Recovery Oriented Systems of Care

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.

Illinois Department of Human Services/ Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery seeks to develop a recovery-oriented system of care (ROSC) to ensure that an appropriate mix of substance use disorder services and recovery supports for youth, adults and families is available and accessible throughout the state. Moving from the current acute care model to a chronic care approach requires the entire system to embrace a recovery management approach to support those affected by substance use disorders (SUDs) and to expand the current continuum of care.

IDHS/DASA participated in a Policy Academy with several partners to develop a shared vision and settle on some preliminary goals. Representatives were from the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) Illinois Department of Human Services/ Division of Substance Use Prevention and Recovery (SUPR) and Division of Mental Health (DMH), Gift of Voice, the Illinois Certification Board (ICB), Governors State University, the Illinois Family Resource Center, Recovery Education for Families, and the Illinois Association of Extended Care. This group includes several persons with lived experience and involved consultants who have helped design ROSCs in other states. After the Policy Academy, this group formed a Steering Committee to guide the process presenting these ideas for feedback throughout the state in order to build consensus around the ROSC concept in Illinois.

Several opportunities are available for stakeholders to get involved and will be posted here. If you are interested in participating in development of the Illinois ROSC, please contact Rex Alexander Rex.Alexander@Illinois.go

What is Recovery?

  • A process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. (SAMHSA working definition)
  • Recovery from alcohol and drug problems is a process of change through which an individual achieves abstinence and improved health, wellness, and quality of life. (ATR Approaches to ROSC)

Vision

  • People can and do recover
  • Individuals and families determine the supports and services they need.
  • Services and supports are continuous, cohesive across different phases of care and are coordinated across the various agencies involved in their delivery.
  • Support of recovery is a community responsibility and value.
  • There is inherent flexibility in the system so it can be responsive to different pathways to recovery.
  • Measuring quality and outcomes is a system priority.

Values

  • Recognize the right of a person to direct their own recovery and that there are many models of, and paths to, recovery
  • Operate with integrity and a sense of personal responsibility
  • Include the "voice" of peers, family members, and the community in planning and decision-making
  • Implement programs with competency and good stewardship
  • Empower individuals and families
  • Embrace cultural diversity

Goals

  • Building a culture that builds and nurtures recovery
  • Building capacity and infrastructure to support a recovery-oriented system of care
  • Developing commitment to implement and sustain a recovery-oriented system of care

These goals are expanded upon in the Illinois ROSC Action Plan (pdf) and the March 2018 ROSC Summit (pdf).

ROSC Councils

In 2018, IDHS/SUPR initiated several ROSC-ISN projects throughout the state to begin developing local ROSCs.

Professional Certification:

The table below shows credentialing information for Recovery Support Professionals (pdf). For more information, including how to apply, visit the Illinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Professional Certification Association, and click on "Credentialing/Credentialing Forms" at the top.

Board

Certification

Level 

Criteria Degree  

Hours of

Training/

Education  

Supervised Practical Experience   Work Experience Required Examination

Certified Peer Recovery Specialist

(CPRS)

The professional CPRS is recognized as the direct support professional, with formal recovery support services responsibilities available to individuals. The professional CPRS at this level is expected to have knowledge of the principles of recovery and peer support services. Following approved training, CPRS professionals at this level will be able to identify services and activities which promote recovery; articulate points of their own recovery story that are relevant to the obstacles faced by others; promote personal responsibility for recovery; and implement recovery practices in the broad arena of the behavioral health service delivery system.

