18-444-26-1553-01 NOFO State and Regional Substance Abuse Prevention Services (SRSAPS)

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.

Summary Information

1. Awarding Agency Name: Illinois Department of Human Services - Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse
2. Agency Contact: Kimberly Fornero
Kim.Fornero@illinois.gov
401 South Clinton, 4th Floor
Chicago, IL 60607
312.793.1628
3. Announcement Type: Initial announcement
4. Type of Assistance Instrument: Grant
5. Funding Opportunity Number: 18-444-26-1553-01
6. Funding Opportunity Title: State and Regional Substance Abuse Prevention Services
7. CSFA Number: 444-26-1553
8. CSFA Popular Name: State and Regional Substance Abuse Prevention Services
9. CFDA Number(s): 93.959
10. Anticipated Number of Awards: Unknown
11. Estimated Total Program Funding: $3,000,000
12. Award Range $25,000 - $250,000
13. Source of Funding: Federal and State
14. Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
15. Indirect Costs Allowed Yes
Restrictions on Indirect Costs

Yes

If yes, provide the citation governing the restriction: Indirect cost rates for research are unallowable.

16. Posted Date: April 7, 2017 posted the NOFO to grants.illinois.gov
17.Application Range: May 10, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. (noon)
18. Technical Assistance Session: Session Offered: No
Session Mandatory: No

NOFO Supplemental

(Agency-specific Content for the Notice of Funding Opportunity)

A. Program Description

Applicants must address one or more of the following overarching goals that service delivery will focus on in regions and through statewide initiatives in Illinois:

  • Reduce alcohol, marijuana, and other drug use among 12-18 year olds.
  • Reduce alcohol, marijuana, and other drug use among 18-25 year olds.
  • Reduce the non-medical use of prescription drugs by youth and/or adults.
  • Increase and/or maintain participation of public schools in the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS). NOTE: This goal applies to Applicants proposing to target 12-18 year olds.

The personal, social and economic devastation brought about by underage drinking are well documented nationally and in Illinois. Youth under the influence of alcohol can bring about devastating consequences not only in their own lives, but in the lives of their families and communities. According the Centers for Disease Control (www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/alcohol.htm), youth who drink alcohol are more likely to experience:

  • School problems, such as higher absence and poor or failing grades.
  • Social problems, such as fighting and lack of participation in youth activities.
  • Legal problems, such as arrest for driving or physically hurting someone while drunk.
  • Physical problems, such as hangovers or illnesses.
  • Unwanted, unplanned, and unprotected sexual activity.
  • Disruption of normal growth and sexual development.
  • Physical and sexual assault.
  • Higher risk for suicide and homicide.
  • Alcohol-related car crashes and other unintentional injuries, such as burns, falls, and drowning.
  • Memory problems.
  • Abuse of other drugs.
  • Changes in brain development that may have life-long effects.
  • Death from alcohol poisoning.

In general, the risk of youth experiencing these problems is greater for those who binge drink than for those who do not binge drink. Also, youth who start drinking before age 15 years are six times more likely to develop alcohol dependence or abuse (www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm#alcoholismAbuse ) later in life than those who begin drinking at or after age 21 years.

According to the 2014 Illinois Youth Survey State Report (IYS) (iys.cprd.illinois.edu), alcohol is the leading drug of choice compared to all other substances. Among 12th graders, reports of past year use suggest that the top three most commonly used drugs are alcohol, marijuana, and cigarettes. This pattern has been observed since 2008. As youth age, alcohol use increases. Adolescent alcohol use rates do not vary across different types of communities in Illinois (e.g., Chicago, Suburban Chicago, Rural, and Other Urban/Suburban Counties).

In comparison with national estimates, past 30-day alcohol use was higher among Illinois youth (at all grade levels) than their national counterparts in 2013. While alcohol use is on the decline, Illinois' 8th and 12th grade alcohol use is higher than the national average and Illinois 12th graders in 2014 are more likely to report they first regularly used alcohol before age 15 than 12th graders in 2012. Past 30-day use among 8th graders was 14.9% in Illinois, compared to 10.2% nationally; among 12th graders it was 44.4% in Illinois vs. 39.2% nationally. Since 2008, Illinois 8th grade youth past year and past 30-day alcohol use rates have exceeded the national average.

Among 12th graders who have ever used alcohol, more report they used alcohol at least once or twice per month before age 15 in 2014 (16.8%), compared to 2012 (12.7%). This is a concerning trend to monitor as patterns of early regular alcohol use is associated with a higher risk of problems with alcohol later in life. Concerning trends (observed from 2012 to 2014) in beliefs, attitudes, and community conditions that buffer against underage drinking include:

  • Decrease in the belief that adults in their community disapprove of underage drinking among 10th graders.
  • Decrease in belief that their parents disapprove of underage drinking among 12th graders.
  • Decrease in reports that their parents talked with them during the past year about not using alcohol among 12th graders.

According to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/marijuana), marijuana is a topic of significant concern in the United States. There are confusing messages presented by popular culture and media that perpetuate a false notion that marijuana is harmless. This diminishes efforts to keep our young people drug free.

The following is known about the harms associated with marijuana according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

  • Marijuana is classified as a Schedule I drug that poses significant health and safety risks.
  • Harms of marijuana use can manifest in health and quality of life in ways that affect youth and their physical and mental health, cognitive abilities, social life, and [eventual] career status.
  • Marijuana use, particularly long-term, chronic use that begins at a young age, can lead to substance use disorders.
    • - The main active chemical in marijuana is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, more commonly called THC which acts upon specific sites in the brain, called cannabinoid receptors. The highest density of cannabinoid receptors are found in parts of the brain that influence pleasure, memory, thinking, concentrating, sensory and time perception, and coordinated movement.
      • Marijuana's "high" can affect these functions in a variety of ways, causing distorted perceptions, impairing coordination, causing difficulty with thinking and problem solving, and creating problems with learning and memory. Research has demonstrated that among chronic heavy users these effects on memory can last at least seven days after discontinuing use of the drug.
      • Studies reveal that marijuana potency has almost tripled over the past 20 years, raising serious concerns about implications for public health - especially among adolescents, for whom long-term use of marijuana may be linked with lower IQ (as much as an average 8 point drop) later in life.
    • - In 2011, approximately 4.2 million people met the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria for marijuana abuse or dependence. This is more than pain relievers, cocaine, tranquilizers, hallucinogens, and heroin combined. In 2011, approximately 872,000 Americans 12 or older reported receiving treatment for marijuana use, more than any other illicit drug.
      • Research finds that approximately 9% (1 in 11) of marijuana users become dependent.
      • Research indicates that the earlier young people start using marijuana, the more likely they are to become dependent on marijuana or other drugs later in life.
      • In 2010, marijuana was involved in more than 461,000 emergency department visits nationwide. This is nearly 39% of all emergency department visits involving illicit drugs and highlights the very real dangers than can accompany use of the drug.
      • Research also indicates that chronic marijuana use may increase the risk of schizophrenia in vulnerable individuals. High doses of the drug can produce acute psychotic reactions.
    • - The physical effects of marijuana are also far reaching, including its effect on heart and respiratory functions. One study has found that marijuana users have a nearly five-fold increase in the risk of heart attack in the first hour after smoking the drug. A study of 452 marijuana smokers (but who did not smoke tobacco) and 450 non-smokers (of either marijuana or tobacco) found that people who smoke marijuana frequently but do not smoke tobacco have more health problems, including respiratory illnesses, than nonsmokers.

According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health Survey (https://nsduhweb.rti.org/respweb/homepage.cfm ), the following was reported for young adults:

  • About 1 in 5 young adults aged 18 to 25 (19.8 percent) were current users of marijuana.
  • 58.3 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25 were current alcohol users. Binge and heavy use among young adults aged 18 to 25 are of concern. About 2 out of 5 young adults aged 18 to 25 were current binge alcohol users, and 1 out of every 10 young adults were heavy alcohol users.
  • An estimated 829,000 young adults aged 18 to 25 misused pain relievers in the past month, which represents 2.4 percent of young adults.

The illicit drug use estimate for 2015 continues to be driven primarily by marijuana use and the misuse of prescription pain relievers, with 22.2 million current marijuana users aged 12 or older (i.e., users in the past 30 days) and 3.8 million people aged 12 or older who reported current misuse of prescription pain relievers. This increase in marijuana use among people aged 12 or older reflects the increase in marijuana use by adults aged 26 or older and, to a lesser extent, the increase in marijuana use among young adults aged 18 to 25.

Another focus for Illinois will be on the reduction of the non-medical use of prescription drugs. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2015, opioid deaths surged past 30,000 for the first time in recent history (www.samhsa.gov/atod/opioids ). That is an increase of almost 5,000 deaths over 2014.

Historically, opioids have been used as painkillers, but they also have great potential for misuse. Repeated use of opioids greatly increases the risk of developing an opioid use disorder. According to the CDC, 44 people die every day in the United States from overdose of prescription painkillers.

