Illinois Department of Human Services
Division of Family and Community Services
Bureau of Youth Intervention Services

Services for Homeless Youth Request for Applications

Released March 1, 2014

  1. PART I
    1. Date of Issuance: March 1, 2014
    2. Issuing Organizational Unit
    3. RFA Availability
    4. Date, Location and Time of RFA Opening
    5. Audit Submission Requirements
    6. Application Container and Format Requirements
    7. Eligible Applicants
    8. Questions and Answers
    9. Award Process
    10. Review Panel
    11. Estimated Length of Agreement
    12. Withdrawal Disclaimer
    13. Modifications to Applications by Applicants
    14. Modifications to Applications by DHS
    15. Clarifications, Negotiations or Discussions Initiated by DHS
    16. DHS Grants Information Conference
    17. Late Applications/Responses
    18. Objection
    19. Commencement of Service
    20. Public Information
    21. Contract
    22. Program Evaluation and Reporting Requirements
    23. Training and Technical Assistance
    24. Deliverables
    25. Congressional and Legislative Districts
    26. Additional Information
    27. Sectarian Issue
    28. Background Checks
    29. Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting Mandate
    30. Hiring and Employment Policy
    31. Payment Method
  2. PART II
    1. Department's Need for Services
    2. Goals to be Achieved
    3. Services to be Performed
    4. Application Content
    5. Application Scoring
  3. APPLICATION CONTENT CHECKLIST
  4. APPENDICES

PART I

  1. Date of Issuance: March 1, 2014

  2. Issuing Organizational Unit

    • Illinois Department of Human Services
      Division of Family and Community Services
      Bureau of Youth Intervention Services

    • Contact Person:
      Karrie Rueter, Acting Bureau Chief
      Illinois Department of Human Services
      823 East Monroe Street
      Springfield, Illinois 62701
      DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov
      Phone: (217)557-2943
  3. RFA Availability

    • Copies of this Request for Applications (RFA) may be downloaded from the Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS or the Department) web site: http://www.dhs.state.il.us. Please click on "For Providers" and then on "RFAs." Additional copies may be obtained by contacting the contact person listed above.
  4. Date, Location and Time of RFA Opening

    • Applications must be received no later than 2:00pm on April 15, 2014. The application container will be time-stamped and opened upon receipt. The Department will not accept applications submitted by email, on disk, or by fax.
    • Mail completed applications to:
      • Illinois Department of Human Services Procurement Office
        "Sealed Bid - DO NOT OPEN"
        Homeless Youth
        Centrum North, 401 North 4th Street, 2nd floor
        Springfield, IL 62702
      • Due Date & Time:  April 15, 2014 at 2:00 pm.
    • Applications may be personally dropped off at the above listed site by the due date and time.
    • Important notices:
      1. To be considered, applications must be in the possession of the Illinois Department of Human Services staff at the specified location and by the designated date and time listed above. The deadline and location will be strictly enforced without exception. In the event of a dispute, the applicant bears the burden of proof that the application was received on time at the location listed above.
      2. Applications that are faxed, sent electronically, handwritten, late or delivered to a different location will NOT be accepted and will be immediately disqualified.
  5. Audit Submission Requirements

    • All organizations applying for state funds must submit one (1) copy of their most recent audited financial statements as part of their Applications. The Department will use the audit to ascertain the fiscal health of Applicants.
  6. Application Container and Format Requirements

    • All applications must be typed on 8 x 11-inch paper using 12-point type and 100% magnification. With the exception of letterhead and stationery for letter(s) of support, the entire applications should be typed in black ink on white paper. The program narrative must be typed single spaced, on one side of the page, with 1-inch margins on all sides.
    • The applications must not exceed 20 pages, including the Executive Summary, Agency Qualifications, Methodology, and Work Plan. The Attachments: cover page, checklist, spending plan and narrative, linkage agreements, subcontractor information and any included letters of support are NOT included in the page limitations.
    • The entire application, including attachments, must be sequentially page numbered. Applications should be bound with a single binder clip (not paper clip) in the upper left-hand corner. Applicants must not use any other form of binding, including ring binders, spiral binders, report covers or rubber bands, as well as subject dividers or tabs that extend beyond 82 x 11-inch page.
    • Applicants must submit one clearly identified originally signed application and six (6) completed copies of the application. Additionally, applicants must include one (1) completed electronic copy of the application (disk, USB drives, etc.) Faxed copies will not be accepted.
    • Not adhering to these guidelines for Application submission constitutes grounds for Applications disqualification. Therefore, the Department is under no obligation to review applications that do not comply with the above requirements.
  7. Eligible Applicants

