Redeploy Illinois Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Released March 26, 2014

Table of Contents

  1. Executive Summary
  2. Program Effectiveness
    1. Recidivism and Cost Benefit Research Findings
    2. The Research
    3. Key Findings
    4. 2013 Performance Measures and Outcomes
    5. 25 % Reduction Requirement
  3. Legislation
  4. Expansion Efforts
    1. Redeploy Illinois Planning Grants
    2. 2013 Redeploy Illinois Program Expansion
    3. Redeploy Illinois Focused Program
    4. Statewide Expansion Analysis
    5. County Eligibility
    6. Redeploy Illinois Eligibility Map
  5. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)
  6. Redeploy Site Assessments
  7. 2012 Cost Benefit Analysis
    1. Individual Site Cost Analysis
    2. 2012 Redeploy Illinois Cost Analysis
    3. 2005-2012 Redeploy Illinois Cost Analysis
  8. Redeploy Youth Participants
    1. Demographic Information
    2. Juvenile Justice System Data
    3. New and Continuing Program Youth
  9. Data Collection & Analysis
  10. Redeploy Case Studies
  11. Site Summaries
    1. Second Judicial Circuit
    2. Macon County
    3. Peoria County
    4. St. Clair County
    5. Fourth Judicial Circuit
    6. Lee County
    7. Madison County
    8. McLean County
    9. LaSalle County
  12. Detention Analysis
  13. Conclusions
  14. Recommendations
    1. Status of 2011 Report Recommendations
    2. 2014 RIOB Recommendations
  15. Appendies
    1. Appendix 1
      1. Youth population in Redeploy Illinois sites, general population for youth ages 13 to 16, CY2010
    2. Appendix 2

Executive Summary

Note: As of the printing of the report, Redeploy Illinois is serving 42 counties through 12 program sites.

Evidence increasingly supports the conclusion that Redeploy Illinois provides a significant return on investment in terms of financial and human resources. The Redeploy Illinois Annual Report presents data, analysis, and findings substantiating this claim. Further, the report highlights efforts related to expansion in new counties and presents the program's activities and highlights during 2012 and 2013.

In financial terms, the average annual cost to serve a youth in the Redeploy program in 2013 was approximately 6% of the annual cost to house a youth in the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (IDJJ). In 2013 the average per capita cost to house a youth at IDJJ was a reported $111,000. In 2013, 352 youth received full Redeploy Illinois program services with an appropriation of $2,385,100. This equates to an annual Redeploy program cost per youth of $6,776.

In 2012, 238 fewer youth were committed to IDJJ because of the Redeploy Illinois program, saving Illinois taxpayers nearly $11.7 million in unnecessary incarceration costs for 2012.

In the first eight years of the program, participating counties sent 1,036 juveniles to IDJJ. This is a steep decline from the projected 2,268 youth that were likely to have been sent based on the previous three-year commitment trend; it represents a 54% reduction in IDJJ commitments over the life of the program. Through 2012, the Redeploy program diverted 1,232 youth saving the state a conservative $60 Million in unnecessary incarceration costs.

From the human perspective, these 1,232 youth were provided with a second chance at becoming a contributing and law-abiding citizen of their respective communities. Beyond saving dollars, the program mends lives. A commissioned report by Illinois State University found that parents and youth believe the program significantly improved family relationships, youth attitudes, communications with youth, and offered opportunities for success. Youth coped with anger better, were more focused on positive goals, and committed substantially fewer crimes. Further, probation staff, service providers, and the judiciary exhibited strong support for Redeploy Illinois.

The research conducted in the pilot programs also concluded that:

  • Redeploy effectively reduced IDJJ Commitments.
  • Redeploy reduces recidivism.
  • Redeploy is less expensive than a commitment to IDJJ.

Program Effectiveness

Recidivism and Cost Benefit Research Findings

The department of Criminal Justice Services at Illinois State University was commissioned by the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board (RIOB) and the Department of Human Services with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding made available by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, to conduct a "Recidivism and Cost Benefit Analysis on the Redeploy Illinois Program."

The Research

The study evaluated the impact of Redeploy Illinois in reducing recidivism and commitments to IDJJ/IDOC from the four pilot sites: Macon County, Peoria County, St. Clair County, and the Second Judicial Circuit (comprising 12 rural counties in southeastern Illinois, for a total of 15 counties) during state fiscal years (FY06- FY10). The evaluation compared the data from three years prior to the Redeploy Illinois program (FY03-FY05) and five years from the start of the program (FY06-FY10) in the four pilot sites.

Key Findings

Reduction in IDJJ Commitments

  • The Redeploy Illinois program reduced overall IDJJ commitments in the four pilot sites by nearly 50% (599 fewer youth) over the five years relative to the three-year baseline average.
  • An initial goal of these pilot sites was to reduce court evaluation commitments. The research found that court evaluation commitments to IDJJ in these sites were reduced by 87% over the five years relative to the three-year baseline average.

Recidivism

  • 73% of the 972 youth accepted into the program over the five years achieved a Successful 66% or Neutral 7% program discharge. 27% were considered unsuccessful.
  • Successful youth had a 27% lower recidivism rate than their unsuccessful counterparts. 389 or 61% of youth successfully completing the Redeploy Illinois Program were not incarcerated during the 3 years following discharge from the program. This compares to 91 or 34% of unsuccessful youth.
  • Fewer than 13% of youth were terminated from the program because they had committed a new offense while in the program.

Cost-Benefits

  • The Redeploy Illinois program cost per youth is five times less expensive than IDJJ full commitment and two times less expensive than IDJJ evaluation commitments.
  • The study showed that the Redeploy Illinois program in the four pilot sites produced five-year savings of $12,604,240.
  • The average cost of the Redeploy Illinois program per youth in the four pilot sites during the time period covered by the study ranged from $3,265 to $16,646.

Additional Findings

  • Interviews with parents and youth indicate that the program significantly improved family relationships, youth attitudes, communications with youth, and offered opportunities for success. Youth coped with anger better, were more focused on positive goals, and committed substantially fewer crimes.
  • Probation staff, service providers, and the judiciary exhibited strong support for Redeploy Illinois.

2013 Performance Measures and Outcomes

All youth referred to the Redeploy Illinois program go through a process to determine if they will be accepted for services. Each program site has its own process to determine eligibility and in some instances sites institute stronger restrictions on eligibility. In each case, youth are assessed to determine their level of risk and service needs.

In 2013, 391 youth were referred to the program and received some level of service. Of those 391 youth, 352 or 90% of the youth referred were accepted into the program for further services. Reasons for non-acceptance of the 39 youth include: 1) Individualized assessments determined that other, non-Redeploy program services were more appropriate; 2) Youth was determined to be non-eligible based on site specific requirements; and 3) Youth was sent to IDJJ or County Detention on pending charges while awaiting program acceptance.

It is expected that all youth that are served in the program will receive an initial YASI assessment; additional assessments as necessary; have an individualized case plan developed and implemented. The following measures demonstrate the extent to which this was accomplished. The data considers only those youth that were discharged during the 2013 calendar year.

  1. 239 Youth exited the program in 2013.
  2. 97% of youth exiting the program had received an initial full YASI assessment.
  3. 100% of assessed youth had an individualized case plan developed.
  4. 75% of youth successfully completed the program.

Although it varies from youth to youth, youth that are successfully discharged from the program have generally completed program goals, are in school and or employed, are more engaged in school, have increased positive peer relations and experience increased family support. Youth that are unsuccessfully discharged generally have failed to meet program requirements and / or have been re-arrested or failed to appear in court or violated a court order. Youth that are neutrally discharged tend to be youth that have been assessed to need other intensive services not provided in the program such as inpatient services or have transferred jurisdictions. In some instances, programs are reporting a youth as neutrally discharged when they have successfully completed probation but not necessarily completed all of their case plan goals.

The Redeploy Oversight Board (RIOB) and staff have been tracking the prevalence of identified mental health and/or substance abuse issues in Redeploy program youth and the extent to which programs are able to provide some level of service to address those identified needs. In some instances youth may be referred to other treatment providers for more intensive services in addition to services provided within the program directly. The figures provided below for the 139 youth that received both an initial assessment and a closing assessment at program discharge during the 2013 calendar year.

  1. 80% of youth were identified to have Mental Health needs. (111 of 139)
  2. 91% of youth with identified Mental Health needs received services to address those needs. (101 of 111)
  3. 53% of youth were identified to have Substance Abuse needs. (73 of 139)
  4. 93% of youth with identified Substance Abuse needs received services to address those needs. (68 of 73)

The following represent reasons identified as to why not all youth receive services to address identified needs: findings were non-contributing; findings were previously addressed; findings are currently being addressed elsewhere; or the service is not available/limited community access.

25 % Reduction Requirement

Each funded Redeploy Illinois program site is required by statute and contract to reduce its commitments to IDJJ by a minimum of 25 % compared to their baseline.

Each program site has an established baseline that is determined by averaging the IDJJ commitment numbers of Redeploy eligible youth for the three years prior to program implementation. There is generally a one year lapse between the baseline years and the program start date. This is largely due to the timing of the release of IDJJ data, the planning and start-up periods, and the RFP and contracting process. This baseline is not readjusted each year.

Some of the Redeploy programs operate on a calendar year and some operate on a fiscal year. For each provider, the most recent available IDJJ commitment data available is from Fiscal Year 2012 and for Calendar Year 2012. An analysis of the eight (8) Redeploy program sites that were operational during 2012 determined that every site was in compliance with the minimum reduction requirement.

In 2012, compared to the 3-year baseline, the eight (8) Redeploy Illinois program sites in operation combined to reduce eligible IDJJ Commitments in their counties by 64 %.

The newest program site, LaSalle County, was operational for less than a full 12-month period during 2012. As a result, the compliance analysis for LaSalle was pro-rated. They too were found to be in compliance.

In late 2013, three new program sites were added: Kankakee; Winnebago and six counties in the 1st Circuit. These programs will not be operational until January 2014 and therefore were not analyzed for compliance.