According to SAMHSA:

  • A number of opioids are prescribed by doctors to relieve pain. These include hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine, and codeine. While many people benefit from using these medications to manage pain, prescription drugs are frequently diverted for improper use. In the 2013 and 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 50.5% of people who misused prescription painkillers got them from a friend or relative for free and 22.1% got them from a doctor.
  • As people use opioids repeatedly, their tolerance increases and they may not be able to maintain the source for the drugs. This can cause them to turn to the black market for these drugs and even switch from prescription drugs to cheaper and more risky substitutes like heroin.

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2014:

  • 4.3 million Americans engaged in non-medical use of prescription painkillers in the last month.
  • Approximately 1.9 million Americans met criteria for prescription painkillers use disorder based on their use of prescription painkillers in the past year.
  • 1.4 million people used prescription painkillers non-medically for the first time in the past year.
  • The average age for prescription painkiller first-time use was 21.2 in the past year.

According to the Illinois Youth Survey 2014 State Report - Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Among Illinois Youth (iys.cprd.illinois.edu), use of prescription drugs (without a prescription) is more prevalent than past year use of any illicit drug (excluding marijuana).

  • For 8th graders, it is more prevalent than cigarette use. In 2014, the fourth most common drug use behavior among 12th graders and the third most common drug behavior among 8th and 10th graders is use of prescription drugs without a prescription.
  • More 8th graders (5.4%) and 10th graders (9.2%) report using prescription drugs not prescribed to them in the past year than using cigarettes in the past year (4.9% and 8.9% respectively).
  • While 12.6% of 12th graders report using prescription drugs not prescribed to them in the past year, 8.8% reported use of any illicit drug (excluding marijuana) during the past year.

Observations of attitudes, beliefs, and community conditions that influence decisions to use prescription drugs without a prescription (asked for the first time in 2014) include:

  • Using prescription drugs without a prescription is perceived as risky among adolescents at all grade levels. In comparison with risk perceptions associated with other drugs, youth in 2014 generally view teen misuse of prescription drugs as less risky than cigarette smoking, but more risky than alcohol and marijuana use.
  • The supply source for prescription drugs (without a prescription) varies by age. Among those who have accessed prescription drugs without a prescription in the past year, the most frequently reported supply source for 8th graders is parents providing (53.5%) for 10th graders and someone other than their parents providing (44.2%) and for 12th graders is purchasing from someone (52.2%).

A fourth focus for Illinois will be to increase the administration of the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS). The IYS is a self-report survey administered in school settings and is designed to gather information about a variety of health and social indicators including substance use patterns and attitudes of Illinois youth.

The administration of the IYS has two major goals. The first goal is to supply local data to schools and school districts throughout Illinois. During state-funded survey years (2010, 2012, etc.), the survey is available to all eligible public and private schools in the state at no cost. Each participating school is eligible to receive a report specific to their own students' responses. These local reports provide critical information to school administrators, prevention professionals, and community members as they work to address substance abuse issues in their communities.

The second goal of administering the IYS is to provide a scientific estimate of health and social indicators for the state of Illinois. The scientific estimate is based on drawing a random sample to represent the state population of 8th, 10th, and 12th graders in Illinois public schools.

In previous administrations of the IYS, the statewide scientific sample has been accomplished; however, there is a need to maintain or increase participation to ensure that communities have access to quality data. See Appendix A for maps presenting the 2016 IYS participation by county and Chicago Community Areas (CCAs).

1. Intent of the Notice of Funding Opportunity

The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) is seeking applications from community-based public and private not-for-profit organizations and governmental units to provide substance use disorder prevention services in a region(s) of more than 1,000,000 total residents or statewide.

2. Goals to be Achieved

There are four (4) overarching goals for the SRSAPS. Applicants are required to address at least one of the goals and may address more than one goal.

  • Reduce alcohol, marijuana, and other drug use among 12-18 year olds in urban, suburban, rural and/or other urban areas in Illinois.
  • Reduce alcohol, marijuana, and other drug use among 18-25 year old youth in urban, suburban, rural, and/or other urban areas in Illinois.
  • Reduce the non-medical use of prescription drugs by youth and/or adults in urban, suburban, rural, and/or other urban areas in Illinois.
  • Increase and/or maintain participation of public schools in the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS). NOTE: This goal is only applicable if the Applicant proposes to target a 12-18 year old population.

Goal 1: Reduce alcohol, marijuana and other drug use among 12-18 year olds in the suburban, rural, urban or other urban service area(s) in Illinois.

According to the Illinois Youth Survey 2014 State Report - Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Among Illinois Youth (IYS 2014 State Report), Illinois past 30-day alcohol use rates exceed the national rates at three grade levels.

  • National (2013) vs. Illinois (2014) estimates for alcohol use, 8th-12th grade
    Alcohol - Past 30 days Illinois US
    8th grade 14.9% 10.2%
    10th grade 27.4% 25.7%
    12th grade 44.4% 39.2%
    National (US) data source is Monitoring the Future Study (2013).
    Statistically significant difference between Illinois and US (p less than .05)

At two grade levels, Illinois rates exceed the national rates for marijuana use.

  • National (2013) vs. Illinois (2014) estimates for marijuana use - 8th -12th grade
    Marijuana - Past 30 days Illinois US
    8th grade 7.1% 7.0%
    10th grade 16.6% 18.0%
    12th grade 26.5% 22.7%
  • National (US) data source is Monitoring the Future Study (2013).
    Statistically significant difference between Illinois and US (p less than .05)

Goal 2: Reduce alcohol, marijuana and other drug use among 18 - 25 year olds in suburban, rural, urban and/or other urban areas in Illinois.

Goal 3: Reduce the non-medical use of prescription drugs by youth and/or adults in suburban, rural, urban and/or other urban service areas in Illinois.

Goal 4: Using the map as a baseline, increase and/or maintain IYS participation of public schools, at minimum, in the suburban, rural, urban or other urban communities and counties in Illinois to ensure that at least 70% of the students in each grade (8th, 10th, and 12th) in the public schools participate.
Note: This goal applies to Applicants proposing to target 12-18 year olds.

3. Target Population

SRSAPS targets various populations. The Applicant must select at least one target population from the populations listed below.

Target Populations:

  1. Youth leaders in 6th-12th grades or 12-18 years of age
  2. Municipalities
  3. College students
  4. High school student athletes
  5. Youth (for education) in the 6th-12th grades
  6. Prescribers of opioids

4. Service Area

Applicants are required to apply for and deliver services in a region (municipality and/or multiple counties with a total population of more than 1,000,000 in total population) or across the entire state.
NOTE: This grant will support universal and selected prevention services.

5. Services to be Performed

A. Core Services

SRSAPS Applicants must deliver at least one of the following services:

1. Youth Leaders: Deliver services to develop and support youth leadership with youth in 6th-12th grades or 12-18 years of age aimed at addressing underage drinking, marijuana, and other drugs

  • Recruit and engage schools and community-based providers to develop and administer youth leadership programs.
  • Provide training and technical assistance consultations and include the number that will be conducted with youth (12-18 years of age or 6th-12th grades) and adults and project the number of youth and adults that  will be recruited to participate.
  • Educate adults and youth leaders about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS), the importance of quality data, and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences.
  • Provide resources to enhance and develop the knowledge and skills of the youth and adult leaders related to the delivery of evidence-based prevention programs, practices, and policies.
  • Convene and maintain an advisory council to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
  • Develop and maintain a website with credible resources for youth leaders and adult leaders.
  • Develop and use materials to promote the website and services of the grant.

2. Municipalities: Provide training, tools, and technical assistance to municipalities, law enforcement, and community coalitions and groups working to improve the alcohol environment through an Alcohol Policy Center

  • Develop trainings for local officials about the basics of alcohol policy.
  • Provide workshops to community groups on evidence-based alcohol policy strategies.
  • Participate and present at statewide meetings and conferences targeting law enforcement officials, local officials, criminal justice representatives, and prevention coalitions.
  • Provide tools, analysis, and case studies on alcohol topics relevant to Illinois.
  • Provide technical assistance consultations provided to communities on achieving specific alcohol-related goals.
  • Convene and maintain an advisory council to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed.
  • Develop and maintain a website that contains information about Illinois' alcohol environment and culture, as well as resources designed to help communities review policies that prevent and reduce alcohol misuse.
    • This includes an inventory of municipal ordinances, suggestions on how to examine local policies to determine if they need to be strengthened, and ways to start a community discussion about alcohol issues.
  • Develop and use materials to promote the website and services of the grant.