    • Public or private, not-for-profit community-based agencies are eligible to apply for funds under this Request for Application. The funding opportunity is not limited to those who currently receive funding from the Illinois Department of Human Services. Successful applicants must hold all necessary licensees for the program model proposed.
    • Each applicant must have access to the Internet. The Department's website will contain information regarding the RFA. It is the responsibility of each applicant to monitor that website and comply with any instructions or requirements relating to the RFA.
    • Agencies awarded funds through this grant must have or obtain a computer that meets the following minimum specifications for the purpose of utilizing the DHS eCornerstone system and the receipt of electronic program and fiscal information:
      • Internet access, preferably high-speed
      • Email capability
      • Microsoft Excel
      • Microsoft Word
  8. Questions and Answers

    • Each applicant must have access to the Internet. The Department's website will contain information regarding the RFA. It is the responsibility of each applicant to monitor that website and comply with any instructions or requirements relating to the RFA.
    • Submit questions relating to the RFA via email to DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov.  Indicate "HY RFA-Question in the subject line of the email. Asked Questions, with answers, will be posted on the DHS website, located at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=39157. The site will be updated periodically, a minimum of 2 times per week. Only written answers to written questions will be considered valid.
    • The last day to submit a question is April 7, 2014.
  9. Award Process

    • The Department anticipates the availability of approximately $4.5 million for services in FY14 (July 1, 2014 - June 30, 2015)
    • It is anticipated that applicants will receive notifications by the Department regarding funding decisions in May 2014. Successful applicants will be notified in writing by letter from the Secretary of the Illinois Department of Human Services. A Notice of Grant Award is not equivalent to an agreement with the Department to commence providing service. In June 2014 successful applicants should receive the Community Service Agreement for their signature and return it per instructions provided at the time. The release of the RFA does not obligate the Illinois Department of Human Services to make an award. Work cannot begin until a contract in fully executed by the Department.
  10. Review Panel

    • Applications will be reviewed by a panel established by staff from DHS, which may include Department staff familiar with the requirements of the program, academics and experts in relevant field, and community based social services providers who are not party to applications for funding under this announcement. Panel members will initially read and evaluation applications independently using guidelines furnished by DHS and will subsequently participate in review panel meetings during which Applications will be reviewed and scored collectively.
    • The Department reserves the right to consider factors other than the Applicant's final score in determining final grant recommendations. Such factors may include (but are not limited to) geographic service area, Applicant's past performance, or degree of need for service.
  11. Estimated Length of Agreement

    • The Department estimates that the term of the agreement resulting from this RFA will be 12 months, beginning July 1, 2014, and continuing through June 30, 2015. With the mutual consent of both parties, and dependent upon the providers performance and adherence to program requirements, and dependent upon the availability of funds to the Department, the agreement may be renewed for 4 additional one-year periods.
  12. Withdrawal Disclaimer

    • The Department of Human Services may withdraw this Request for Applications at any time prior to the actual time a fully executed agreement is filed with the State of Illinois Comptroller's Office.
  13. Modifications to Applications by Applicants

    • To make modification to an Application after it has been submitted, the applicant must submit a complete replacement Application package, as described above under "application Submission Requirements," accompanied by a letter requesting that the replacement Application be considered. This must be received at the prescribed location by date and time designated under Item D.
  14. Modifications to Applications by DHS

    • If it becomes necessary or appropriate for DHS to change any part of the RFA, a modification to the RFA will be available from the Department's website, found at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=39157. See Section C. The Department will notify all interested parties and known recipients of the RFA. Upon receipt of the modification notice, prospective respondents are asked to send written acknowledgment to the Department contact person, listed above under Issuing Organizational Unit Contract Person. If it becomes necessary or appropriate for DHS to change any part of RFA, a modification to the RFA will be available from the Department's (DHS) website: http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=39157 and will be issued to all known recipients of the RFA. In case of such as unforeseen event, DHS will issue detailed instructions for how to proceed.
  15. Clarifications, Negotiations or Discussions Initiated by DHS