Legislation

The Illinois General Assembly passed and the governor signed into law Public Act #98-0060 on July 8, 2013. The following language was added to the Probation and Probation Officers Act regarding the section concerning the Redeploy Illinois Program:

"In a County with a population exceeding 2,000,000, the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board may authorize the Department of Human Services to enter into an agreement with that county to reduce the number of commitments by the same percentage as is required by this Section of other counties, and with all of the same requirements of this ACT, including reporting and evaluation, except that the agreement my encompass a clearly identifiable geographical subdivision of that county. The geographical subdivision may include, but is not limited to, a police district or group of police districts, a geographical area making up a court calendar or group of court calendars, a municipal district or group of municipal districts, or a municipality or group of municipalities."

The Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board was supportive of this legislative change as it addressed a significant barrier to implementation of the Redeploy program in Cook County. The vast size and population of this county coupled with very distinct police districts and court calendars were proving to be a near insurmountable challenge to coordinating a county-wide Redeploy program.

The Redeploy Board was in agreement that this legislative change would enable Cook County to design a smaller scale program that would be comparable to programs that are funded in different jurisdictions around the state.

Expansion Efforts

Redeploy Illinois Planning Grants

The Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board (RIOB) requires that counties participate in a planning grant process to establish their eligibility for the program. The Redeploy Planning Grant is a non-competitive grant offered to eligible counties. These $10,000 to $15,000 grants are generally offered for a minimum of three months. Eligible counties are determined based on their Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (IDJJ) commitment data over the preceding three calendar years. Counties that averaged 10 or more Redeploy eligible commitments qualify to participate. In addition, counties with fewer than ten commitments are able to participate when they come in as a group of counties that collectively meet the minimum average of ten commitments.

In 2011, four counties participated in the Redeploy Planning grant process (Sangamon, LaSalle, Tazewell and Ogle Counties). Late in 2011, DHS and the RIOB issued an RFP to fund new program sites. Although there were eight current and former eligible planning grant sites, LaSalle County was the only applicant. They were funded to begin implementation in 2012.

In late 2012 the RIOB issued another round of Planning Grants. As with the 2011 round of Planning Grants, this round was also funded with federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant funds provided to the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA).

Four counties applied and were funded to participate in the planning grant process. They were: Cook County (Court Calendars 55, 58, 60 and 63); the First Judicial Circuit (Union, Jackson, Johnson, Massac, Pope, and Saline); Vermilion County and Winnebago County. The planning grant process concluded June 30, 2013 with final reports submitted by each site.

The RIOB and Redeploy staff worked with each site to guide them in a process that included conducting a needs assessment and data analysis of their current process for responding to the needs of juvenile offenders. Planning grant activities included but was not limited to:

  • individual case data for all youth that were committed over the previous 3 years
  • an assessment of the youth identified needs vs. services actually received
  • identification of needed / unavailable services
  • assessment of services offered in/around the community
  • strategies for service development and delivery
  • identification of potential eligible population
  • local governance of juvenile justice issues
  • data collection and analysis capabilities
  • estimated costs to develop or expand alternatives for delinquent youth
  • an assessment of the system's readiness for such a program
  • feasibility of implementing a Redeploy Illinois program

2013 Redeploy Illinois Program Expansion

On June 19, 2013, utilizing State General Revenue funding, DHS and the RIOB issued a request for proposal (RFP) intended to further expand the program throughout the state. Again, participation in the Redeploy planning grant process was a requirement for eligibility. Eleven current and former planning grant counties met that requirement (Cook, DuPage, Lake, Kane, Kankakee, Stephenson, Sangamon, Tazewell, Union (1st Circuit), Vermilion and Winnebago). Of those eligible planning grant counties, DuPage and Union would have needed to come in with additional counties in order to meet the minimum 3-year average commitment of ten.

Four applications were received by the July 31, 2013 deadline. Those applications were as follows: Kankakee County; Union County (application included Union, Jackson, Johnson, Saline, Massac and Pope Counties); Winnebago County and Cook County (application included four court calendars: 55 (Douglas, Grand Boulevard, Kenwood, Washington Park, Hyde Park and Englewood); 58 (Avondale, Logan Square, Edison Park, Norwood Park, Portage Park, Dunning, North Park, Albany Park, Irving Park, O'Hare Belmont Cragin and Hermosa); 60 (Lincoln Park, Near North Side, Uptown, Lake View, Lincoln Square and Rogers Park); and 63 (Bridgeport, McKinley Park, Brighton Park and Lower West Side).

On August 29, 2013, DHS received a letter from Cook County officially withdrawing their application from consideration.

The remaining applications were funded on October 1, 2013 with program implementation to officially begin in January 2014.

The Redeploy program continues its efforts to expand looking also to existing program sites and working with them to explore the possibility to expanding into additional counties within their circuits that may not otherwise be eligible. This ongoing outreach is proving to be fruitful. The RIOB currently anticipates that an additional 8 counties will begin planning in early 2014.

Redeploy Illinois Focused Program

The Redeploy Illinois Focused Program builds on the success of Redeploy Illinois, recognizing the value of providing services for juveniles that reside in a county that does not meet the statutory criteria for Redeploy Illinois funding. The Redeploy Illinois Focused Program considers funding requests for individualized community-based services to Redeploy eligible youth to avoid commitment to IDJJ. Requests for multiple youth are not considered. Each request must be for a single youth.

County units of government in a county that: 1) does not have a current Redeploy Program, and 2) has committed fewer than 10 Redeploy eligible youth to the Department of Juvenile Justice on average over the previous 3 years are eligible to submit a request for Redeploy Focused funding.

Redeploy Illinois staff screen each application: for completeness to ensure the applicant is eligible and to ensure the application is for a single youth. If accepted, the application is forwarded to the Redeploy County Review Committee, a subcommittee of the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board, for review and consideration for funding. If the County Review Committee decides the application warrants funding, the recommendation will go before the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board for approval.

To learn more about the Redeploy Focused program or to submit an application please visit: http://www.redeployillinois.org/redeploy-illinois-focused-program.

Statewide Expansion Analysis

In response to a recommendation in the 2011 Redeploy Annual Report to develop a rigorous and realistic comprehensive plan to implement the program statewide that includes a feasibility study, data analysis, programmatic and economic incentive models, policy recommendations, an expansion plan and an outreach plan, the RIOB decided to utilize its remaining ARRA funds to do just that. DHS and the RIOB contracted with the University of Illinois, Center for Public Safety and Justice (CPSJ) to research an produce a report that would provide these components necessary for the Board to consider when developing a statewide plan. CPSJ submitted a draft report in late June 2013 and after incorporating suggestions from Board members produced a final report in December 2013. The final report will be presented to the RIOB for acceptance.

The RIOB plans to begin looking into the possibility of a full-scale expansion of the program and is hopeful that this research and subsequent recommendations will assist in the development of a comprehensive plan.

County Eligibility

The Map that follows depicts Redeploy program eligibility as of July 2013. This map shows currently funded Redeploy program sites as well as those that that have previously participated in the Redeploy Planning Grant process. The most currently available 3-year average (CY2010-CY2012) Redeploy eligible commitment number is reflected in each non-funded county.

There are three counties that are eligible to become a Redeploy Illinois site that have not completed a Planning Grant (Adams, Champaign and Rock Island).

There are six counties that are eligible to become a Redeploy Program site AND have also completed the Planning Grant process. These counties are: Cook, Kane, Lake, Sangamon, Stephenson and Vermillion.

There are 57 counties that have committed on average less than 10 Redeploy eligible youth over the previous three years (CY2010-CY2012) and are therefore eligible to request/receive funding under the Redeploy Focused program.

A county or group of counties is eligible to apply to be a Redeploy site so long as their combined 3-year average Redeploy eligible commitments is 10 or greater AND at least one of the counties has previously participated in the Redeploy Planning Grant process.

Redeploy Illinois Eligibility Map

(INSERT State Redeploy Illinois Map)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)

The Department of Human Services' Redeploy Illinois Expansion Grant funded with federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) dollars provided by the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA) concluded on June 31, 2013. This multi-year $800,000 grant successfully accomplished the following objectives:

  • Employing two Redeploy program staff
  • Implementing two (2) Redeploy Illinois Planning Grants
  • Implementing one Redeploy Illinois Expansion RFP
  • Funding one (1) new Redeploy program (LaSalle County)
  • Funding a Recidivism and Cost Benefit Study
  • Funding a Redeploy Illinois Expansion Analysis

Now that the grant has ended, The Department is working to establish a new state staff position to fulfill program coordinator responsibilities. The position is targeted to be filled in late FY2014. The LaSalle program site is now being funded with State General Revenue funds and is expected to continue into the future. The results of the "Recidivism and Cost Benefit Study" are discussed in this report. A draft of the Expansion Analysis was submitted and reviewed by members the RIOB. Comments were submitted and have been incorporated into the final report. It is anticipated that this report will be accepted in early 2014 by the RIOB. Results of this study will not be released until such time as the RIOB accepts the report.

Redeploy Site Assessments

Intensive Redeploy Site Assessments are conducted every three years. The goal is to provide feedback to the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board on the overall implementation experience of the Redeploy Illinois program sites and to inform any subsequent funding decisions made by the Board. The site visits provide important information regarding program milestones and accomplishments, collaboration, case study information, operational and organizational information and the strengths and weaknesses regarding data collection and self-assessment capabilities in the program.

For each Site Assessment, a team of two to four (2-4) Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board Members, and at least one (1) DHS Representative reviews the Redeploy Illinois application(s) and program plan(s), plus any revisions during the 3-year period being reviewed as well as other documentation available from DHS or the program itself reflecting planning, implementation, self-assessment, or program review and modification. This requires an official request to the program for relevant documentation weeks before a site visit.

These comprehensive assessments take place on site and generally take one to two days. While on site, interviews are conducted with Redeploy program staff, parents and/or guardians of the program youth and the youth. Interviews are also conducted with the Chief Judge, the Juvenile Judge(s), the States Attorney, the Assistant State's Attorney(s), the Probation and Court Services Director; the Probation Officer(s), the Juvenile Detention Center Manager, Juvenile Detention Staff, the Mayor and local government officials, and local social service agencies.