3. College Students: Provide training and technical assistance to institutions of higher education to engage in alcohol and other drug prevention and participate in the administration of the Core Survey

  • Create a list of all higher education institutions (two and four-year institutions, public and private colleges and universities, and community colleges) and contacts that will need information regarding alcohol and other drugs (e.g., Deans, representatives that operate student health centers).
  • Conduct an assessment with higher education institutions to identify the consumption and consequence issues.
  • Identify and create a training plan to address issues identified.
  • Conduct technical assistance consultations to higher education institutions to address needs.
  • Coordinate, promote, and recruit schools to participate in the administration of the Core Survey.
  • Develop and maintain a website page to provide alcohol and other drug resources and information regarding the Core Survey.
  • Develop and maintain a website with credible resources and website links.
  • Convene and maintain an advisory council to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed.
  • Develop and use materials to promote the website and services of the grant.

For more information regarding the Core Survey: http://core.siu.edu/surveys/index.php

4. High School Student Athletes: Provide substance use disorder prevention information and training to coaches, athletic directors, and parents of athlete about the impact of using alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs

  • Identify and/or develop materials regarding the impact of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs use on athletic performance, overall health, and injuries.
  • Promote the availability of the resources and materials.
  • Determine the content that needs to be shared with coaches, athletic directors, and parents (e.g., dangers of substance use during training activities, impact on athletic performance, signs and symptoms).
  • Identify and create a training plan to educate audiences. 
  • Pilot and deliver training assessing the content and method used to educate at least one audience (e.g. doctors).
  • Educate adults and youth about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS), the importance of quality data, and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences.
  • Provide information regarding effective school policies addressing extra-curricular activities and drug testing and how these resources were promoted.
  • Convene and maintain an advisory council to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed.
  • Develop and maintain a website with available credible resources and promote this website link.
  • Develop materials and use them to promote the website and services of the grant.

5. Youth in 6th-12th grades: Provide evidence and/or science-based educational prevention services to youth in grades 6-12 regarding alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs

  • Provide educational presentations and/or trainings regarding alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs and skill development to 6th-12th graders and include the number of participants targeted.
  • Provide educational materials and resources with adults and/or educators to reinforce the information share during the presentation(s) delivered.
  • Maintain communication with adult leaders and/or educators about the latest resources to reinforce information taught during the presentation(s) and/or trainings.
  • Educate adult leaders and/or educators, at minimum, about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS), the importance of quality data, and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences.
  • Develop and use materials to promote the services of the grant.

6. Prescribers of opioids: Educate prescribers (e.g., doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, pharmacists) about effective prescribing practices, Medication-assisted Treatment (MAT), and referral resources

  • Identify and develop a summary of the promising practices, best practices, and evidence-based practices including new studies related to effective prescribing practices and pain management. This may include identifying the practices conducted by Illinois providers, activities and/or policies adopted in other states, as well as identifying recommendations developed by credible national organizations and federal agencies or their technical assistance contractors for prescribers (e.g., doctors, dentists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists).
  • Identify and create a repository of the available educational materials (e.g., prescribing practices and information regarding the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) and when these resources are used (e.g., during medical school or pre-service, in-service and/or through continuing education).
  • Assess the existing practices and attitudes related to prescribing and related areas (e.g., use of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, referral to substance use disorder treatment, Medication-Assisted Treatment, safe disposal) with at least one audience
  • Assess the available educational resources (e.g., types of content covered and audiences) and determine and summarize the gaps, as well as identify the most effective ways to address the gaps.
  • As needed, develop new materials and/or adapt existing educational materials/curriculum to enhance, expand, or address the identified gaps and for at least one audience(s) (e.g., doctors)
  • Determine effective and innovative methods designed to educate prescribers (e.g., webinars, on-site training and discussion, presenting at meetings and conferences, mentoring, training of trainers, tele-technical assistance).
  • Pilot and deliver prescriber education training assessing the content and method used to educate prescribers with at least one audience (e.g. doctors).
  • Assess the existing practices and attitudes related to prescribing and related areas (e.g., use of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, referral to substance use disorder treatment, Medication-Assisted Treatment, safe disposal). Conduct the survey with at least one audience.
  • Develop an outreach plan for recruiting schools (e.g., medical, dental, nursing, physician assistant, pharmacy) and professionals to participate in the training offerings made available.
  • Convene and maintain an advisory council of stakeholders to obtain feedback regarding services provided and needed
  • Develop and maintain a website to serve as a central repository for posting resources and important information related to prescribing practices and pain management.
  • Develop and use materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.

NOTE:

  • Services may complement, but not duplicate, existing services in the designated service area. Funds may not be used for any treatment services.
  • The Applicant must indicate how direct services identified in the plan will be funded.

B. Additional Required Services

1. Collaboration and Relationship Building with Key Stakeholders

The importance of community collaboration cannot be overemphasized. The key to successful programming is collaborative planning and implementation. Programs must agree to:

  • Collaborate and intentionally network with organizations and individuals.
  • Create working relationships, as well as recruit and collaborate, with key strategic partners and/or stakeholders for the successful delivery of services.

2. Training and Technical Assistance

Programs must agree to receive training, consultation, and technical assistance from authorized representatives of IDHS. The project staff members delivering the prevention services are required to attend regular meetings and specific trainings as required by IDHS and should budget accordingly.

    3. Staffing

    Applicants must recruit, hire, and take necessary steps to retain at prevention staff members who are qualified for their positions through education, experience, and/or training and who are dedicated to the delivery of the SRSAPS program.

    7. Performance Measures, Performance Standards, and Reporting

    For each SRSAPS program, there are corresponding performance measures and standards. The adherence to the performance measures will be assessed using data gathered from various reporting systems and reports: (1) the on-line, web-based reporting system called the Prevention Hub, (2) an Annual Report, and (3) SRSAPS documentation regarding implementation of prevention services. These measures have been selected to reinforce the delivery of quality prevention services that are supported by research and best practices.

    SRSAPS Deliverables, Performance Standards and Performance Measures

    The following information defines the major deliverables, performance standards and performance measures aimed at reaching at least one of the following goals:

    • Reduce alcohol, marijuana and other drug use among 12-18 year olds in suburban, rural, urban and/or other urban areas in Illinois.
    • Reduce alcohol, marijuana and other drug use among 18 - 25 year old youth and young adults in suburban, rural, urban and/or other urban areas in Illinois.
    • Reduce the non-medical use of prescription drugs by youth and/or adults in suburban, rural, urban and/or other urban areas in Illinois.
    • Increase and/or maintain participation of public schools in the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS).
      Note: This goal applies to Applicants proposing to target 12-18 year olds.

    A. Performance Standards by Target Population

    1. Youth Leaders: Deliver services to develop and support youth leadership with youth in 6th-12th grades or 12-18 years of age aimed at addressing underage drinking, marijuana, and other drug use

    • Number of schools and community-based providers recruited and engaged in developing and administering youth leadership programs
    • Number of trainings and technical assistance consultations conducted with youth (12-18 years of age or 6th-12th grades) and adults
    • Number of youth and adults that participate in each training offering
    • Number of activities designed to educate adult and youth about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS), the importance of quality data and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences
    • Number of resources provided to enhance and develop the knowledge and skills of the youth and adult leaders related to the delivery of evidence-based prevention programs, practices, and policies
    • Number of advisory councils convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • Number of websites developed and maintained to provide credible resources to youth leaders and adult leaders
    • Number of materials developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    2. Municipalities: Provide training, tools, and technical assistance to municipalities, law enforcement, and coalitions and community groups working to improve the alcohol environment through an Alcohol Policy Center

    • Number of trainings developed for local officials about the basics of alcohol policy
    • Number of workshops provided to community groups on evidence-based alcohol policy strategies
    • Number of presentations conducted at statewide meetings and conferences targeting law enforcement officials, local officials, criminal justice representatives, and prevention coalitions
    • Number of tools, analyses, and case studies provided on alcohol topics relevant to Illinois
    • Number of technical assistance consultations provided to communities on achieving specific alcohol-related goals
    • Number of advisory council meetings convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • Number of website developed and maintained that contains information about Illinois' alcohol environment and culture, as well as resources designed to help communities review policies that prevent and reduce alcohol misuse
      • Number of content areas covered on the website including an inventory of municipal ordinances, suggestions on how to examine local policies to determine if they need to be strengthened, and ways to start a community discuss about alcohol issues
    • Number of materials developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    3. College Students: Provide training and technical assistance to institutions of high education to engage in alcohol and other drug prevention and participate in the administration of the Core Survey (CS)

    • Number of lists created with all of the higher education institutions (two and four-year institutions, public and private colleges and universities and community colleges) and contacts that will need information regarding alcohol and other drugs (e.g., Deans, representatives that operate student health centers)
    • Number of assessments conducted with higher education institutions to identify the consumption and consequence issues
    • Number of training plans created to address issues identified
    • Number of technical assistance consultations provided to higher education institutions to address the needs
    • Number of technical assistance resources created and/or identified to address the needs
    • Number of activities conducted to coordinate, promote and recruit schools to participate in the administration of the Core Survey
    • Number of website pages developed and maintained to provide credible alcohol and other drug resources and information regarding the Core Survey
    • Number of website maintained with credible resources and website links
    • Number of advisory council convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • Number of materials developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    4. High School Student Athletes: Provide substance use disorder prevention information and training to coaches, athletic directors and parents of athlete about the impact of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