    • The Department may contact any applicant prior to the final award for the following purposes:
      • As part of the Department's review process, the Department may request an applicant clarify its bid or Application. An applicant may not be allowed to materially change its bid or application in response to a request for clarification.
      • Discussions may be held to promote understanding of the Department's requirements and the applicant's Application and to facilitate arriving at a contract that will be most advantageous to the State considering price and other evaluation factors set forth in the RFA.
      • When the Department knows or has reason to conclude that a mistake has been made, the Department shall ask the Applicant to confirm the information. Situations in which confirmation should be requested include obvious or apparent errors on the face of the document or a price unreasonably lower than the price others submitted, or if the price is considerably high than what is currently paid for this type of services. If the Applicant alleges a mistake, the bid or Application may be corrected or withdrawn following the conditions set forth by the State of Illinois.
  16. DHS Grants Information Conference

    • The Department will conduct Grants Information Conferences (formally Bidders Conferences.) Attendance is not mandatory although it is strongly encouraged. A list of dates and places are presented below. Information on actual locations and times will be posted on the DHS web site:  http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=70092. Dates and locations are subject to change.
      • March 10, 2014 - Bloomington
      • March 11, 2014 - Mt. Vernon
      • March 13, 2014 - Chicago
      • March 17, 2014 - Utica
    • Please submit questions relating to this RFA via email to dhs.youthservicesinfo@illinois.gov.Indicate "HY RFA - Question" in the subject line of the email. Asked Questions, with answers, will be posted on the DHS website, located at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=39157. The site will be updated periodically, a minimum of 2 times per week as appropriate.
    • The last day to submit a question is April 7, 2014.
  17. Late Applications/Responses

    • Late Applications will not be opened or considered and will be automatically disqualified, but retained by the Department. The Department will notify all applicants whose Applications will not be considered because of lateness or noncompliance with Application submission requirements.
  18. Objection

    • Applicants who object to any provision of the RFA, who believe their Application was improperly rejected, or who believe that the selected Application(s) is/are not in the best interest of the Department may submit a written protest of the Department's action. The Department will consider all such written protests that are submitted according to the time periods specified below. The Department will investigate all allegations and issue a written response.
    • The decision of the Department is final. Protests must be in writing and will be considered filed when physically received by the Department at the following address:
      • Department of Human Services General Counsel's Office
        Ms. Kathy Ward, Senior Deputy General Counsel
        100 W. Randolph, Suite 6-400
        Chicago, Illinois 60601
    • Protests must be filed within fourteen (14) calendar days after the Protestor known or should have known of the facts giving rise to the protest.
    • Protests regarding RFA specifications must be filed within fourteen (14) calendar days after the date the RFA was issues and, in any event must be filed before the date for opening the Applications. If a protest is received, any award made is not final until the protest is resolved.
  19. Commencement of Service

    • The Department will not reimburse applicants for expenses incurred prior to the complete and final execution of the written contract. If the applicant receives an award letter from the Secretary, then it is reasonable to assume that the Department will be forwarding the Applicant a contract.
    • No services can be reimbursed prior to the full and complete execution of the contract and filing with the Illinois Office of the Comptroller.
  20. Public Information

    • Some information submitted pursuant to the RFA is subject to the Illinois Freedom of Information Act. The successful applicant must recognize and accept that any material marked proprietary or confidential that must be made a part of the contract may be considered open for public inspection. Price information submitted by the successful Applicants shall be considered public.
    • For Applicants scores will NOT be made public. The Department may give Applicants feedback about their Application upon request and at the discretion of the Department.
  21. Contract

    • The legal agreement between DHS and the successful applicants will be in the form and format prescribed by DHS. The standard DHS Community Service Agreement (CSA) will be used as a grant agreement. Samples of this agreement may be found at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=65380 and in Attachment E of this RFA. If selected for funding, the applicant will be provided a DHS Community Service Agreement for their signature and return. Applicants must review the sample CSA and insure that they meet all requirements contained in the CSA. Applicants must note any exceptions contained in the CSA. All exceptions must be agreed to by DHS before awarding any grants and execution of the CSA.
  22. Program Evaluation and Reporting Requirements

    • Successful applicants will be required to participate in evaluation efforts as directed by the Department and/or its subcontractor(s) and collect and report data accordingly. All Providers are required to utilize the Department's e-Cornerstone web-based reporting system. Providers will be required to participate in a Department directed Performance and Standards Assessment review. An annual program plan will be required once per year that includes data, program and outcomes information. Additional data and information may be requested throughout the year as determined by the Department.
  23. Training and Technical Assistance