During the 2012 and 2013 program years, 3-year site assessments were conducted for the first time with four programs: Madison County, McLean County, Lee County and the 4th Circuit. A second 3-year site visit (6-year) was conducted in Macon County, St. Clair County, Peoria County and the 2nd Circuit.

2012 Cost Benefit Analysis

The Redeploy Illinois program saves the State far more than the average $2.4 million annual appropriation. In the first eight years of the program, participating counties sent 1,036 juveniles to IDJJ state facilities. This is a steep decline from the projected 2,268 youth that were likely to have been sent to IDJJ, based on the previous three-year trend; it represents a 54% reduction in commitments. Given the current $111,000 per capita annual cost to house a juvenile in an IDJJ facility, the savings to state taxpayers are considerable.

In Fiscal Year 2005, when the program began, the per capita cost for a 12-month juvenile commitment was $70,827. The average length of stay for a delinquency commitment was 8.8 months ($51,940) and the average length of stay for a court evaluation commitment was 3.5 months ($20,658). Since 2005, the cost of commitment has increased yearly to $111,000 in 2013*. However, the most current cost data published by the Department of Juvenile Justice continues to reflect 2005 expenses. Therefore, the cost analysis below reflects the 2005 cost information and average lengths of stay by commitment type. For this reason, the analysis below represents a very conservative estimate of savings.

* Annual per-capita cost reported to DHS by IDJJ.

Analysis Methodology

The methodology for calculating the cost avoidance of Redeploy involved several steps:

  1. Compare the baseline eligible commitment number to the observed number of eligible commitments for a given year. The baseline is the average number of eligible commitments reported for a site during the years preceding the award of a Redeploy grant. There is one exception, St. Clair County, for two baselines reused. Because St. Clair County experienced a 150% increase in eligible commitments from 2001 to 2004, the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board allowed St. Clair County to use the single preceding year (2004) as its initial baseline (86 commitments). Beginning in the 3rd year of implementation, the RIOB adjusted the baseline to be the average number of eligible commitments for 2003-2005 (74 commitments). The difference between the baseline and eligible commitments for a given year are considered to be youth who have been diverted from commitment or Redeployed.
  2. Determine among Redeployed youth the number that would have been committed for evaluation and full commitment. According to IDJJ (2005), 9% of new admissions are for a court evaluation. Therefore, the factors of .09 and .91 were applied to the number of Redeployed youth.
  3. The costs associated with commitment were then applied to the number of redeployed youth. The average length of stay for a delinquency commitment was 8.8 months ($51,940) and the average length of stay for a court evaluation commitment was 3.5 months ($20,658).

Individual Site Cost Analysis

2nd Judicial Circuit

Since January 2005, the 2nd Judicial Circuit has redeployed 169 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full-commitment was over $8.3 million.

Table 1 presents the performance of the 2nd Circuit.

Table 1 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year 2nd Judicial Circuit

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
1/1/05 - 12/31/05
22 45% 18 $884,243.16
Year Two
1/1/06 - 12/31/06
30 25% 10 $491,246.20
Year Three
1/1/07 - 12/31/07
20 50% 20 $982,492.40
Year Four
1/1/08 - 12/31/08
15 63% 25 $1,228,115.50
Year Five
1/1/09 - 12/31/09
13 68% 27 $1,326,364.74
Year Six
1/1/10 - 12/31/10
18 55% 22 $1,080,741.64
Year Seven
1/1/11 - 12/31/11
17 58% 23 $1,129,866.26
Year Eight
1/1/12 - 12/31/12
16 60% 24 $1,178,990.88
8 Year Figures 151 Youth
Committed
53% 169 Fewer Youth
Committed
$8,302,060.78

Note:  Baseline number of eligible commitments = 40

Mason County

Since January 2005, Macon County has redeployed 219 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full-commitment was more than $10.7 million.

Table 2 presents the performance of Macon County.

Table 2 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year Macon County

Program Period Eligible Commitments %Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
1/1/05 - 12/31/05
30 41% 21 $1,031,617.02
Year Two
1/1/06 - 12/31/06
12 76% 39 $1,915,860.18
Year Three
1/1/07 - 12/31/07
18 65% 33 $1,621,112.46
Year Four
1/1/08 - 12/31/08
23 55% 28 $1,375,489.36
Year Five
1/1/09 - 12/31/09
32 37% 19 $933,367.78
Year Six
1/1/10 - 12/31/10
36 29% 15 $736,869.30
Year Seven
1/1/11 - 12/31/11
24 53% 27 $1,326,364.74
Year Eight
1/1/12 - 12/31/12
14 73% 37 $1,817,610.94
8 Year Figures 189 Youth
Committed
54% 219 Fewer Youth
Committed
$10,758,291.78

Note: Baseline number of eligible commitments = 51.

Peoria County

Since July 2005, Peoria County has redeployed 204 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full commitment was over $9.2 million.

Table 3 presents the performance of Peoria County.

Table 3 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year Peoria County

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
7/1/05 - 6/30/06
48 39% 30 $1,473,738.60
Year Two
7/1/06 - 6/30/07
49 37% 29 $1,424,613.98
Year Three
7/1/07 - 6/30/08
49 37% 29 $1,424,613.98
Year Four
7/1/08 - 6/30/09
60 23% 18 $85,422.34
Year Five
7/1/09 - 6/30/10
42 46% 36 $1,768,486.32
Year Six
7/1/10 - 6/30/11
55 60% 23 $1,129,866.26
Year Seven
7/1/11 - 6/30/12
39 50% 39 $1,915,860.18
7 Year Figures 342 Youth
Committed
37% 204 Fewer Youth
Committed
$9,222,601.66

Note: Baseline number of eligible commitments = 78.

St. Clair County

Since July 2005, St. Clair County redeployed 406 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full commitment was more than $19.8 million.

Table 4 presents the performance of St. Clair County.

Table 4  Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year St. Clair County

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
7/1/05 - 6/30/06
62 28% 24 $1,178,990.88
Year Two
7/1/06- 6/30/07
20 77% 66 $3,242,224.92
Year Three
7/1/07 - 6/30/08
11 85% 63 $3,094,851.06
Year Four
7/1/08 - 6/30/09
10 86% 64 $3,143,975.68
Year Five
7/1/09 - 6/30/10
13 82% 61 $2,996,601.82
Year Six
7/1/10 - 6/30/11
10 86% 64 $3,143,975.68
Year Seven
7/1/11 - 6/30/12
10 86% 64 $3,143,975.68
7 Year Figures 136 Youth
Committed
75% 406 Fewer Youth
Committed
$19,854,595.72

Note: Baseline for years one and two = 86 and for year three and beyond = 74.

Lee County

Since January 2009, Lee County has redeployed 40 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full-commitment was nearly $2 million.

Table 5, below, presents the performance of Lee County.

Table 5 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year Lee County

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
1/1/09 - 12/31/09
1 91% 10 $491,246.20
Year Two
1/1/10 - 12/31/10
1 91% 10 $491,246.20
Year Three
1/1/11 - 12/31/11
1 91% 10 $491,246.20
Year Four
1/1/12 - 12/31/12
1 91% 10 $491,246.20
4 Year Figures 4 Youth
Committed
91% 40 Fewer Youth
Committed
$1,964,984.80

Note: Baseline number of eligible commitments = 11

McLean County

Since January 2009, McLean County has redeployed 63 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full-commitment was almost $3.1 million.

Table 6, below presents the performance of McLean County.

Table 6 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year McLean County

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
1/1/09 - 12/31/09
10 57% 13 $638,620.06
Year Two
1/1/10 - 12/31/10
11 52% 12 $589,495.44
Year Three
1/1/11 - 12/31/11
7 70% 16 $785,993.92
Year Four
1/1/12 - 12/31/12
1 96% 22 $1,080,741.62
4 Year Figures 29 Youth
Committed
68% 63 Fewer Youth
Committed
$3,094,851.04

Note: Baseline number of eligible commitments = 23

Madison County

Since January 2009, Madison County has redeployed 59 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full-commitment was nearly $2.9 million.

Table 7, below presents the performance of Madison County.

Table 7 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year Macon County

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
1/1/09 - 12/31/09
32 6 1 $49,124.62
Year Two
1/1/10 - 12/31/10
20 39 13 $638,620.06
Year Three
1/1/11 - 12/31/11
14 58 19 $933,367.78
Year Four
1/1/12 - 12/31/12
7 79 26 $1,277,240.12
4 Year Figures 73 Youth
Committed
45% 59 Fewer Youth
Committed
$2,898,352.58

Note: Baseline number of eligible commitments = 33

4th Judicial Circuit

Since January 2009, the 4th Judicial Circuit has redeployed 72 youth. The cost avoidance of diverting these youth from a court evaluation or full-commitment was over $3.5 million.

Table 8 presents the performance of the 4th Circuit.

Table 8 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Year 4th Judicial Circuit

Program Period Eligible Commitments % Reduction from Baseline Number Redeployed Cost Avoidance
Year One
1/1/09 - 12/31/09
30 35% 16 $785,993.92
Year Two
1/1/10 - 12/31/10
25 46% 21 $1,031,617.02
Year Three
1/1/11 - 12/31/11
27 41% 19 $933,367.78
Year Four
1/1/12 - 12/31/12
30 35% 16 $785,993.92
4 Year Figures 112 Youth
Committed
39% 72 Fewer Youth
 Committed
$3,536,972.64

Note: Baseline number of eligible commitments = 46

2012 Redeploy Illinois Cost Analysis

Table 9, below, presents the most recent available year's cost analysis and reduction percentages for each of the Redeploy sites. For St. Clair County and Peoria County, the program period is FY2012; for the remaining sites the program period is CY2012.

During the 2012 program period, 118 youth were committed to IDJJ from Redeploy Illinois counties. According to the previous trend/baseline data, this represents a 67% reduction from the estimated 356 youth who would otherwise have been sent to IDJJ during this period. In 2012 238 fewer youth were committed to IDJJ, saving Illinois taxpayers nearly $11.7 million in unnecessary incarceration costs.

