoice is due 15 calendar days after the first month of the Award term. Invoices must include only allowable incurred costs that have been paid by the grantee. For grant programs that have grantee matching requirements, allowable costs are only reimbursable when matching costs have also been incurred.
  • Grantees may be required to submit supporting documentation for their requests at the request of and in a manner prescribed by the Grantor.
  • Working Capital Advance Payments are limited to a single occurrence per grant term.
  • Following the initial working capital advance payment, grantees will be paid via advance or reimbursement method as appropriate.

Additional Advance Payments

Additional working capital advance payments may be considered on a case-by-case basis. Such requests must be made in writing, may require supporting documentation and must be approved by IDHS Executive Staff.

Payment Forms

  • Grants Invoice Template
  • Advance Payment Request Cash Budget Form (IL444-4985)

G. State Awarding Agency Contact(s)

Please send all programmatic questions to DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov with "0660 Programmatic FAQ" as the subject header. All questions and answers will be posted to the IDHS Grants webpage for this NOFO.

For administrative questions (e.g. regarding required forms), please contact DHS.HomeVisiting@illinois.gov with "0660 Administrative Question" in the subject header or call (312) 793-1476.

H. Pre-Award Costs

Pre-award costs are/are not allowable.

I. Other Information, if applicable

Technical Assistance

There will be two TA Sessions:

TA Session 1: Bidders' Conference: Wednesday, March 2, 2022, 10am Central Time

Use this Session 1 Link

Meeting Number/Access Code: 246 362 29858

Meeting Password: zkD42qBrtU2

The TA Session 1 recording and the slides are available here at the "Illinois Home Visiting" page of the IgrowIllinois website.

TA Session 2: FAQs: Wednesday, March 16, 2022, 1pm Central Time

Use this Session 2 Link

Meeting Number/Access Code: 246 931 66982

Meeting Password: vAmshSjA833

The TA Session 2 recording and the slides are available here at the "Illinois Home Visiting" page of the IgrowIllinois website.

J. Mandatory Forms