    • Programs must agree to receive consultation technical assistance from authorized representatives of the Department. The program and collaborating partners will be required to be in attendance at site visits. Programs will be required to attend regular meetings and training as provided by the Department or a subcontractor of the Department, and should budget accordingly.
  24. Deliverables

    • Successful applicants will be required to provide the following information to the Department as grantees:
      • Data via eCornerstone system with additional paper reports as requested by the Department.
      • Monthly Expenditure Documentation Forms (EDFs), in a format provided by the Department.
      • Annual program plan and detailed program budget in format provided by the Department.
      • Annual agency budget in a format provided by the Department.
  25. Congressional and Legislative Districts

    • The applicant must provide on the required Application and Plan for Human Services Program (cover sheet) the Congressional District (by number), available at the following website: http://www.firstgov.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml; and the Illinois House and Senate Legislative Districts (by number), available on the Illinois General Assembly website at http://www.ilga.gov.
  26. Additional Information

    • The Department reserves the right to request additional information that could assist with its award decision. Applicants are expected to provide the additional information within a reasonable period of time. Failure to provide the information could result in the rejection of the application.
  27. Sectarian Issue

    • Applicant organizations may not expend federal or state funds for sectarian instruction, worship, prayer or to proselytize. If the applicant organization is a faith-based or a religious organization that offers such activities, these activities shall be voluntary for the individuals receiving services and offered separately from the program.
  28. Background Checks

    • Background checks are required for all program staff and volunteers who have the potential for one-on-one contact with children and youth. Funded programs will be required to have a written protocol on file requiring background checks, as well as evidence of their completion.
  29. Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting Mandate

    • Per the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act (ANCRA, 325 ILCS 5/4), mandated reporters are professionals who may work with children in the course of their professional duties. Mandated reporters are required to report suspected child maltreatment immediately when they have "reasonable cause to believe" that a child known to them in their professional or official capacity may be an abused or neglected child" (ANCRA Sec.4). This is done by calling the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) Hotline at 1-800-252-2873 or 1-800-25ABUSE. Programs funded through this grant opportunity must review ANCRA and, where appropriate, have a written protocol for identifying and reporting suspected child maltreatment.
  30. Hiring and Employment Policy

    • It is the policy of the Department to encourage cultural diversity in the work environment and to promote employment opportunities through its programs. The Department philosophy is that the program workforce should appropriately reflect the populations to be served, with special attention given to hiring individuals indigenous to those communities. Consistent with Department policy, whenever a position becomes available, funded programs are encouraged to consider TANF clients for employment, contingent upon their qualifications in the areas of education and work experience.
  31. Payment Method

    • Payments to successful programs shall be made on a prospective basis. Expenditures must be consistent with the agency's approved spending plan on file with the Department. Actual expenditures incurred for the purchase of allowable goods and services necessary for conducting program activities shall be documented, utilizing the Department's Summary Expenditure Documentation and Certification Form for reconciliation against the approved budget and total award amount. Unexpended funds will be returned to the Department, per the Grant Funds Recovery process.

PART II

INTRODUCTION

  1. Department's Need for Services

    • A record 51,638 Illinois students were identified as homeless in the 2012 - 2013 school year, ten years ago, that number was less than 12,000.
    • Contributing factors to youth homelessness include poverty, lack of affordable housing, low education levels, unemployment, mental health, and substance abuse. Beyond these factors, youth homelessness is largely a reflection of family breakdown. Youth become homeless for varying reasons, including running away from home, being abandoned by their parents or guardians, being emancipated, or discharged from some sort of state care. Homeless youth often flee homes where they experience physical abuse. Violence and traumatic life events play a major role in the lives of homeless children. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, by the age of 12, 83 percent of homeless children have been exposed to at least one serious violent event and 25 percent of homeless children have witnessed acts of violence within their families. Many youth experience abandonment and severe family conflict stemming from their sexual orientation and gender identity. Some youth become homeless because they are pregnant or parenting.
    • A growing body of national research bolsters the conclusion that Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) youth represent approximately 20 percent of homeless youth. This is disproportionate to the number of LGBTQ youth (10 percent) in the general population. Conservatively estimated, each year 110,000 LGBTQ youth experience homelessness in America.
    • Roughly two-thirds of homeless youth seeking shelter are female. Half of these young women report having had a pregnancy experience compared to less than 10 percent living in a household. Results of these pregnancies, seemingly divided by thirds, are miscarriages, abortions and live delivery.
    • Homeless youth are socially marginalized and often arrested for "status" offenses, such as running away or breaking curfew. For youth who are released from juvenile corrections facilities, reentry is often difficult because they lack support systems and opportunities for work and housing.
    • Homelessness has serious consequences for young people and is especially dangerous for those between the ages of 16 and 24 who do not have familial support. Living in shelters or on the streets, unaccompanied homeless youth are at a higher risk for physical and sexual assault or abuse and physical illness, including HIV/AIDS. Furthermore, homeless youth are at a higher risk for anxiety disorders, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicide because of increased exposure to violence while living on their own. Children experiencing homelessness have heightened health problems. According to the National Center for Family Homelessness, children are four times more often sick than their non-homeless counterparts, go hungry twice the rate and have high rates of nutritional deficiencies. Overall, homeless youth are likely to become involved in prostitution, to use and abuse drugs, and to engage in other dangerous and illegal behaviors.
    • Life as a homeless youth is beset with significant hardships and undermined by severe social and emotional experiences. Homeless Youth Services represents Illinois' intervention to protect, shelter, feed, counsel and educate unaccompanied teenagers and young adults in an attempt to foster healthy and productive lives.
  2. Goals to be Achieved