Table 9 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Site Most Recent Year Available (2012)

Site Name Baseline
Number
Redeploy Eligible
Commitments
Number
Redeployed
% Reduction
from Baseline
Cost Avoidance
2nd Circuit 40 16 24 60% $1,178,990.88
Macon 51 14 37 73% $1,817,610.94
Peoria 78 39 39 50% $1,915,860.18
St. Clair 74 10 64 86% $3,143,975.68
Lee 11 1 10 91% $491,246.20
McLean 23 1 22 96% $1,080,741.62
Madison 33 7 26 79% $1,277,240.12
4th Circuit 46 30 16 35% $785,993.92
TOTALS 356 118 238 67% $11,691,659.54

*Baseline - This figure is calculated as follows: the individual site baseline number times the number of years of program implementation

** Number of data years in the Redeploy Program - 2nd Judicial and Macon 8 years. Due to FY data use Peoria and St Clair only have 7 years of data. Lee, McLean, Madison and 4th Circuit have 4 data years.

2005-2012 Redeploy Illinois Cost Analysis

Redeploy Illinois began as a pilot project in four sites and by 2012 had expanded to eight sites covering 28 counties. These programs have provided individualized intensive services to nearly 1,600 youth during this period. Prior to implementation in these counties, on average, 356 youth eligible for Redeploy services were being committed to IDJJ each year. Because of Redeploy Illinois, these counties have instead committed 164 youth per year on average since 2005, a 54% reduction from the previous trend.

Table 10 depicts the overall cost analysis and reduction percentages for each of the Redeploy sites since the program began in 2005. For St. Clair County and for Peoria County the data is reflected through June 30, 2012; for the remaining sites the data is reported through December 31, 2012. Table 10 further indicates that an estimated 2,268 youth would have been committed to IDJJ based on the previous trend data. Since implementation began, 1,036 Redeploy eligible youth were committed to IDJJ from these counties. This represents a 54% reduction or 1,232 fewer youth being committed to IDJJ, saving Illinois taxpayers an estimated $59.6 million in unnecessary incarceration costs.

Table 10 Cost Avoidance Resulting from Redeploy Illinois, by Site 2005 - 2012

Site Name** Baseline
Number *
Redeploy Eligible
Commitments
Number
Redeployed
% Reduction
from Baseline
Cost Avoidance
2nd Circuit 320 151 169 53% $8302,060.78
Macon 408 189 219 54% $10,758,291.78
Peoria 546 342 204 37% $9,222,601.66
St. Clair 542 136 406 75% $19,854,595.72
Lee 44 4 40 91% $1,964,984.80
McLean 92 29 63 68% $3,094,851.04
Madison 132 73 59 45% $2,898,352.58
4th Circuit 184 112 72 39% $3,536,972.64
TOTALS 2268 1036 1232 54% $59,632,711

Redeploy Youth Participants

The information that follows describes the youth who participate in the Redeploy Illinois program. The data analyzed are from calendar year 2012 and were reported by providers to the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority through cumulative monthly statistical reports for the Redeploy Illinois program. These reports capture intake, demographic and legal history of the youth being served. Also provided here is general information about the needs of these youth as determined through an array of screenings and assessments. Together, these data paint a picture of the youth served by the program.

Presented below is a look into the demographics, legal status and juvenile justice system history for the 260 new youth enrolled in the Redeploy program during 2012. Information about services and assessments conducted during the year is also provided for both new and continuing program youth.

Demographic Information

The two charts below provide a depiction of the Redeploy Illinois program youth served compared to that of the general youth population in those Redeploy program sites. The general youth population statistics are derived from census data. See Appendix 1.

Figure 1 Youth 13-16 Redeploy Illinois site population, 2010

Figure 1 Youth 13-16 Redeploy Illinois site population, 2010

Youth 13-16 Population Percent
African American 14,035 17%
Caucasian 67,736 81%
Mixed/Other 1,595 2%

Note: 3,705 youth were Hispanic (4% of total)

Figure 2 New juvenile Redeploy Illinois clients, 2012

Figure 2 New Juvenile Redeploy Illinois Clients, 2012

New Juvenile Number Percent
African American 78 30%
Caucasian 159 61%
Mixed/Other 22 8%
Unknown 1 Less than 1%

Note: 16 youth were Hispanic (6% of total)

The results of the above reflect the fact that minority youth are overrepresented in the Juvenile Justice System. The data reflect that the Redeploy program has been successful at serving those overrepresented youth.

  • 61% of youth served in the program were Caucasian compared to 81 % of the population.
  • 30% of youth served in the program were African American compared to 17% of the population.
  • 6% of youth served in the program were Hispanic compared to 4% of the population.

Table 11 below looked at the 260 new youth that were enrolled in the Redeploy program during 2012.

Table 11 New Program Youth by Age and Gender, 2012

Age Male Female Total
Under 10 0 0 0
10 - 12 2 0 2
13 - 14 55 11 66
15 37 19 56
16 63 24 90
17 32 7 39
18 or older 4 3 7
Unknown 0 0 3
Total 193 64 260
  • 74% of all new youth served during 2012 were male and 24% were female.
  • 56% of all new youth served during 2012 were 15 or 16 years old.
  • The most common youth served was a 16 year old male.

Juvenile Justice System Data

Of the 260 new youth enrolled into the program in 2012, 179 had been charged with committing felony offenses while 125 were charged with misdemeanor offenses. By statute, felonies are classified by seriousness of offense (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-10). Class X and Class M are the most serious offense levels and youth charged with these offenses are not eligible for the juvenile Redeploy Illinois program. Class 1 felonies are the most serious and Class 4 felonies are the least serious. Felonies are classified, for the purpose of sentencing, as follows:

  • Class 1 (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-30), sentence of 4 to 15 years
  • Class 2 (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-35), sentence of 3 to 7 years
  • Class 3 (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-40), sentence of 2 to 5 years
  • Class 4 (730 ILCS 5/5.4.5-45), sentence of 1 to 3 years

Table 12 below shows the breakdown of the number of youth charged with different offenses by seriousness of offense (class level). It is important to remember that youth may have been charged with more than one offense.

Table 12 Number of Youth by Offense Type and Class, 2012

Person Property Drug Sex Other Violations TOTAL % of Total
Class X felony* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Class M felony* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%
Class 1 felony 2 20 0 2 0 1 25 7.8%
Class 2 felony 8 70 2 0 0 2 82 25.5%
Class 3 felony 23 10 0 1 2 2 38 11.8%
Class 4 felony 8 20 3 0 2 1 34 10.6%
Class A misdemeanor 39 57 11 1 2 0 110 34.2%
Class B misdemeanor 0 4 2 0 0 0 6 1.9%
Class C misdemeanor 4 0 4 0 0 1 9 2.8%
Status offense 0 0 2 0 7 1 10 3.1%
Other 0 0 0 0 4 4 8 2.5%
TOTAL 84 181 24 4 17 12 322 100.0%
% of Total 26.1% 56.2% 7.5% 1.2% 5.3% 3.7% 100.0%

* Ineligible for Redeploy Program services.

  • The most common offense type reported were property offenses, followed by person offenses, then drug offenses.
  • The most common offense classes reported were Class A misdemeanors, followed by Class 2 felonies.
  • The majority of person and drug offenses were Class A misdemeanors while the majority of property offenses were Class 2 felonies.
    • Most of the 181 property offenses committed were Class 2 felonies (39%), followed by Class A misdemeanors (31%), and Class 1 and Class 4 felonies (11% each).
    • Most of the 84 person offenses committed were Class A misdemeanors (46%), Class 3 felonies (27%), and Class 2 and Class 4 felonies (10% each).
    • There were 24 drug offenses committed and almost half of those were Class A misdemeanors.
  • There were relatively few clients charged with sex and other types of offenses, as well as violations of parole, probation, or pre-trial conditions.
  • Overall, there were 10 youth admitted into Redeploy Illinois on status offenses.

Tables 13 and 14 below provide both the legal status and legal history of the youth served in the program. It is important to note that each table includes data on the 260 new youth enrolled into the Redeploy program in 2012. However, in both tables youth may fall into more than one category. For example, a youth may be on probation AND in the process of completing community service at the time of admission to the program. In addition, percentages were calculated using the total number of new clients by gender as the denominator.

Table 13  Legal Status of Redeploy Youth at Admission, 2012

Legal Status # of all males (n=193) # of all females (n=64) # of total (n=260)*
Conditional discharge 0 0 0
Continued under supervision 15 5 20
Court supervision 25 8 33
Diversion program 1 2 3
Parole 1 0 1
Has pending court case 20 3 23
Probation 150 35 185
Completing public service work 14 3 17
Pending adjudication 18 0 18
Has pre-trial conditions in place 12 6 18
DCFS involved 3 4 7

*Gender was not reported on 3 youth and therefore data are not included above.

Table 14 Prior History of Youth in the Redeploy Illinois Program, 2012

Prior history % of all males (n=193) % of all femailes (n=64) % of total (n=260)*
Has prior station adjustments 5% 5% 5%
Has prior arrests 77% 52% 70%
Referred to court - no detention 25% 40% 29%
Referred to court - with detention 43% 22% 37%
Referred to court - IDJJ commitment 1% 0% Less than 1%
No criminal history 9% 18% 11%

*Gender was not reported on 3 youth and therefore data are not included above.

When considering the two tables above:

  • 72% of youth served were on probation/parole at the time of admission to the program (186).
  • 21% of youth served were on court supervision at the time of admission to the program (53);
  • 70% of youth served had prior arrests on their record (181);
  • 37% of youth served had prior secure detention stays (97): and
  • 11% had no criminal history (29).

New and Continuing Program Youth

All youth involved in the Redeploy Illinois program receive Risk Assessment utilizing the YASI (Youth Assessment Screening Instrument) that determines their risk of re-offending. This assessment/screen also considers risk factors in several different domains. This instrument is used not only to develop an individualized case plan but also identifies areas in potential need of further more in-depth assessments. Screenings and assessments are completed prior to entering the program, they may be court ordered, and will also be conducted on an as needed basis while in the program. Screenings and assessments determine a variety of potential issues including behavioral, mental health, substance, abuse, exposure to trauma, and other issues. Of those screened and assessed during 2012, the most common conducted were mental health, substance abuse, and behavioral. Table 15 shows the number of screenings and assessments completed for the youth in program above and beyond the YASI during the time period studied. It is important to note that a single youth may receive multiple screens.