    • Number of materials developed regarding the impact of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs use on athletic performance, overall health and injuries
    • Number of activities conducted to promote the availability of the resources and materials
    • Number of content areas identified of information to be shared with coaches, athletic directors, and parents (e.g., dangers of substance use during training activities, impact on athletic performance, signs and symptoms)
    • Number of training plans created to educate audiences
    • Number of trainings piloted assessing the content and method used to educate at least one audience.
    • Number of activities designed and implemented to educate adult and youth about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences
    • Number of summaries including effective school policies addressing extra-curricular activities and drug testing was developed and number of methods used to promote the summary
    • Number of advisory councils convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • Number of websites developed and maintained with credible resources and the promotion related to website link
    • Number of materials developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    5. Youth in 6th-12th grades: Provide science-based educational prevention services to youth in grades 6-12regarding alcohol, marijuana and other drugs

    • Number of educational presentations and/or trainings regarding alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs and skill development to 6th-12th graders and the number of participants targeted
    • Number of educational materials and resources provided to adult leaders and/or educators to reinforce the information shared during the presentation(s) and/or trainings delivered
    • Number of communication activities with adult leaders and/educators about the latest resources to reinforce information taught during the presentation(s) and/or trainings
    • Number of activities designed to educate adult, at minimum, about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences
    • Number of materials developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    6. Prescribers of opioids: Educate prescribers (e.g., doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, pharmacists) about effective prescribing practices, Medication-assisted Treatment (MAT), and referral resources

    • Number of summaries developed of the promising practices, best practices and evidence-based practices including new studies related to effective prescribing practices and pain management conducted by Illinois providers, activities and/or policies adopted in other states, developed by credible national organizations and/or provided by federal agencies or their technical assistance contractors for prescribers
    • Number of repositories developed with the available educational materials (e.g., information regarding the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) made available to educate prescribers and when the resources are used (e.g., during medical school)
    • Number of surveys conducted with at least one audience to assess the existing practices and attitudes related to prescribing and related areas (e.g., use of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, referral to substance use disorder treatment, Medication-Assisted Treatment, safe disposal)
    • Number of educational resources assessed and summaries developed noting the gaps and the most effective ways for addressing the gaps
    • Number of new and/or adapted existing educational materials enhanced, expanded and/or developed to address the identified gaps and the audience(s) that will be targeted, as needed
    • Number of educational document (e.g., curriculum) developed and/or adapted to educate prescribers (preservice, in-service and/or through continuing education) and target at least one audience, as needed
    • Number of effective and innovative methods designed to educate prescribers (e.g., webinars, on-site training and discussion, presenting at meetings and conferences, mentoring, training of trainers, tele-technical assistance)
    • Number of prescriber education training pilots conducted assessing the content and methods with at least one audience (e.g. doctors).
    • Number of outreach plans developed for recruiting schools (e.g., medical, dental, nursing, physician assistant, pharmacy) and professionals to participate in the trainings made available
    • Number of advisory councils convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • Number of websites developed and used to serve as a central repository for posting resources and important information related to prescribing practices and pain management
    • Number of materials developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    All SRSAP are subject to the following Reporting Requirements:

    8. Quarterly Reporting

    Report the unduplicated population served for the following demographics (age, gender, race, and ethnicity) and time allocated to services for the prevention services using the Program's web-based reporting system called Prevention Hub on a quarterly basis by the established deadlines and managed by the Department's provider.

    9. SRSAPS Annual Report

    Report implementation associated with the evidence-based program(s) in your approved application on an annual basis using the Program's required forms by the established deadlines and determined by IDHS and managed by the Department's provider.

    10. SRSAPS Documentation Reporting of Implementation

    Provide documentation for prevention services delivered by the established deadlines and in the format determined by IDHS and managed by the Department's provider.

    B. Performance Measures

    1. Youth Leaders: Deliver services to develop and support youth leadership with youth in 6th- 12th grades or 12-18 years of age aimed at addressing underage drinking, marijuana, and other drugs

    • 80% of schools and community-based providers recruited and engaged in administering youth leadership programs
    • 90% of the trainings and technical assistance consultations were made available to youth (12-18 years of age or 6th-12th grades) and adults
    • 80% of the youth and adults leaders participated in each training offering
    • 90% of the activities were designed and implemented to educate youth and adult leaders about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS), the importance of quality data and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences
    • 100% of the resources were provided to enhance and develop the knowledge and skills of the youth and adult leaders related to the delivery of evidence-based prevention programs, practices, and policies
    • One advisory council was convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • One website was developed and maintained to provide credible resources to youth and adult leaders
    • At least one document was developed and used to promote the website and services of the grant

    2. Municipalities: Provide training, tools and technical assistance to municipalities, law enforcement, and coalitions and community groups working to improve the alcohol environment through an Alcohol Policy Center

    • 90% of the trainings were developed for local officials about the basics of alcohol policy
    • 90% of the workshops were provided to community groups on evidence-based alcohol policy strategies
    • Participated and presented in at least two statewide meetings and conferences targeting law enforcement officials, local officials, criminal justice representatives, and prevention coalitions
    • 90% of the tools, analyses, and case studies were provided on topics relevant to Illinois
    • 90% of the technical assistance consultations were provided to communities on achieving specific alcohol-related goals
    • At least two presentations were conducted at statewide meetings and conferences targeting law enforcement officials, local officials, criminal justice representatives, and prevention coalitions
    • 100% of the advisory councils meetings were convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • One website was developed and maintained that contains information about Illinois' alcohol environment and culture, as well as resources designed to help communities review policies that prevent and reduce alcohol misuse
      • 90% of the content areas were covered on the website including an inventory of municipal ordinances, suggestions on how to examine local policies to determine if they need to be strengthened, and ways to start a community discuss about alcohol issues
    • At least one document was developed to promote the website and services of the grant

    3. College Students: Provide training and technical assistance to institutions of high education to engage in alcohol and other drug prevention and participate in the administration of the Core Survey (CS)

    • One list was created with all higher education institutions (two and four-year institutions, public and private colleges and universities and community colleges) and contacts that will need information regarding alcohol and other drugs (e.g., Deans, representatives that operate student health centers)
    • One assessment was conducted with higher education institutions to identify the consumption and consequence issues
    • One training plan was created to address issues identified
    • 90% of the technical assistance consultations were provided to higher education institutions
    • 90% of the technical assistance resources created and/or identified to address the needs to address needs
    • 100% of the activities were conducted to coordinate, promote, and recruit schools to participate in the administration of the Core Survey
    • One website page was developed and maintained to provide alcohol and other drug resources and information regarding the Core Survey
    • 90% of the resources and credible website links were maintained on the website
    • One advisory council was convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • At least one document was developed and used to promote the website and services of the grant

    4. High School Student Athletes: Provide substance use disorder prevention information and training to coaches, athletic directors, and parents of athlete about the impact of alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs

    • 90% of the materials were developed regarding the impact of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs use on athletic performance, overall health, and injuries
    • 90% of the activities were conducted to promote the availability of the resources and materials
    • 100% of the content areas were identified of information to be shared with coaches, athletic directors, and parents (e.g., dangers of substance use during training activities, impact on athletic performance, signs and symptoms)
    • At least one training plan was created to educate audiences
    • At least one training was piloted assessing the content and method used to educate at least one audience.
    • 90% of the activities were designed and implemented to educate adult and youth about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences
    • At least one summary including samples of school policies addressing extra-curricular activities and drug testing was identified/developed and at least one method was used to promote this summary resource
    • One advisory council was convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • One website was developed and maintained with credible resources and website links
    • At least one document was developed and used to promote the website and services of the grant

    5. Youth in 6th-12th grades: Provide science-based educational prevention services to youth in grades 6-12 regarding alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

    • 90% of the educational presentations and/or trainings were delivered addressing alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs and skill development to 6th-12th graders and 80% of the participants were served
    • 90% of the educational materials and resources were provided to educators to reinforce the information share during the presentation(s) and/or trainings delivered
    • 100% of the communication activities were conducted with adult leaders and/or educators about the latest resources to reinforce information taught during the presentation(s)
    • 90% of the activities were designed and implemented to educate adults, at minimum , about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences
    • At least one resources was created to promote the services

    6. Prescribers of opioids: Educate prescribers (e.g., doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, pharmacists) about effective prescribing practices, Medication-Assisted Treatment and referral resources