    • Funded projects will be required to provide services to individual homeless youth designed to increase their safety, well-being, and self-sufficiency.
    • All funded projects will effectively demonstrate the capacity to implement a holistic model that includes an outreach component, an emergency shelter/interim housing component and a transitional living component. Although not required, this continuum of care would allow a youth to enter the program at any stage and afford them the opportunity to transition from one component to the next if appropriate.
    • All programs will have the capacity to address the immediately identifiable needs of homeless youth through an emergency safety assessment/care plan that will identify and address immediate needs such as safety, food, clothing, shelter, medical, etc. through direct interventions and appropriate referrals. Programs will have one or more facilities located in areas frequented by and/or easily accessible by homeless youth. All programs will have the capacity to provide homeless youth access to age-appropriate emergency/interim shelter (A minimum of 4 beds will be required.) available on a 24 hour basis for up to 120 days. All projects will have a Transitional Living Program component that will provide stable, safe living accommodations for youth for a maximum of 24 months. (A minimum capacity of 4 will be required.) These accommodations may be host family homes, group homes, or supervised apartments. Supervised apartments are either agency-owned apartment buildings or "scattered-site" apartments, which are single-occupancy apartments rented directly by youth with support from the agency.
    • Each successful applicant will provide an array of services to these youth that will include: emergency safety assessments/care plans; comprehensive individualized assessments; individualized case management; housing; needed goods (clothing, shoes, food and personal hygiene products, etc.); benefits services (e.g., SSI, SSDI, WIC, TANF etc.); educational services; life skills/independent living skills; employment and/or vocational training ; recreational services; social skills training; prevention services; transportation; individual counseling; services for special populations (pregnant; parenting; LGBTQ ; delinquent; developmentally disabled) such as access to child care; parenting classes; prenatal care; nutrition education, etc. and services generally provided through referral including: substance abuse services; legal services; mental health services; physical health services; dental services etc.; discharge planning; and follow-up services.
    • Program models will:
      • Reflect a positive youth development (PYD) approach. Rather than targeting individual negative behaviors, PYD is a holistic approach that supports youth in achieving developmentally appropriate milestones and in having positive interactions with their family, school, neighborhood, society, and culture.
      • Include strategies for helping youth build protective factors that moderate the impact of past and future negative experiences.
      • Meaningfully involve each youth in program decisions that affect them.
      • Reflect a trauma-informed approach, which involves understanding and responding to the symptoms of chronic interpersonal trauma and traumatic stress, as well as the behavioral and mental health consequences of trauma.
      • Include an array of evidence-based and evidence-informed services and interventions that address the behavioral, psychological, and physical health of youth.
    • In an effort to reduce the number of homeless youth in Illinois, programs will ensure youth are safe, strive to meet the basic emergency/survival needs of youth; to ensure youth are employed or are in school; have acquired a High School Diploma or GED; are enrolled in eligible mainstream benefits; and have developed the social and life skills necessary to achieve healthy and productive independence.
    • In addition, services for special needs populations will also be assessed. For example: programs that serve pregnant youth will ensure that these youth receive pre-natal care and that pregnant and parenting youth receive parenting skills/classes.
  3. Services to be Performed