Table 15 Number of Screenings and Assessments/Issues Found - 2012

Screen/Assessment Category Screens Found
# that underwent fitness/competency evaluation 8 4
# screened/assessed for mental health/behavioral issues 144 82
# screened/assessed for substance abuse status 141 104
# screened/assessed for co-occurring disorders 24 8
# screened/assessed for trauma issues 63 24
# screened/assessed for sex offender issues 6 4
# screened/assessed for other drug use not listed above 13 5

Table 16 below provides examples of the types of services provided to Redeploy youth in the Redeploy program and the frequency for which those services were reported used.

Table 16 Services Provided to Redeploy Illinois Youth by Service Type

Type of service male female total
Total number of clients receiving substance abuse services/treatment: 425 56 481
outpatient drug/alcohol treatment 374 43 417
inpatient drug/alcohol treatment 110 27 137
other substance abuse treatment 19 0 19
Total number of clients receiving mental health services/treatment: 651 170 821
psychological treatment (includes medication monitoring) 187 65 252
outpatient mental health treatment 286 73 359
inpatient mental health treatment (hospitalization) 7 11 18
psychiatric evaluation 41 5 46
other mental health treatment 21 7 28
Total number of clients receiving cognitive therapy/treatment: 632 154 786
anger management 335 94 429
cognitive behavioral 212 67 279
cognitive education 4 2 6
WAIT/ART 117 31 148
other cognitive therapy 78 14 92
Total number of clients receiving restorative services/treatment: 517 64 581
youth court/peer jury 15 9 24
victim mediation panel 0 0 0
required to pay restitution 172 5 177
required to complete community service 396 58 454
other restorative services 4 0 4
Total number of clients receiving family focused services/treatment: 737 162 899
family advocacy 557 114 671
domestic violence 38 30 68
functional family therapy 74 14 88
multi-systemic therapy 109 43 152
services through DCFS 55 11 66
other family focused services 112 27 139
Total number of clients receiving education/job training/life skills services: 836 154 990
alternative education 430 67 497
education/workforce placement 302 64 366
life skills 648 105 756
mentoring services 314 43 357
other education/job training/life skills 23 3 26
Total number of clients receiving services/treatment related to sex offenses: 12 18 30
services to treat a sex offender 11 0 11
services to treat a victim of a sex offense 7 18 25
Total number of clients receiving other services/treatment not captured above: 283 57 340
gender specific services 10 12 22
recreation 82 11 93
other 291 40 331

In addition to the services provided above, individual counseling or therapy was used 1,451 times. Youth can fall into more than one main category. For example, a youth may have received both mental health services and restorative services and would be counted once in each main category. Youth can fall into more than one sub-category within each main category. For example, during the course of his Redeploy program, a youth may be receiving both inpatient and outpatient treatment for substance abuse treatment. In this case, the youth would be counted in both the inpatient and outpatient categories. Therefore, there may be instances where the total number of youth by subcategory does not equal the total number of youth served tallied in the main category. Youth may have received started and stopped treatment several times throughout the year. These youth would be counted more than once and may account for the discrepancies in those numbers.

Data Collection & Analysis

In 2012 the RIOB and staff discovered that several Redeploy program sites had serious deficiencies in the area of data collection and analysis. This became evident during the Illinois State University's Recidivism and Cost Benefit Analysis of the program. The principle investigator conducting the research was forced to manually collect data that should have been readily available at the sites. Staff began to look into the issue with the study sites as well as the other program sites.

These deficiencies were present in multiple sites and apparently went relatively unnoticed as sites annually reported various data elements to DHS and were submitting cumulative quarterly and then monthly data reports to the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA). Staff at both ICJIA and DHS had noticed data inconsistencies but believed that the majority of the issue was due to the way questions were worded in the monthly data reports and the fact that programs were asked to report cumulative rather than participant specific data. In 2011 and 2012 ICJIA staff had worked with providers to redesign the monthly report in hopes to resolve some of the data inconsistencies. While improvements were noticed with the implementation of a new monthly report in 2012, there continue to be data concerns.

Redeploy staff began to address the issues in a number of ways:

  1. Technical Assistance - Staff from ICJIA began reaching out to providers offering technical assistance regarding data collection and analysis for the monthly reports. DHS and ICJIA Staff provided data sessions at annual Redeploy All-Sites meetings.
  2. Program Development - DHS staff pulled together managers from all of the Redeploy program sites to develop a Redeploy Logic Model and Performance Measures. After a number of weeks and several in-person all day meetings, everyone was in agreement and the program had a new set of performance measures and a logic model. Both of these items were incorporated into contracts for FY2014.
  3. Web-Based Reporting System - While programs continue to report data to ICJIA utilizing the revised monthly report, DHS staff began the process of developing a new reporting mechanism that will capture participant specific data rather than cumulative data. While this is a very time intensive and lengthy process, all of the pre-development work has been completed and the phase one development is nearing a test stage. It is anticipated that all system development and testing will be complete and rolled out with the new FY15 fiscal year. Once this phase is complete, the administrative side of the system will be developed out and put in place. Staff have received positive feedback from providers and it is anticipated that this new system will significantly reduce the administrative burden currently on providers to prepare monthly data reports and annual plan data. DHS and the RIOB have high hopes for this process as it will create the capacity not only to analyze overall program data, performance and outcomes but will also give the RIOB and individual program sites the ability to assess individual youth outcomes. The system will also enable more effective program management and decision making. Finally, the system will create the platform for measuring recidivism in a number of ways. Progress on the development and implementation of this data reporting system will be included in future annual reports.

Redeploy Case Studies

Harry,

"Harry" was a grade school student with grown-up, adult problems. Dad had not been consistently in his life since he was a toddler, and mom was usually gone at one of her three jobs just trying to feed her children. Harry was left to care for his two younger sisters when mom was gone; however, when she went out the front door, Harry usually went out the back.

Harry was mad at the world. He refused to follow mom's rules and stole from her or her boyfriend whenever he got the opportunity. Harry stole from anyone and everyone when the opportunity arose. Harry came and went as he saw fit and often did not come home. Harry regularly screamed and swore at his mother and sisters. The house was always in chaos and extremely stressful. His mother would find knives hidden in his bedroom. Harry admitted that he used marijuana and smoked cigarettes and he defied anyone to stop him.

School was painful for Harry. He often earned three to four Conduct Reports a week. Harry would take his anger out on his classmates and teachers. He called his teachers filthy names and bullied his peers. Harry felt he had a right to take anything he wanted from whoever had something he wanted. Ultimately Harry was caught stealing from a friend's parent and the crime was reported. Along with other incidents, Harry was put on probation for burglary.

Harry demonstrated a lack of respect for others as he bullied often and was constantly breaking rules. He displayed no empathy for his victims or affection for anyone. He was out-of-control, oppositional, and very angry. His sisters did not act anything like Harry and mom was truly close to breaking. Harry found himself in legal trouble, and facing expulsion from his school due to his aggressive behaviors.

Harry's probation officer recommended him to the Redeploy program because he had no idea what else to do with him. He had blown out of every other program they had tried. Harry was a tough kid to get through to and an even tougher kid to like. After extensive work with the Redeploy treatment team that included intensive family work and cognitive behavioral therapy among others, Harry's behavior and demeanor began to improve. While the family was completing the groups and coaching sessions, the team worked with mom to develop new parenting skills and a contract to address Harry's high risk behaviors.

One Sunday afternoon Harry and two of his friends were walking along the banks of the Illinois River when they came across a man slumped over in his boat. Harry rushed to the man's aid and realized he was not breathing. Thinking quickly, Harry ran a quarter of a mile to where they had seen a Conservation Ranger and summoned him to help the man. The stranger had suffered a heart-attack. He was administered CPR while emergency services were on their way. The stranger survived and identified Harry as his hero.

The staff in the Redeploy program was elated and pleasantly shocked when they heard of Harry's heroism. The "old" Harry would not have thought twice of frisking the stranger for money, taking his phone and credit cards, and then walking away as he laughed at the man's misfortune. Harry demonstrated a compassionate, caring nature the staff had initially doubted he was capable of. Harry was recognized and touted as a hero in his community. The Redeploy staff was there when Harry was awarded a Hero's Plaque from the city.

Julie,

"Julie," 14, came from a family that had been involved with social services her entire life. Julie's mother left her father and their four children when Julie was just two years old.

Julie was a very angry girl. She was in constant conflict with her family and began to pull away from them. Dad used the only ways he knew to "control" Julie, screaming at her, swearing at her or slapping her.

Julie spiraled out of control, quit coming home and engaged in criminal behavior; she was arrested many times. Julie finally landed in detention. The court ordered Julie and her father to participate in the Redeploy Illinois Program.

The Redeploy Illinois service provider had previously worked with this family under another program and was familiar with their circumstances. Conflict and dysfunction in the family had gone on for generations. Julie's dad came from a very poor family of nine; he had never known any love or affirmation, just severe abuse and survival. But, he had a loving heart and wanted a different life for his children. He just had no idea how to make that happen.

Program staff began utilizing a model program that focuses on the family. It helps families learn to show love and care for one another while also establishing an appropriate parent-child relationship where parents are teaching and correcting behaviors. There are six scheduled weekly group sessions along with a therapist that engages the family at home in coaching sessions. These coaching sessions may take several weeks to complete.

Before long, the family began to demonstrate significant changes. Dad initiated the techniques he learned and real change began to occur. Julie came home after school, she started doing her homework; trust was building. She is performing well in school no longer consigned to special education due to her oppositional, aggressive behavior. Julie even made the cheer leading squad!

Site Summaries

The descriptions that follow depict unique aspects of the program from site to site. Yet, there is a clear and common thread among the descriptions that the communities served by Redeploy are committed to keeping youth in the community rather than in confinement or detention. With the exception of the most recently funded sites: Kankakee, Winnebago, and the 1st Circuit (Union, Jackson, Johnson, Pope, Massac and Saline), the following discussion presents brief descriptions of Redeploy Illinois programs throughout the state.