    • At least one summary was developed of promising practices, best practices, and evidence-based practices conducted by Illinois providers, in other states, developed by national organizations, and/or provided by federal agencies or their technical assistance contractors
    • At least one repository was developed with the available educational materials (e.g., prescribing practices and information regarding the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program) to educate prescribers
    • At least one survey was conducted with one audience to assess the existing practices and attitudes related to prescribing and related areas (e.g., use of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, referral to substance use disorder treatment, Medication-Assisted Treatment, safe disposal)
    • At least one summary was developed regarding the educational materials assessed noting the gaps and the most effective ways for addressing the gaps
    • At least one educational document was developed and/or adapted to educate prescribers (preservice, in-service and/or through continuing education) and will target at least one audience, as needed
    • At least one effective and innovative practice was identified (e.g., mentorship programs between hospitals, training of trainers, tele-technical assistance) for at least one audience
    • At least one prescriber education training pilot was conducted and the content and methods with at least one audience (e.g. doctors) was assessed
    • At least one outreach plan was developed for recruiting schools (e.g., medical, dental, nursing, physician assistant, pharmacy) and professionals to participate in the trainings made available
    • One advisory council meeting was convened and held to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed
    • One website was developed and used to serve as a central repository for posting resources and important information related to prescribing practices and pain management
    • At least one document was developed and used to promote the website and the services of the grant

    C. Reporting

    1. Quarterly Reporting

    100% of the quarterly reports were entered providing the unduplicated population served for the following demographics (age, gender, race, and ethnicity) and time allocated to services for the prevention services using the Program's web-based reporting system called Prevention Hub on a quarterly basis by the established deadlines.

    2. SRSAPS Annual Report

    • One Annual Report about the implementation of the evidence-based program(s) in the approved application was submitted by the established deadline.

    3. SRSAPS Documentation Reporting of Implementation

    • 100% of the documentation was submitted by the established deadline.

    B. Funding Information

    1. This NoFO is considered a new application.
    2. In FY2018, IDHS anticipates the availability of approximately $3,000,000 for eligible Applicants.
    3. The maximum award is $250,000 for each state or regional project. The award reflects a 12-month budget period (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018).
    4. Subject to appropriation, the grant period will begin upon the execution of the grant agreement and will continue through June 30, 2018.
    5. Pre-award costs for services in anticipation of an award are allowable where necessary for the efficient and timely performance of the program, and are subject to 2 CFR 200.458. Applicants who have been performing SAPP services since July 1, 2017 must provide proof of services. To be accepted, proof of services must meet the guidelines and requirements outlined within this Notice and must include a signed statement confirming that any Pre-Award costs submitted for reimbursement, if paid by IDHS will not constitute supplanting of funds. Costs for services prior to July 1, 2017 will not be approved. Only Applicants who receive an award as a result of the NoFO and merit-based review process will be eligible for pre-award costs.
    6. Applicants may submit more than one application. Applicants should submit one complete application per service area and target population for consideration.
    7. Unexecuted (not signed) Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be submitted and pre-approved by and on file with IDHS. Subcontractors are subject to all provisions of the Agreement(s). The successful Applicant agency shall retain sole responsibility for the performance of the subcontractor. The unexecuted FY2018 Sub-contract(s), Uniform Budget Template(s) and Budget Narrative(s) must be submitted in Attachment C.

    NOTE: The release of this NoFO does not obligate IDHS to make an award.

    C. Eligibility Information

    1. Eligible Applicant

    This competitive funding opportunity is limited to public and private not-for-profit community-based organizations and local units of government in Illinois that:

    1. Are in good standing with the Secretary of State.
    2. Have completed the GATA pre-qualification process.

    All Applicants are required to provide the requested information as outlined in this NoFO to be considered for funding in FY2018. Successful proposals will serve as the Applicant's program plan and budget for the FY2018 grant period.

    Applicant agencies will not be eligible for a grant award until they have pre-qualified through the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA) Grantee Portal, www.grants.illinois.gov. Registration and pre-qualification are required annually. During pre-qualification, verifications are performed including a check of federal Debarred and Suspended status on the Illinois Stop Payment List and good standing with the Secretary of State. An automated email notification is sent to the entity alerting them of "qualified" status or informs how to remediate a negative verification (e.g., inactive DUNS, not in good standing with the Secretary of State). A federal Debarred and Suspended status cannot be remediated.

    The pre-qualification process also includes a financial and administrative Risk Assessment utilizing an Internal Controls Questionnaire. A programmatic Risk Assessment must also be completed for each separate grant for which an applicant intends to apply. Applications from entities that have not completed the GATA pre-qualification process prior to the due date of this application will NOT be reviewed and will NOT be considered for funding.

    2. Indirect and Direct Administrative Costs: Funding allocated under this grant is intended to provide direct services that impact youth and their families. It is expected that administrative costs, both direct and indirect, will represent a small portion of the overall program budget. Administrative means those activities performed by staff and costs which are supportive of and required for project implementation for which there is no direct client contact such as fiscal staff; audit; clerical support; office rent, utilities, insurance; general office, and equipment. Program budgets and narratives will detail how all proposed expenditures are directly necessary for program implementation and will distinguish between Indirect/Direct Administrative and Direct Program expenses. Any budget deemed to include inappropriate or excessive administrative costs will not be approved. Documentation will be required to verify the approved NICRA. If indirect costs are included in the budget, a copy of the approved NICRA must be included as Attachment C.

    Indirect Cost Rate

    In order to charge indirect costs to the grant, the Applicant organization must have and submit with their application an annually negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA). There are three types of NICRAs:

    • Federally Negotiated Rate. Organizations that receive direct federal funding may have an indirect cost rate that was negotiated with the Federal Cognizant Agency. Illinois will accept the federally negotiated rate. The organization must provide a copy of the federally approved NICRA.
    • State Negotiated Rate. The organization must negotiate an indirect cost rate with the State of Illinois if they do not have Federally Negotiated Rate or elect to use the 10% de minimis rate. If an organization has not previously established an indirect cost rate, an indirect cost rate proposal must be submitted to the State of Illinois through the indirect cost rate system, CARS, within 3 months after the effective date of the award. If an organization previously established an indirect cost rate, the organization must annually submit a new indirect cost proposal through CARS within six months after the close of the grantee's fiscal year. All grantees must complete an indirect cost rate negotiation or elect the de minimis rate in CARS to claim indirect costs. Indirect costs claimed without an established negotiated rate or a de minimis rate election in CARS may be subject to disallowance.
    • De Minimis Rate. An organization that has never received a Federally Negotiated Rate may elect a de minimis rate of 10% of modified total direct cost (MTDC). Once established, the de minimis rate may be used indefinitely. The State of Illinois must verify the calculation of the MTDC annually to accept the de minimis rate.

    If your agency does not have an approved federally negotiated rate or an approved state negotiated rate, then your agency can choose to use to apply no more than the de minimis rate.

    3. Technology: Agencies awarded funds through this NoFO must have a computer that meets the following minimum specifications for the purpose of utilizing the required IDHS reporting forms and the receipt/submission of electronic program and fiscal information:

    • Internet access, preferably high-speed
    • Email capability
    • Microsoft Excel
    • Microsoft Word

    4. Cost Sharing or Matching: Not applicable.

    5. Other Mandatory Requirements: Not applicable.

    Additional Requirements

    Training and Technical Assistance: Programs must agree to receive consultation technical assistance from authorized representatives of IDHS. The program and collaborating partners will be required to be in attendance at TA site visits. Programs will be required to attend regular meetings and training as provided by IDHS or the Department's training provider and should budget accordingly.

    Sectarian Issue: Applicant organizations may not expend federal or state funds for sectarian instruction, worship, prayer, or to proselytize. If the Applicant organization is a faith-based or a religious organization that offers such activities, these activities shall be voluntary for the individuals receiving services and offered separately from the program.

    Background Checks: Background checks are required for all program staff and volunteers who have the potential for one-on-one contact with children and youth. Funded programs will be required to have a written protocol on file requiring background checks, as well as evidence of their completion.

    Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting Mandate: Per the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act (ANCRA, 325 ILCS 5/4), mandated reporters are professionals who may work with children in the course of their professional duties. Mandated reporters are required to report suspected child maltreatment immediately when they have "reasonable cause to believe that a child known to them in their professional or official capacity may be an abused or neglected child" (ANCRA Sec.4). This is done by calling the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) Hotline at 1-800-252-2873 or 1-800-25ABUSE. Programs funded through this grant opportunity must review ANCRA and, where appropriate, have a written protocol for identifying and reporting suspected child maltreatment.

    Other: Not applicable.

    D. Application and Submission Information

    1. Address to Request Application Package: Application materials are provided throughout the announcement. Appendices will be made available in a user/printer friendly format and may be found at the end of this NoFO. Please click on the corresponding link to the right. Additional copies may be obtained by contacting the contact person listed below.