High School

Or

GED

100 clock hours, total

40 hours* CPRS Specific

16 hours Professional Ethics and Responsibility

44 hours Core Functions

(Must include 5 hours specific to family and 5 hours specific to youth)

100 clock hours of supervision received in the CPRS Domains

2000 hours

(One Year)

Successful score on the

IC&RC

Peer Recovery

Examination

Certified Recovery Support Specialist

(CRSS)

The CRSS professionals are individuals trained to incorporate their unique personal experience in their own recovery with a distinct knowledge base and human service skills. This combination of experience and training allows the CRSS professional to facilitate the recovery and build the resilience of persons with mental illnesses or those dually diagnosed with mental illness and substance use disorder. The knowledge and skill base may be acquired through a combination of specialized training, education and supervised work experiences. CRSS professionals help individuals to address their physical, intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual needs to facilitate and maintain wellness throughout the mental health recovery process. Persons served by a CRSS include persons with mental illnesses, persons dually diagnosed with mental illness and substance use disorder, family members/significant others and/or staff of organizations seeking consultation on the mental health recovery model

High School

Or

GED

100 clock hours

40 hours* CRSS Specific

6 hours Professional Ethics and Responsibility

54 hours Core Functions

100 clock hours of supervision received in the CRSS Domains

2000 hours

(One Year)

Successful score on the CRSS Examination

Certified Veterans Support Specialist

(CVSS)

The professional CVSS is recognized as the direct support professional, with formal Veteran recovery support service responsibilities available to individuals. The professional CVSS at this level is expected to have military cultural competent knowledge of the principles of substance use disorder and mental health recovery and peer support services. Following approved training, CVSS professionals at this level will be able to identify services and activities which promote recovery; articulate points of their own recovery story that are relevant to the obstacles faced by others; promote personal responsibility for recovery; and implement recovery practices in the broad arena of the substance use disorder and mental health service delivery system.

High School

Or

GED

100 clock hours

60 hours* CVSS Specific

(Minimum of 10 hours in each Domain*)

6 hours Professional Ethics and Responsibility

34 hours Topic Areas**

(Minimum of 2 hours in each topic area)

100 clock hours of supervision received in the CVSS Domains

(Minimum of 10 hours in each domain)

2000 hours

(One Year)

Successful score on the CVSS Examination

Certified Family Partnership Professional

(CFPP)

The CFPPs are individuals trained to incorporate their unique. life experiences gained through parenting a child who's emotional and/or behavioral challenges required accessing resources, services and supports from multiple child-serving systems as they progressed toward achievement of the family's goals.

This combination of experience and training allows the CFPPs to empower the family and build resilience in children and families. The knowledge and skill base may be acquired through a combination of specialized training, education and supervised work built upon unique life experiences. CFPPs assist children and families to address their physical, intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual needs to facilitate and maintain wellness through the three-tiered public health model of universal prevention, early intervention, and treatment. The CFPP will serve children and families whose emotional and/or behavioral challenges require resources, services and supports available through multiple child-serving agencies. In addition, CFPPs recognize problems beyond their training, skill or competence, and are carefully trained to refer to appropriate professional service(s)

High School

Or

GED

100 clock hours

40 hours*CFPP Specific

6 hours Professional Ethics and Responsibility

54 hours Core Functions

100 clock hours of supervision received in the CFPP Domains

2000 hours

(One Year)

Successful score on the CFPP Written Examination

National Certified Recovery Specialist

(NCRS)

Extended care recovery professionals are educated in a wide range of disciplines including criminal justice, addictions, social work, health, psychology and other human service disciplines. These are professionals working in extended care settings providing an array of services to alcohol/drug-involved residents. The Extended Care Professional certification is designed to assess an individual's ability to provide support and direction to alcohol/drug involved individuals. It defines an extended care professional's role and function, thus distinguishing these individuals among other health and human service providers.

High School

Or

GED

60 Hours 75 Hours

1000 hours of work experience or

2000 hours of volunteer experience

Successful score on the NCRS Examination

Recovery Residence & Oxford House Directory

Resources

Recovery Housing Environmental Scan (pdf)

William White Papers

Illinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Professional Certification Board

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration- Overview of Recovery and Recovery Support

Recovery Coach Training Program at Governors State University

SAMHSA- Peer Recovery Services (pdf)