Second Judicial Circuit

The Second Judicial Circuit comprises the 12 rural counties throughout southeastern Illinois: Edwards, Richland, Lawrence, Crawford, White, Wabash, Gallatin, Hardin, Jefferson, Wayne, Franklin and Hamilton

The Second Judicial Circuit Redeploy exists as a partnership between court, probation, and community service providers. A local consortium of stakeholders oversees the Second Circuit Redeploy program. While the Jefferson County Board serves as the fiscal agent for the program, One Hope United is the lead agency.

Youth are referred to the Redeploy program by the court or by probation. A Youth Assessment Screening Instrument (YASI) is completed for each youth to identify his/her risk level and to determine what services would be appropriate in order to meet the youth's needs. The youth must have a risk level of medium or high and be at least 13 years of age. Once eligibility is determined, the probation officer refers the youth to the appropriate Redeploy service; this referral is made directly to the service provider.

Services available through Second Judicial Circuit Redeploy include psychological and psychiatric evaluations; MST; offense specific cognitive education/therapy classes; GED testing; and WAIT.

Macon County

Macon County Redeploy exists as a partnership among court, probation, and community service providers. This partnership, known as the Work Group, is responsible for development and direct oversight of programs, services, and processes in the day-to-day business of the initiative.

The intake and assessment process utilized for Redeploy Illinois is two pronged. Referrals may come through the court process or by direct referral from Probation. When a case is referred to Probation from the Court, probation conducts the initial intake immediately following a court hearing. Following assessments, including the YASI, and home visits, Probation recommends the case to the court. The Juvenile Court Judge is the final authority on who is accepted Redeploy Illinois. A Macon County Probation officer is assigned to supervise Redeploy Illinois clients.

After acceptance, Redeploy provides home intervention services. Emergency needs such as utilities, food and clothing are identified and addressed. Transportation is provided as needed for court appearances, school, counseling and doctor appointments. Internal case management services and linkage to community-based services also are provided. Macon County Redeploy implemented a 10-week parent support group. Community service opportunities are offered such as lawn care services for elderly and/or disabled individuals. Finally, Redeploy provides youth and their families with Substance Abuse Treatment and Mental Health Services.

Peoria County

Peoria County Probation and Court Services partners with the Children's Home Association of Illinois to serve as the lead agency for the program. The intake process starts with a referral from the County Juvenile Probation Office and the Juvenile Court Judge makes final decisions on acceptance into the program. Once the referral is received, a Youth Counselor and the Assessment Clinician are assigned. The Assessment Clinician contacts the family and conducts several assessments. Based on these assessments, the program provides services for the youth and family that may include counseling through the use of FFT, individual counseling, mentoring, tutoring, groups, such as anger management (WAIT), social skill building, and employment.

Another key component of the program is that the staff works with the youth and family to locate resources that will assist them with being successful not, only while enrolled in services, but even after the Redeploy services have terminated.

St. Clair County

In St Clair County Probation partners with Children's Home and Aid to serve as the lead agency for the program. The partnership includes the Probation Department, Juvenile Court, One Hope United, Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities (TASC), Chestnut Health Systems. The lead agency also actively participates in the Juvenile Justice Council and the St. Clair County Youth Coalition.

All youth considered by the Juvenile Court for placement in IDJJ are referred to Redeploy for an assessment. A Social Study Investigation is completed for each referral. The assessment identifies strengths and gaps in services. A family contract is developed that specifies goals as well as a supervision plan for this youth should he/she be allowed to remain in the community. The Juvenile Judge makes the ultimate decision on whether a youth may participate in Redeploy.

St. Clair County Redeploy has MST, drug treatment providers and WAIT available to youth. Employment and Developmental Disability Services are critical services that are sought for youth when needed.

Fourth Judicial Circuit

The Fourth Judicial Circuit encompasses Christian, Clay, Clinton, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Marion, Montgomery, and Shelby Counties. The Redeploy program serves these counties.

The Redeploy program is a partnership among court, probation, and community service providers. The Redeploy program has a local consortium of stakeholders: State's Attorneys, public defenders/guardians ad litem, chief probation officers, juvenile probation officers, juvenile judges, associate judges, educators, law enforcement, service agencies, Department of Children and Family Services caseworkers, and staff of the Department of Human Services.

When a youth is committed to IDJJ, the probation officer conducts a thorough assessment to help determine if youth are appropriate for the Redeploy Illinois program. This happens following adjudication and/or when a plea agreement has been reached. The officer considers the youth's police records, probation records, YASI score, social history, and/or meetings with family members or significant others. The court makes the final decision regarding a youth's enrollment in the Redeploy.

The probation department takes the lead role as juvenile officers, referring and arranging services youth and maintaining contact with service providers, to review case progress and services planning.

Lee County

The Lee County Probation Department is the lead agency and as such assumes responsibility for fiscal oversight. Partners in the Redeploy initiative are the Juvenile Court Judge, Assistant State's Attorney, and Public Defender. The Lee County Juvenile Justice Council (JJC) is used as the forum to meet with juvenile justice stakeholders. The membership of the Council consists of representatives from the court, schools, police, faith-based, service providers and other community entities.

Eligibility is determined when a minor is referred to Lee County Probation. At this point, the minor receives a risk assessment utilizing the Youth Assessment and Screening Instrument (YASI). If mental health or substance abuse issues are identified through the assessment process additional assessments are requested and provided by the local mental health agency. Those individuals with an overall risk score in the medium to high range are targeted for staffing into the Redeploy Program. During the staffing, the youth's risk and protective factors are shared and discussed to determine appropriate placement into the program.

Lee County Redeploy provides the following services: intensive family interventions utilizing the "Parenting with Love & Limits" curriculum; an individualized plan for each high risk youth; interventions to address criminal attitudes, values and beliefs; utilization of the National Institute of Corrections' "Thinking for a Change" curriculum; case management services (provided by the Probation Officer); employment assistance; and structured free time activities.

Madison County

Madison County began its Redeploy program in 2009. Children's Home and Aid also serves as the lead agency for Madison County Redeploy. The agency partners with the county Probation Department, Juvenile Court, One Hope United, Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities (TASC), and Chestnut Health Systems.

All youth considered by the Juvenile Court for placement in IDJJ are referred to Redeploy for an assessment. A Social Study Investigation is completed for each referral. The assessment identifies strengths and gaps in services. A family contract is developed that specifies goals as well as a supervision plan for this youth should he/she be allowed to remain in the community. The Juvenile Judge makes the ultimate decision on whether a youth can participate in Redeploy.

Madison County Redeploy has MST, drug treatment providers and WAIT available to youth. Employment and Developmental Disability Services are critical services that are also sought for youth when needed. Electronic leg monitors may be used as a step down process or as a sanction for youth.

McLean County

The lead agency for this Redeploy program is the McLean County Juvenile Court Services. Redeploy partners with Community Stakeholders (minors, parents/guardians, and treatment providers) and Juvenile Justice Stakeholders (Juvenile Judge, State's Attorney, public defender, and juvenile probation).

Delinquent minors are referred to the program by any of the Juvenile Justice Stakeholders. Once referred, McLean County Probation Deputy Director(s) will convene a meeting with the referring member to determine eligibility. Once eligibility is determined, a meeting of Community Stakeholders is convened; an individualized service plan is created. Services available are Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (substance abuse treatment), tele-psychiatry, crisis counseling, family counseling, parenting group, cognitive behavioral groups, crisis intervention services, GED preparation, Adult Basic Education, Employability Skills, and English as Second Language.

In November 2011, services were extended as a prevention measure for those youth who qualify for Redeploy services but do not need the intense supervision. The process is the same as full Redeploy; the "preventative" clients receive the same benefits as full clients.

LaSalle County

LaSalle County Probation and Court Services partners with the Youth Service Bureau of Illinois Valley (YSBIV) who serves as the lead agency for the Redeploy program. YSBIV, Probation and stakeholders are all members of the LaSalle County Juvenile Justice Council. The probation department, in concert with the Juvenile Judge, State's Attorney and the appointed Public Defender refer a youth to the Redeploy program. All youth considered by the Juvenile Court for placement in IDJJ are referred to Redeploy for assessment. An extensive assessment is conducted with each youth to determine: level of risk for further aggression and delinquent behavior; diagnosis; amenability for treatment and prognosis for intervention; and recommendations with regard to community supervision and clinical management.

LaSalle County Redeploy offers a number of services including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT); Aggression Replacement Therapy (ART); Parenting With Love and Limits, intensive case management; transportation; advocacy; referral and linkage. Most services are provided in the youth's home and community.

Detention Analysis

While the goal of Redeploy Illinois is to reduce the number of system-involved youth committed to IDJJ correctional facilities, the program is not intended to result in an increased use of local, secure detention placements. Although preferable to incarceration, secure detention is not an effective community-based intervention strategy for these youth.

The primary intent of the detention analysis presented here is to assess the possibility that detention is being used intentionally in lieu of IDJJ commitments in an effort to ensure a site's compliance with the required 25% reduction.

Overall, in 2013, the average length of stay for juveniles at detention centers statewide was 19.7 days, (a 20% increase) over the Redeploy baseline years (2001-2003), while the 9 Redeploy sites experienced a combined average length of stay of 14.9 days (a 2% increase) over the 9 years since implementation began. In that same period the State saw an increase in new detention admissions of 23% while Redeploy sites averaged a 12% decrease. Further, statewide detention centers experienced a 44% increase in average daily population, while Redeploy sites averaged a 13.4% decrease.

Figures 3 - 6 present detention admission data for the State and the three Redeploy funding cohorts: 2005, 2009 and 2012. The data presented in the figures and subsequent analysis suggest that Redeploy Illinois has not resulted in an intentional increased reliance on local secure detention centers as a means of meeting the 25% reduction requirement for IDJJ commitments.

The newest Redeploy Site (LaSalle County), however, has detention numbers that were concerning and prompted the need for additional analysis and follow-up. The data reflects a dramatic upward trend in detention admission that began in 2011 and continued to increase in 2012 (Redeploy began in April 2012). Program staff began to further investigate the situation and address the concerns with the site. It appears that the upward trend is not directly related to Redeploy implementation as it began in advance of the program start. Although staff and Board members will continue to work with and monitor the site's detention use closely, the data does seem to suggest marked improvement in 2013 as compared to 2012.