    Contact:
    Kimberly Fornero, Bureau Chief
    Illinois Department of Human Services
    401 South Clinton, 4th Floor
    Chicago, IL 60607
    Kim.Fornero@illinois.gov
    312.793.1628

    Each Applicant must have access to the internet. The IDHS website will contain information regarding the NoFO and materials necessary for submission. Questions and answers will also be posted on the Department's website as described later in this announcement. It is the responsibility of each Applicant to monitor that website and comply with any instructions or requirements relating to the NoFO.

    2. Content and Form of Application Submission

    Application Narrative Content: Applicants must submit an application that contains the information outlined below.

    • Each section must have a heading that corresponds to the headings in bold type listed below.
    • The Applicant must address each numbered sub-point listed in each section.
    • A clearly numbered format that corresponds to the requested information must be used in the response.
    • If the Applicant believes that the subject has been adequately addressed in another part of the application narrative, then provide the cross-reference to the appropriate part of the narrative.
    • The narrative portion must follow the page guidelines set for each section and must be in the order requested.

    Applicant agencies will provide the following information.

    In Attachment A include an Executive Summary and submit with the application. The Executive Summary must include the following information:

    • Full legal name of the Applicant agency
    • Name of the grant, per the NoFO
    • Description of the service area
    • Brief description of the services
    • Total amount of funds your agency is requesting

    A. Capacity - Agency Qualifications/Organizational Capacity (3 pages), 20 points

    The purpose of this section is for the Applicant to present an accurate picture of the agency's ability to provide substance use disorder prevention services in the service area.

    1. A brief description of all services provided by your agency.
    2. A brief description of the staff members that will be responsible for the delivery of the services, including their educational background, years of experience, and other relevant information.
    3. A description of your agency's experience and current programs and activities relevant to the goals, objectives, age groups, and services described.
    4. A description of existing community resources and services, particularly with organizations addressing substance use disorders and related services not provided by the Applicant agency.
    5. Any additional information that the Applicant feels might be relevant to a review in determining the agency's ability to carry out a quality program should be included.
    6. Past Performance (Only completed by Substance Abuse Prevention Programs - Sub-grant D): Provide the following information: description and number of the activities delivered and the numbers of participants served by activity. The Applicant should provide information for fiscal years 2015 and 2016.

    B. Designated Service Area (3 pages), 10 points

    IDHS is interested in gathering information about the service area and the target population the Applicant has requested to serve. Because of the importance of this information, the proposed service area will be reviewed in the context of the application and the State's need for services in that area.

    Provide a description about the service area you intend to serve with the funds awarded through this grant opportunity. Identify the service area your agency plans to target for services and include the following information.

    A clearly numbered format that corresponds to the following points below must be used in the response.

    1. Describe the service area that will be served.
      • Identify the geographic area you plan to serve by indicating the region (municipality and/or counties) or if it is a statewide project.
      • If the Applicant proposes to serve a region, indicate counties and the type of settings (suburban, rural, other urban).
      • If a sub-contractor is serving a part of the service area, identify the region or part of the state that they will serve.
    2. Description of the target population in the service area.
    3. Any unique characteristics about the population in the service area.

    C. Needs Statement (4 pages), 20 points

    For the proposed service area, provide data for each indicator listed below and also include the data source and the year the data represents. Provide the regional or state level data.

    Provide the following information about the service area. For each indicator, provide the data source and the year the data represents. Use the most recent data available and data that best represents the service area.

    1. Describe the need that will be addressed.
    2. Demographic information (e.g., number of schools, hospitals, higher education institutions)
    3. Consumption and consequence data, if applicable.
    4. Other data related to the target population and/or service area.

    D. Description of Program Services (7 pages), 40 points

    Provide the following information regarding the proposed services that will be delivered in the service area. If applicable, describe the services the sub-contractor will deliver.

    1. Youth Leaders: Deliver services to develop and support youth leadership with youth in 6th- 12th grades or 12-18 years of age aimed at addressing underage drinking, marijuana and other drug use

    • Identify the specific goals your agency is aiming to achieve and the target audience(s) to be served.
    • Provide a description of the methods that will be used to recruit and engage schools and/or community-based providers in the administration of youth leadership programs.
    • Provide a description of the trainings and technical assistance consultation services including the number that will be conducted with youth (12-18 years of age or 6th - 12th grades) and adults and project the number of youth and adults that will be served by type of service.
    • Provide a description of the activities designed to educate youth and adult leaders about the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and how it can be used for planning and tracking consumption and consequences.
    • Provide a description of the resources that will be provided to enhance and develop the knowledge and skills of the youth and adult leaders  to plan for and deliver evidence-based prevention programs, practices and/or policies.
    • Provide a description of the advisory council that will be convened to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed; project the number of participants, organizations and individuals that will be recruited to serve on the advisory council, the number of meetings and content that will be covered.
    • Provide a description of the website that will be maintained to provide resources to youth and adult leaders.
    • Provide a description of materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.
    • Provide a timeline, activities, and person(s) responsible for the work associated with the services.

    2. Municipalities: Provide training, tools and technical assistance to municipalities, law enforcement, and coalitions and community groups working to improve the alcohol environment though an Alcohol Policy Center

    • Identify the specific goals your agency is aiming to achieve and the target audience(s) to be served.
    • Provide a description of the trainings that will be developed for local officials about the basics of alcohol policy.
    • Provide a description of the workshops will be provided to community groups on evidence-based alcohol policy strategies.
    • Provide a description of the meetings and/or conferences that will be attended and a description of the content that will be covered in the presentation provided focusing on law enforcement, local officials, criminal justice and prevention coalitions.
    • Provide a description of the tools, analysis and case studies that will be provided on topics relevant to Illinois.
    • Provide a description of the technical assistance consultations that will be provided to communities on achieving specific alcohol-related goals; indicate the projected number.
    • Provide a description of the website that will be developed and maintained that contains information about Illinois' alcohol environment and culture, as well as resources designed to help communities review policies that prevent and reduce alcohol misuse.
      • Provide a description of the content areas that will be covered on the website including an inventory of municipal ordinances, suggestions on how to examine local policies to determine if they need to be strengthened, and ways to start a community discuss about alcohol issues.
    • Provide a description of materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.
    • Provide a timeline, activities, and person(s) responsible for the work associated with the services.

    3. College Students: Provide training and technical assistance to institutions of high education to engage in alcohol and other drug prevention and participate in the administration of the Core Survey (CS)

    • Identify the specific goals your agency is aiming to achieve and the target audience(s) to be served.
    • Provide a description the process for developing the list with all of institutions of higher education (two and four-year institutions, public and private colleges and universities and community colleges) and contacts that will need information regarding alcohol and other drugs (e.g., Deans, representatives that operate student health centers).
    • Provide a description of the assessment that will be conducted with higher education institutions to identify the consumption and consequence issues.
    • Provide a description of the training plan to be created to address issues identified through the assessment.
    • Provide a description of the technical assistance consultations that will be provided to institutions of higher education; project the number of consultations to be provided.
    • Provide a description of the resources that will be made available.
    • Provide a description of the activities that will be conducted related to coordination, promotion and the recruitment of schools to participate in the administration of the Core Survey; project the number of schools that will be recruited.
    • Provide a description of the website that will be developed and maintained to provide credible alcohol and other drug resources, website links, and information regarding the Core Survey.
    • Provide a description for convening the advisory council to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed; project the number of participants, number of meetings, and the content to be covered.
    • Provide a description of materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.
    • Provide a timeline, activities, and person(s) responsible for the work associated with the services.

    4. Student Athletes: Provide substance use disorder prevention information and training to coaches, athletic directors, and parents of athlete about the impact of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs on athletic performance

    • Identify the specific goals your agency is aiming to achieve and the target audience(s) to be served.
    • Provide a description of the materials that will be developed regarding the impact of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs use on athletic performance, overall health and injuries.
    • Provide a description of the activities conducted to promote the availability of the resources and materials.
    • Provide a description of the content areas that will covered.
    • Provide a description for creating a training plan to educate at least one audience.
    • Provide a description of the school policies addressing extra-curricular activities and drug testing that will be identified/developed and promoted.
    • Provide a description for convening the advisory council to obtain feedback regarding the services provided and needed; project the number of members, number of meetings, and the content to be covered.
    • Provide a description of the website that will be developed with available resources and how it will be promoted.
    • Provide a description of materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.
    • Provide a timeline, activities, and person(s) responsible for the work associated with the services.

    5. Youth 6th-12th grades: Provide science-based educational prevention services to youth in grades 6th - 12th grades regarding alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

    • Identify the specific goals your agency is aiming to achieve and the target audience(s) to be served.
    • Provide a description of the educational presentations regarding alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; project the grade levels that will be targeted, the number of presentations by grade level, the number of participants by grade level.
    • Provide a description of the educational materials made available to educators to reinforce the information share during the presentation(s) delivered.
    • Provide a description of the communication activities conducted with educators about the latest resources to reinforce information taught during the presentation(s); project the number of activities and the content to be covered.
    • Provide a description of materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.
    • Provide a timeline, activities, and person(s) responsible for the work associated with the services.