Another Redeploy site, the Second Circuit also has seen an increase in detention admissions during the years since the program began. This was of concern in past analysis and further investigations revealed that the influx in admissions was largely due to a Juvenile Management Information System (JMIS) reporting deficiency that in late 2011 was corrected for future entries. The JMIS system was counting youth receiving treatment in a non-secure wing of the facility as new secure detention admissions. A look at the 2012 and 2013 detention admissions for this site compared to their baseline years reveals only a 9% increase in new admissions rather than the 28% increase the data shown when including those non-secure admissions. It is also important to point out that during this same period, from 2005 - 2013 compared to 2001-2003 the State averaged a 23% increase in new admissions.

Data utilized to provide the analysis of detention statewide and by site can be found in (Appendix 2).

Figure 3 Statewide Detention Admissions CY2001-2013

Statewide Detention Admissions CY2001-2013

Redeploy Site CY2001 CY2002 CY2003 CY2004 CY2005 CY2006 CY2007 CY2008 CY2009 CY2010 CY2011 CY2012 CY2013
Statewide 11,029 10,899 10,154 9,795 9,808 13,589 15,745 15,243 13,842 13,641 12,803 12,020 11785

Figure 4 Detention Admissions-2005 Sites (CY2001-2013)

Detention Admissions-2005 Sites

Redeploy Site CY2001 CY2002 CY2003 CY2004 CY2005 CY2006 CY2007 CY2008 CY2009 CY2010 CY2011 CY2012 CY2013
Macon 338 228 195 169 175 192 167 200 221 179 187 138 140
Peoria 726 804 821 876 849 806 769 739 664 607 536 539 455
St. Clair 890 815 747 702 623 787 604 573 431 571 436 574 579
2nd Circuit 260 252 212 299 335 332 312 304 293 344 328 253 278

Figure 5 New Admissions-2009 Sites (CY2005-2013)

New Admissions-2009 Sites

Redeploy Sites CY2005 CY2006 CY2007 CY2008 CY2009 CY2010 CY2011 CY2012 CY2013
Lee 22 8 10 12 11 11 9 9 6
Madison 393 395 402 342 333 356 422 389 343
McLean 186 219 205 214 194 189 156 180 145
4th Circuit 182 191 179 126 109 134 157 214 184

Figure 6 Detention Admissions - 2012 Sites (CY2008-CY2013)

Detention Admissions - 2012 Sites

Redeploy Site CY2008 CY2009 CY2010 CY2011 CY2012 CY2013
LaSalle 140 157 100 152 203 176

Conclusions

Redeploy Illinois began as a pilot project in four sites and by 2012 had expanded to eight sites covering 28 counties. These programs have provided individualized intensive services to nearly 1,600 youth during this period. Prior to implementation in these counties, on average, 356 youth eligible for Redeploy services were being committed to IDJJ each year. Because of Redeploy Illinois, these counties have instead committed 164 youth per year on average since 2005, a 54% reduction from the previous trend. That is 1,232 fewer youth being committed to IDJJ over this 8-year period saving Illinois taxpayers an estimated $59.6 million in unnecessary incarceration costs.

A 2012 cost analysis of the program indicated that these 28 counties, during the 2012 program period, redeployed 238 youth saving Illinois taxpayers nearly $11.7 Million in unnecessary incarceration costs.

Research by the department of Criminal Justice Services at Illinois State University (ISU) found that parents and youth believe the program significantly improved family relationships, youth attitudes, communications with youth, and offered opportunities for success. Youth coped with anger better, were more focused on positive goals, and committed substantially fewer crimes. Further, probation staff, service providers, and the judiciary exhibited strong support for Redeploy Illinois.

The following ISU research conclusions were also made:

  • Redeploy effectively reduced IDJJ Commitments. Overall IDJJ commitments in the four pilot sites reduced commitments by nearly 50%. Court evaluation referrals to IDJJ were reduced by 87% and full commitments were reduced by 10% over the period of the study.
  • Redeploy reduces recidivism. Successful Redeploy program youth had a 27% lower recidivism rate than their unsuccessful counterparts.
  • Redeploy is less expensive than a commitment to IDJJ. The Redeploy Illinois program cost per youth is five times less expensive than IDJJ full commitment and two times less expensive than IDJJ evaluation commitments.

Below is a snapshot of the Redeploy program youth served in 2012.

  • 56% of youth served were 15 or 16 years of age.
  • 56% were being charged with committing felony offenses.
  • 78% of the male youth were on probation at the time of admission into the program.
  • 55% of the female youth were on probation at the time of admission.
  • 77% of the male youth had prior arrests at the time of admission.
  • 52% of the female youth had prior arrests at the time of admission.
  • 43% of the males had prior detention center stays at the time of admission.
  • 22% of the female youth had prior detention center stays at the time of admission.

An analysis of the eight (8) Redeploy program sites that were operational during 2012 determined that every site was in compliance with the minimum 25% reduction requirement. The newest program site, LaSalle County, was operational for less than a full 12-month period during 2012. As a result, the compliance analysis for LaSalle was pro-rated. They too were found to be in compliance.

The Redeploy Oversight Board (RIOB) and staff have been tracking the prevalence of identified mental health and/or substance abuse issues in Redeploy program youth and the extent to which programs are able to provide some level of service to address those identified needs.

  • 80% of youth were identified with Mental Health needs. (111 of 139)
  • 91% of youth with identified Mental Health needs received services to address those needs. (101 of 111)
  • 53% of youth were identified with Substance Abuse needs. (73 of 139)
  • 93% of youth with identified Substance Abuse needs received services to address those needs. (68 of 73)

The Illinois General Assembly passed and the governor signed into law Public Act #98-0060 on July 8, 2013 to address a significant barrier to implementation of the Redeploy program in Cook County. The vast size and population of this county coupled with very distinct police districts and court calendars were proving to be a near insurmountable challenge to coordinating a county-wide Redeploy program. The Redeploy Board believes that this change will enable Cook County to design a smaller scale program that would be comparable to programs that are funded in different jurisdictions around the state.

The Redeploy program has continued to expand and has since added additional sites and counties. As of January 1, 2014 there are 12 sites serving 36 counties with an additional 8 counties projected to begin planning in the first few months of 2014.

Recommendations

The Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board, over the past two years has worked to address the recommendations from the 2011 Redeploy Annual Report, the results of which can be found throughout this report. Please find those specific recommendations in brief below along with a status update. The RIOB and staff continue to address those ongoing recommendations as they have and will continue to significantly enhance the effectiveness of our initiative.

Status of 2011 Report Recommendations

Recommendation #1: Develop a rigorous and realistic comprehensive plan to implement the program statewide that includes a feasibility study, data analysis, programmatic and economic incentive models, policy recommendations, an expansion plan and an outreach plan.

  • DHS and the RIOB have contracted with the University of Illinois, Center for Public Safety and Justice, to develop well researched, empirically supported policy recommendations for the statewide expansion of Redeploy Illinois. The research examines barriers to the expansion efforts, develops statewide programmatic and funding models as well as draft recommendations for a strategy for statewide promotion and adoption. This final report was completed and the Redeploy Board is scheduled to review and vote on its acceptance in January 2014.

Recommendation #2: Create legal authority for the IDHS to enter into agreements with counties exceeding 2,000,000 that will allow for the agreement to encompass a clearly identifiable geographical subdivision of that county while ensuring all other aspects of the legislation are in force same as other counties.

  • The Illinois General Assembly passed and the governor signed into law Public Act #98-0060 on July 8, 2013 to address a significant barrier to implementation of the Redeploy program in Cook County. The vast size and population of this county coupled with very distinct police districts and court calendars were proving to be a near insurmountable challenge to coordinating a county-wide Redeploy program. The Redeploy Board believes that this change will enable Cook County to design a smaller scale program that would be comparable to programs that are funded in different jurisdictions around the state.

Recommendation #3: Work with providers to develop a Redeploy Illinois logic model and set of performance measures for the program in a manner consistent with the Budgeting for Results initiative.

  • Several meetings between Redeploy staff and service providers took place to develop a logic model and set of performance measures. The logic model and performance measures were incorporated into the FY2014 Redeploy contracts and measures were reported under Budgeting for Results.

Recommendation #4: Support improved and increased use of best practice models by providers.

  • The Redeploy Oversight Board recognizes the need to use Evidence Based Interventions and therefore expects every Redeploy Illinois site to utilize at least one Evidence Based Intervention in its programming. Further, over the past two years, the RIOB has supported efforts to expand and improve the use of the Washington Aggression Interruption Training (WAIT) curriculum among Redeploy providers. WAIT is recognized as a best practice approach for teaching young people skills to cope with aggression and has been successfully utilized by many Redeploy providers. The RIOB partnered with the curriculum developers to provide in-depth and ongoing support to ensure the successful implementation of the model. Peoria, Lee, Madison, St. Clair, Macon, and Montgomery counties received coaching and quality assurance support from the national consultant. Through these efforts, two new programs will initiate WAIT programs in 2014.
  • A number of youth come to the Redeploy program experiencing trauma. The RIOB has encouraged and a number of Redeploy sites - including the 2nd Judicial Circuit, Macon, Peoria, and Kankakee counties - have participated in a SPARCS Learning Collaborative. SPARCS stands for Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress. It is a best practice therapeutic approach to help youth coping with trauma. Clinicians from the participating Redeploy sites have completed four days of training and monthly teleconference coaching. They have also implemented SPARCS as a component of their Redeploy program.

Recommendation #5: As funding allows, the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board should continue to fund planning grants to eligible counties in an effort to further expand the reach of the program.

  • Since the last report, the Redeploy program has funded two separate sets of planning grants; the first in July 2011 and the second in September 2012. These Planning Grants have enabled the program to grow to 36 counties. Only three counties that are planning grant eligible have not participated in a planning grant session.

Recommendation #6: The Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board should continue to annually convene staff from all of the Redeploy Illinois sites statewide for the purposes of sharing information, insights and trending.