    6. Prescribers of opioids: Educate prescribers (e.g., doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, pharmacists) about effective prescribing practices, Medication-assisted Treatment (MAT), and referral resources

    • Identify the specific goals your agency is aiming to achieve and the target audience (e.g., doctors) to be served.
    • Provide a description of the information that will be identified, assessed and finalized for the summary of promising practices, best practices, and evidence-based practices will be identified and developed, including new studies related to effective prescribing practices and pain management. This may include identifying the practices conducted by Illinois providers, activities and/or policies adopted in other states, as well as identifying recommendations developed by credible national organizations and federal agencies or their technical assistance contractors for prescribers (e.g., doctors, dentists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists).
    • Provide a description of the education materials and related materials that will be identified, assessed and finalized and made available in the repository as well as made available to educate prescribers through preservice during formal training, in-service, and/or through continuing education.
    • Provide a description of how the available resources and gaps will be determined and assessed (e.g., types of content covered), as well as how the most effective ways to address the gaps will be determined.
    • Provide a description of how new materials and/or adapt existing educational materials/curriculum will be developed to enhance, expand, or address the identified gaps.
    • Provide a description of how effective and innovative methods will be designed to educate prescribers (e.g., webinars, on-site training and discussion, presenting at meetings and conferences, mentoring, training of trainers, tele-technical assistance).
    • Provide a description of how existing practices and attitudes will be assessed related to prescribing and related areas (e.g., use of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, referral to substance use disorder treatment, Medication-Assisted Treatment, safe disposal).
    • Provide a description of how an outreach plan will be developed for recruiting schools (medical, dental, nursing, physician assistant, pharmacy, etc.) and professionals to participate in the training offerings made available.
    • Provide a description of how an advisory council of stakeholders will be convened to obtain input regarding the curriculum/educational materials, training and outreach plans, dissemination and communication activities, as well as identify opportunities for partnership and collaboration.
    • Provide a description of how a website will be developed and maintained to serve as a central repository for posting resources and important information related to prescribing practices and pain management.
    • Provide a description of materials to promote the website and the services of the grant.
    • Provide a timeline, activities, and person(s) responsible for the work associated with the services.

    E. Agency Evaluation and Reporting (3 pages), 10 points

    To ensure accountability at all levels of service provision, IDHS is implementing the practice of performance-based contracting with its grantee agencies. The articulation and achievement of measurable outcomes help to ensure that we are carrying out the most effective programming possible.

    Data collected related to performance and outcome attainment will be presented in future funding opportunities and your agency's past performance will be considered when making future funding decisions. At minimum, all Applicants will be expected to collect and report data indicators and measures. The Applicant agency must address the following items related to reporting:

    1. Describe your experience with capacity to conduct process outcome evaluation activities.
    2. Describe the ways your agency organizes and maintains data (i.e., rosters, satisfaction survey, content logs).
    3. Describe your data collection activities related to reporting outcomes.
    4. Describe your capacity to summarize, report, and use data for program planning, improvement, revision, or elimination.
    5. Describe how you have shared information (measures and results) with community stakeholders, institutions, and community representatives for planning and evaluation purposes.

    F. Budget and Budget Narrative (No page limit-include as Attachment A), Not Scored

    Complete the Uniform Grant Budget Template Form found in this NoFO. In addition, provide a detailed Budget Narrative in which you clearly describe how the specified resources and personnel have been allocated for the services and activities described in your application.

    The Uniform Grant Budget Template and Budget Narrative should be prepared to reflect a 12-month budget period (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018); the budget and budget narrative should reflect a 12-month budget period for fiscal year 2018.

    NOTE: Award amounts are estimated at this time and are subject to change.

    1. If indirect costs are included in the budget, a copy of the approved NICRA or the state approved indirect cost rate must be included with the Application as Attachment C.
    2. Funds must be allocated for prevention staff to oversee the project.
    3. Sub-contract budget(s) and narratives must be included with the application as they are considered part of the Applicant's overall budget. Sub-contractor's budget, budget narratives and unexecuted contracts must be submitted with this application as they need to be pre-approved. The format of the sub-contractor's budget and budget must be the Uniform Grant Budget Template.
    4. Completed Uniform Grant Budget Template with two signatures (authorized program representative and fiscal officer, if there is no fiscal officer the Applicant should include a statement indicating there is any such position within their agency) and detailed budget narrative will be included as Attachment B of your application.
    5. In the budget narrative, indicate the amount of grant program funds that will be made available for activities and strategies.
      • - Services may complement, but not duplicate, existing services in the designated service area. Funds may not be used for any treatment services.
      • - The Applicant must indicate how direct services identified in the plan will be funded.

    G. Indicate and describe in detail if the Applicant entity has a current policy and practice of coordinating with local DHS Family and Community Resource Center(s) to advertise job vacancies and hire TANF and SNAP clients. If known, please indicate the number of TANF and SNAP clients that have been hired in recent years. If this is not current policy or practice, and the Applicant intends to seek priority points in this area, please describe the detailed plans of the Applicant to develop and implement such a policy in the future.

    3. Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

    Each Applicant is required to:

    • Be registered in SAM before submitting the application. The following link provides a connection for SAM registration: www.sam.gov.
    • Provide a valid DUNS number in its application.
    • Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times in which the Applicant has an active Federal, Federal pass-through, or State award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal or State awarding agency.

    IDHS may not make a Federal pass-through or State award to an Applicant until the Applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an Applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time IDHS is ready to make the award, IDHS may determine that the Applicant is not qualified to receive the award and use that determination as a basis for making the award to another Applicant.

    4. Submission Dates and Times

    Applications must be received no later than 12:00 p.m. (noon) on May 10, 2017. The application container will be date and time-stamped upon receipt via email. IDHS will not accept applications submitted by mail, overnight mail, diskette, or by fax machine.

    Applicants will receive an email within 48 hours of receipt notifying them that their application was received and if it was received by the due date and time. This email will be sent to the 2 email addresses provided in the application. Applications received after the due date and time will not be considered for review or funding. Applicants are required to notify the Department by May 12 at 12:00 p.m. (noon), if they did NOT receive an email notifying them that their application was received. If the applicant does not receive an email and does not notify the Department by May 12, 2017, their application will be considered a late submission and will NOT be reviewed or scored. The applicant will NOT have the right to protest the submission/receipt of their application to the Department after May 12, 2017.

    Submit the completed grant application to DHS.GrantApp@Illinois.Gov and submit the application electronically on or before May 12, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. Applications must be emailed.

    The subject line of the email MUST state: "18-444-26-1553-01 Kim Fornero SRSAPS".

    To be considered, applications must be emailed by the designated date and time listed above. For your records, please keep a copy of your email submission with the date and time the application was submitted along with the email address to which it was sent. The deadline will be strictly enforced. In the event of a dispute, the Applicant bears the burden of proof that the application was received on date and time and to the email address listed above. As stated above, applicants are required to notify the Department by May 12, 2017at noon, if they did NOT receive an email notifying them that their application was received. If the applicant does not receive an email and does not notify the Department by May 12, 2017 at noon, their application will be considered a late submission and will NOT be reviewed or scored. The applicant will NOT have the right to protest the submission/receipt of their application to the Department after May 12, 2017 at noon.

    5. Funding Restrictions

    1. The grant program is subject to the cost principles found in Subpart E 2 CFR 200.
    2. Examples of unallowable costs include, but are not limited to:
      • Bad debts
      • Contingencies or provision for unforeseen events
      • Contributions and donations
      • Entertainment, alcoholic beverages, gratuities
      • Fines and penalties
      • Interest and financial costs
      • Legislative and lobbying expenses
      • Real property payments or purchases
    3. Grant funds cannot be used for existing services found in the designated service area; IDHS does not support the duplication of services.
    4. The use of a federally-approved indirect cost rate for research is not allowable.