  • Staff has continued to convene annual All-Sites meetings. In addition to the above, trainings on provider identified topics are also made available in conjunction with these meetings at no cost to the provider.

Recommendation #7: The Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board should develop a series of face-to-face training sessions, webinars, and companion guides explaining the legislation, philosophy, planning, program practices and experiences, and research and evaluation findings for the Redeploy program.

  • Staff have consistently provided onsite technical assistance to provider sites at their request. This includes meeting with and providing technical assistance to new program staff as well as the various professional stakeholders such as probation, community-based organizations, prosecutors, public defenders, and the judiciary where appropriate. The Illinois Collaboration on Youth (ICOY), the Redeploy technical assistance provider, has engaged in discussions and surveys with the Redeploy service providers regarding the areas in need of training, technical assistance, etc. and those requested opportunities have been provided at no cost to program sites. To date this has not arisen from program sites as a specific need. However, the RIOB is in agreement that the items in this recommendation will likely be necessary as the Board begins developing a plan to move the initiative statewide. It expected that the UIS-CPSJ report discussed in recommendation #1 above, will include specific recommendations in this subject area as it relates to publicizing and promoting the initiative throughout the state. Therefore, the Board will be deferring this recommendation until such time as the Board has had sufficient opportunity to review the new report and recommendations.

Recommendation #8: The Redeploy Illinois appropriation should be increased to provide for full statewide expansion of the initiative.

  • While not enough for full statewide expansion, in FY2014 Governor Quinn and the General Assembly has effectively doubled the Redeploy Illinois budget. This has and continues to allow the program to expand. Since the funding has been announced, the RIOB and DHS have been able to continue funding the formerly ARRA funded county as well as add another 8 counties that began in October 2013; an additional 2 counties were added in December 2013; and the Board anticipates that an additional 6 counties will join before the end of the fiscal year.

2014 RIOB Recommendations

As the body of this report indicates, the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board (RIOB) has reviewed research that demonstrates that the program has been effective in reducing youth incarceration and also in creating better outcomes for youth. Communities which have designed services for their youth have created stronger families and safer neighborhoods. For this reason, the Board believes Redeploy should be available to youth throughout the state and wishes to encourage all counties to participate in either the full Redeploy program or Redeploy Focus for counties with smaller youth caseloads. The Board believes that resources should be available to support counties who wish to explore participation in the Redeploy program as well as those who are already participating. Based on this perspective and the statutory requirement that courts statewide place youth in the least restrictive alternative setting, the following recommendations are advanced for the upcoming year:

  1. DHS and the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board should increase its staff capacity to maintain the high quality of its work as the program continues to expand.
  2. The new web-based reporting system (eCornerstone) should be completed, tested and begin full implementation by 1/1/2015. The program sites should receive initial and ongoing training and technical assistance to ensure consistency and timeliness of program data. There should be 24 hour system support for users. There should be system capacity developed to provide program managers access to data and reports necessary to: manage clients; manage caseworkers; track caseloads; monitor individual and program outcomes; monitor program performance; track assessments; track case plans and services; and generally manage their programs. These data should be utilized by DHS staff to: monitor programs and to identify technical assistance needs; inform site visits; regularly report to the RIOB; utilize in future annual reports; be reported under Budgeting for Results; make effective program decisions; and to inform policy and practice. The system should collect and track data in a manner that will provide the capacity to 1) assess positive outcomes for youth; 2) track recidivism in multiple ways; and 3) inform future program evaluations.
  3. The RIOB should evaluate the effectiveness, capacity and overall system performance of the reporting system (eCornerstone). This should be done by developing a survey for providers that will be implemented six and twelve months into full implementation. The survey should be developed by a committee of the RIOB and the results should be presented by staff to the full RIOB with recommendations as appropriate.
  4. Redeploy program sites should develop policies and practices to conduct regular evaluations of the effectiveness of its program services. With a focus on tracking positive outcomes for youth, Redeploy staff should work in partnership with program sites to assist in the development of these policies / practices to ensure a minimum standard is achieved across program sites. Further, the program should ensure that the data system has the capacity to track the necessary data elements to facilitate this process for program sites.
  5. The RIOB should advise every county that Redeploy funds are available statewide for all youth who are redeploy-eligible and at risk of commitment to IDJJ so that, consistent with Redeploy statute, each youth may receive a full and comprehensive individualized assessment, evaluation and case plan.
  6. The RIOB should support adequate funding for needed programming in Illinois and should make available to local communities, sufficient Redeploy funds to implement evidence-based assessments and individualized case plans for jurisdictions currently implementing a local plan as well as those that wish to implement individualized agreements as defined in statute.
  7. The RIOB should make funding available to counties, circuits and/or groups of counties to conduct needs assessments and data analysis of their current system capacity to identify and respond to the needs of juvenile offenders in the community at risk of commitment to IDJJ who are Redeploy eligible.
  8. The RIOB should compile the results of the assessments described in #7, in an effort to document the capacity of communities to comply with the statutory requirement to serve youth in the least restrictive setting. These results will document the demand and unmet need for resources.

Appendies

Appendix 1

Youth population in Redeploy Illinois sites, general population for youth ages 13 to 16, CY2010

African American Caucasian American Indian
Alaskan Native
Asian
Pacific Islander
All races
Hispanic Non-Hispanic Hispanic Non-Hispanic Hispanic Non-Hispanic Hispanic Non-Hispanic Hispanic Non-Hispanic
# % # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Lee 7 3% 61 0% 116 5% 1,649 3% 8 7% 4 2% 0 0% 14 1% 131 4% 1,728 2%
McLean 30 12% 1,077 8% 483 19% 6,627 11% 13 12% 17 8% 9 16% 262 24% 535 18% 7,983 10%
Macon 21 9% 1,471 10% 109 4% 4,111 7% 2 2% 9 4% 2 4% 48 4% 134 5% 5,639 7%
Marion 5 2% 161 1% 27 1% 1932 3% 1 1% 5 2% 1 2% 25 2% 34 1% 2,123 3%
Peoria 74 30% 2,957 21% 412 16% 6,413 11% 25 23% 25 12% 9 16% 264 24% 520 18% 9,659 13%
St. Clair 62 26% 6,433 45% 525 21% 8,620 14% 22 20% 58 28% 19 35% 230 21% 628 21% 15,341 20%
2nd Circuit 14 6% 319 2% 184 7% 9,336 15% 23 21% 21 10% 2 4% 37 3% 223 8% 9,713 13%
4th Circuit 30 12% 1,851 13% 698 27% 22,157 36% 16 15% 67 33% 13 24% 221 20% 757 26% 24,296 32%
Total 243 14,330 2,554 60,845 110 100 206 55 1,101 2,962 76,482

Appendix 2

New Admissions - 2005 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2001 CY 2002 CY 2003 CY 2004 CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Macon 338 228 195 169 175 192 167 200 221 179 187 138 140
Peoria 726 804 821 876 849 806 769 739 664 607 536 539 455
St. Clair 890 815 747 702 623 787 604 573 431 571 436 574 579
Second Circuit 260 252 212 299 335 332 312 304 293 344 328 253 278
Average Daily Population - 2005 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2001 CY 2002 CY 2003 CY 2004 CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Macon 13.9 8.4 7.1 5.1 4.5 6.6 7.1 9.9 7.4 7.8 6.8 4.7 6.1
Peoria 36.2 40.3 34.4 33.5 38.9 39 43.4 42.6 41.3 38.3 30.4 31.9 32.9
St. Clair 27.5 23.5 26.9 30.3 30.9 22 17.7 17.3 15.5 16.5 12.4 14.8 15.2
Second Circuit 7.1 7.5 4.9 6.7 9.2 11.2 12 12.8 12.5 13.7 8.4 6.3 7.2
Average Length of Stay (days) - 2005 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2001 CY 2002 CY 2003 CY 2004 CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Macon 14 12 12 10 8 10 14 17 10 14 15 13 12
Peoria 18 17 14 13 15 17 19 20 22 22 20 20 26
St. Clair 10 10 11 14 17 10 10 10 12 10 9 8 6
Second Circuit 11 9 8 8 9 11 12 14 15 13 10 11 10
New Admissions - 2009 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Lee 22 8 10 12 11 11 9 9 6
Madison 393 395 402 342 333 356 422 389 343
McLean 186 219 205 214 194 189 156 180 145
Fourth Circuit 182 191 179 126 109 134 157 214 184
Average Daily Population - 2009 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Lee 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.3 0.1
Madison 27 24.3 21.5 21.4 16.4 21.2 22.5 17.4 18.7
McLean 9.4 10.8 10.7 11.3 9.5 7.6 5.2 5.2 4.3
Fourth Circuit 7 7.5 8.5 5.6 5.5 5.6 6.9 4.3 4.6
Average Length of Stay (days) - 2009 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Lee 5 6 2 7 10 5 4 11 6
Madison 22 23 18 21 19 19 18 16 16
McLean 16 18 15 20 16 15 11 8 12
Fourth Circuit 13 13 16 16 16 13 18 9 10
Average Daily Population - 2012 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
LaSalle 10.8 11 9.2 10.7 15.8 13.3
Average Length of Stay (days) - 2012 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
LaSalle 26 25 33 25 27 27
New Admissions - 2012 Sites
Redeploy Site CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
LaSalle 140 157 100 152 203 176
New Admissions - Statewide
Redeploy Site CY 2001 CY 2002 CY 2003 CY 2004 CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Statewide 11,029 10,899 10,154 9,795 9,808 13,589 15,745 15,243 13,842 13,641 12,803 12020 11785
Average Daily Population - Statewide
Redeploy Site CY 2001 CY 2002 CY 2003 CY 2004 CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Statewide 525.4 524.8 513.6 516 557.5 800.5 897.6 894.7 822.3 772.2 694.7 653.3 663.4
Average Length of Stay (days) - Statewide
Redeploy Site CY 2001 CY 2002 CY 2003 CY 2004 CY 2005 CY 2006 CY 2007 CY 2008 CY 2009 CY 2010 CY 2011 CY 2012 CY 2013
Statewide 16 16 17 18 19 19 20 20 21 20 20 19 19