    6. Other Submission Requirements

    1. Application Container and Format Requirements: All applications must be typed on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper using 12-point type and at 100% magnification. Tables may be used to present information with a 10-point type.
    2. The program narrative must be typed single-spaced, on one side of the page with 1-inch margins on all sides. The program narrative must not exceed the page totals specified in Section E: Application and Submission Information, #2 - Content and Form of Application Submission.
    3. The entire application, including appendices, must be sequentially page numbered (hand written page numbers are acceptable). Items included in the Attachments are NOT included in the page limitations. The application narrative is a maximum of 20 pages.
    4. Applicants must submit the application via an email. Submit the application to DHS.GrantApp@Illinois.Gov. The Department is under no obligation to review applications that do not comply with the above requirements.
    5. Successful Applicants will be required to submit a complete electronic version of their approved application and budget.
    6. The Uniform State Grant Application, Uniform Grant Budget Template, and Uniform Grant Budget Template Instructions can be found at the end of this NoFO.
    7. ALL applications MUST include the following mandatory forms/attachments in the order identified below.
      1. Uniform State Grant Application
      2. Application Narrative
        • Capacity - Agency Qualifications/Organizational Capacity
        • Designated Service Area
        • Needs Statement
        • Description of Program/Services
        • Agency Evaluation and Reporting
        • Attachments to Your Application
          • A - Executive Summary
          • B - Uniform State Budget Template with two signatures (authorized program representative and fiscal officer; if there is no fiscal officer, the Applicant should include a statement indicating there is no such position within their agency) AND Budget Narrative.
          • C - Copy of Currently Approved NICRA, state indirect cost rate or an approved indirect cost rate with the State of Illinois IF indirect costs other than the 10% de minimis rate is included in the budget.
          • D - Unexecuted (not signed by either party) FY2017 Sub-Contract(s), Budget(s), and Budget Narrative(s), if applicable.
          • E - W-9

    E. Application Review Information

    1. Criteria: Funding is not guaranteed. All Applicants must demonstrate that they meet all requirements under this NoFO as described throughout. Applications that fail to meet the criteria described in "Eligible Applicants" as identified in Section C "Eligibility Information" will not be scored and considered for funding.

    Review teams comprised of three individuals serving in IDHS will be assigned to review applications. Applications will first be reviewed and scored individually. Scores will be sent to the application Review Coordinator to be compiled and averaged to produce the final application score.

    Application Scoring: Application Narratives will be evaluated on the following criteria:

    Section Scoring
    Executive Summary Not Scored
    Capacity - Agency Qualifications 20 points
    Designated Service Area 10 points
    Needs Statement 20 points
    Description of Program/Services 40 points
    Agency Evaluation and Reporting 10 points
    Budget and Budget Narrative Not Scored
    TOTAL 100 POINTS

    The application criteria to be reviewed and scored are found under each category in this announcement in Section F. "Content and Form of Application Submission".

    NOTE REGARDING LOCAL OFFICE COORDINATION: Up to an additional 5 points will be awarded to agencies whose applications include plans to coordinate with the local DHS Family and Community Resource Center(s) to advertise job vacancies and hire TANF and SNAP clients.

    2. Review and Selection Process: Proposals will be reviewed by a panel established by staff from IDHS. Panel members will read and evaluate applications independently using guidelines furnished by IDHS. Scoring will be on a 100-point scale and up to an additional 5 points for plans to coordinate with local DHS Family and Community Resource Center(s) to advertise job vacancies and hire TANF and SNAP clients. Scoring will not be the sole award criterion.

    While recommendations of the review panel will be a key factor in the funding decisions, IDHS considers the findings of the review panel to be non-binding recommendations. IDHS maintains final authority over funding decisions and reserves the right to consider additional factors, such as geographical distribution of proposed service areas, when making final award decisions.

    Funding decisions will be made based on the quality of an application based on the 100-point scale as described above. Final award decisions will be made by the Secretary, at the recommendation of the Director of the Division, in cooperation with the Bureau Chief. IDHS reserves the right to negotiate with successful Applicants to cover un-served areas that may result from this process.

    If IDHS receives multiple applications to cover the same service area, target population and type of services, the application with the highest score will be considered for funding. IDHS may contact Applicants to obtain clarification regarding the designated service area prior to making any awards. IDHS is not obligated to make any State award as a result of the announcement.

    Merit-Based Evaluation Appeal Process

    1. Competitive grant appeals are limited to the evaluation process. Evaluation scores may not be protested. Only the evaluation process is subject to appeal, and shall be reviewed by the IDHS' Appeal Review Officer (ARO).
    2. Submission of Appeal.
      1. An appeal must be submitted in writing to Kimberly Fornero who will send the appeal to the ARO for consideration.
      2. An appeal must be received within 14 calendar days after the date that the grant award notice has been published.
      3. The written appeal shall include at a minimum the following:
        1. The name and address of the appealing party.
        2. Identification of the grant.
        3. A statement of reasons for the appeal.
    3. Response to Appeal.
      1. IDHS will acknowledge receipt of an appeal within 14 calendar days from the date the appeal was received.
      2. IDHS will respond to the appeal within 60 days or supply a written explanation to the appealing party as to why additional time is required.
      3. The appealing party must supply any additional information requested by IDHS within the time period set in the request.
    4. Resolution
      1. The ARO shall make a recommendation to the Agency Head or designee as expeditiously as possible after receiving all relevant, requested information.
      2. In determining the appropriate recommendation, the ARO shall consider the integrity of the competitive grant process and the impact of the recommendation on the State Agency.
      3. The Agency will resolve the appeal by means of written determination.
      4. The determination shall include, but not be limited to:
        1. Review of the appeal;
        2. Appeal determination; and
        3. Rationale for the determination.

    F. Award Administration Information

    • 1. State Award Notices: Applicants recommended for funding under this NoFO following the above review and selection process will receive a "Notice of State Award Finalist." This notice will identify additional grant award requirements that must be met before a grant award can be executed. These will include one or more of the following:
      • Grantee Pre-Qualification Process
      • Financial and Administrative Risk Assessment - Internal Control Questionnaire
      • Conflict of Interest and Mandatory Disclosures
    • 2. A Notice of State Award (NOSA): A NOSA will be issued to the review finalists that have successfully completed all grant award requirement. Based on the NOSA, the review finalist is positioned to make an informed decision to accept the grant award. The NOSA shall include:
      • The terms and condition of the award.
      • Specific conditions assigned to the grantee based on the fiscal and administrative and programmatic risk assessments.
    • Upon acceptance of the grant award, announcement of the grant award shall be published by the awarding agency to Grants.Illinois.gov.
    • A Notice of Non-Selection as a State Award Finalist shall be sent to the Applicants not receiving awards.
    • The NOSA must be signed by the grants officer (or equivalent). This signature effectively accepts the state award and all conditions set forth within the notice. This signed NOSA is the authorizing document. The Agency signed NOSA must be remitted to IDHS as instructed in the notice.
    • 3. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: The agency awarded funds shall provide services as set forth in the IDHS grant agreement and shall act in accordance with all state and federal statutes and administrative rules applicable to the provision of the services.
    • To review a sample of the FY2018 IDHS contract/grant agreement, please visit the IDHS website at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=29741.
    • The agency awarded funds through this NoFO must further agree to comply with all applicable provisions of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to nondiscrimination, sexual harassment and equal employment opportunity including, but not limited to: The Illinois Human Rights Act (775 ILCS 5/1-101 et seq.), The Public Works Employment Discrimination Act (775 ILCS 10/1 et seq.), The United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) (42 USC 2000a-and 2000H-6), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 USC 794), The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 USC 12101 et seq.), and The Age Discrimination Act (42 USC 6101 et seq.). Additional terms and conditions may apply.
    • 4. Indirect Cost Rate Requirements: In order to charge indirect costs to this grant, the Applicant organization must have an annually negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA). Funding allocated under this grant is intended to provide direct services to youth. It is expected that administrative costs, both direct and indirect, will represent a small portion of the overall program. Documentation will be required to verify the approved NICRA. Refer to Section C. Eligibility Information in this document for additional information regarding indirect cost rate requirements.
    • 5. Reporting:
      1. The Provider will submit monthly expenditure documentation forms (EDFs) in the format prescribed by IDHS. The EDFs must be submitted no later than the 15th day of each month for the preceding month by email.
      2. The Provider will report, at minimum, the programmatic information listed below using the Department's reporting format and by the established deadlines.
        1. Unduplicated number of participants served for demographics (age, gender, race, and ethnicity).
        2. Time allocation for service delivered.
        3. Program service activities - number of sessions/activities, length of sessions/activities, frequency of sessions/activities.
        4. Provider agency administrative information: staffing, sites, subcontracts, and other program information as required.
      3. The Provider will submit one Annual Report regarding implementation of the services and activities in a format prescribed by IDHS and by the established deadline by July 31, 2018.
      4. The Provider will submit audits and/or Financial Reports in a format provided by IDHS and by the established deadlines.

    G. State Awarding Agency Contact(s)

    Questions and Answers: If you have questions related to this NoFO, please send them via email to: Kim.Fornero@illinois.gov with "SRSAPS NoFO" in the subject line of the email.

    NOTE: The final deadline to submit any written questions regarding the SRSAPS - NoFO is May 5, 2017.

    H. Other Information, if applicable

    Clarification for D. Application and Submission Information, A. Capacity - Agency Qualifications/Organizational Capacity, #6 Past Performance:

    The Applicant should provide information for fiscal years 2015 and 2016.

    Mandatory Forms -- Required for All Agencies

    1. GA 1553 FY18 Uniform Application for State Grant Assistance State and Regional Substance Abuse Prevention Services (pdf)
    2. 1553 Appendix A IYS 2016 County and CCA Maps (pdf)
    3. IDHS Grant Forms
    4. Training Presentation (pdf)