    • Providers will implement a holistic model that includes an outreach component, an emergency shelter/interim housing component and a transitional living component. The primary service delivery approach will be individualized case management.
    • Outreach Requirements
    • Outreach programs are designed to identify homeless youth who are not wards of the State, to ensure that their basic safety, survival and immediate needs are being met, and to provide case management and other services designed to assist homeless youth in making healthy lifestyle choices.
      • Eligibility requirements:
        1. Youth must be at least 14 years of age and may not have reached their 24th birthday.
        2. Youth may not be enrolled after their 24th birthday.
        3. For youth up to the age of 18, including minor unmarried parents, immediately upon intake, the provider must notify the local CCBYS (Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services) agency about any youth who is a minor away from home who has run away or whose parents will not allow him/her into the home; and when necessary notify DCFS and /or the local law enforcement.
    • All youth will immediately receive the following:
      • A safety assessment; an emergency care/safety plan and that plan will be implemented to ensure that the immediately identifiable needs of these youth in crisis are met, including food, clothing, emergency shelter, survival aid, medical treatment, emergency mental health /substance use referral/ treatment, etc.
      • Referring youth under the age of 18 to the local CCBYS provider as indicated above.
      • Contacting the DCFS hotline in required situations.
    • When necessary, youth will have access to age-appropriate emergency shelter.
    • Whenever possible, youth will receive the following:
      • Comprehensive individualized assessment and case planning services.
      • Help to reunify youth with his/her family where appropriate.
      • Help to achieve safe, stable living arrangements.
      • Information on employment, job readiness and support services;
      • Responding to the educational needs of youth. Informing them of their rights and working with the appropriate McKinney-Vento liaison to ensure their rights are honored. (Federal law that ensures youth experiencing homelessness have full and equal access to an appropriate public education and that they experience success in school.)
      • Offering education, prevention, and access to intervention services on issues related to domestic violence, sexual abuse, or exploitation.
    • Outreach Program Activities at a minimum will include:
      • Contacting homeless youth where they congregate, through site based outreach and/or a drop in shelter;
      • Conducting outreach events - Services are provided in areas where homeless youth are known to congregate or where they are located; or
      • Other outreach activities - These are activities within the community designed to make them aware of services available at the agency. This may include in-person outreach, flyers, speaking to community groups, hotlines and/or other means of establishing the agency as a resource for homeless youth.
    • Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing (ES)
    • Emergency/Interim Housing programs provide temporary housing and services to homeless youth who are not wards of the State, on a 24-hour basis for up to 120 days. These programs are designed to ensure that basic safety, survival and immediate needs are being met, to reunify the youth with his/her family, when possible or to transition them from homelessness to self-sufficient living. Programs will also provide case management and other services designed to assist homeless youth in making healthy lifestyle choices.
      • Eligibility requirements:
        1. Youth must be at least 14 years of age and may not have reached their 24th birthday.
        2. Youth may not be enrolled after their 24th birthday.
        3. Youth enrolled prior to their 24th birthday remain eligible for up to 120 days of service even if it exceeds their 24th birthday. (Youth will not be terminated on their 24th birthday.)
        4. For youth up to the age of 18, including minor unmarried parents:
          1. immediately upon intake, the provider must notify the local CCBYS (Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services) agency about any youth who is a minor away from home who has run away or whose parents will not allow him/her into the home; and/or
          2. Within 48 business hours of intake, parental permission must be obtained in writing or, if verbal, it must be witnessed by two parties. If permission cannot be secured within 48 business hours:
            1. the agency must document its attempts to secure parental permission; and
            2. the agency must follow procedures outlined in the Illinois Juvenile Court Act, found at 705 ILCS 405/3-5.
      • Agency staff must be available 24 hours a day to enroll youth and provide services that at a minimum will include:
        • Conducting a safety assessment; developing an emergency care/safety plan and implementing it to ensure that the immediately identifiable needs of these youth in crisis are met, including food, clothing, emergency shelter, survival aid, medical treatment, emergency mental health /substance use referral/ treatment, etc.
        • Referring youth under the age of 18 to the local CCBYS provider.
        • Contacting the DCFS hotline in required situations.
        • Providing safe, clean, dry place to sleep for a minimum of 4 youth.
    • Transitional Living (TL)
    • Transitional Living programs provide housing and services to homeless youth who are not wards of the State, for up to 24 months. Programs are designed to transition youth from homelessness to self-sufficient living; and/or to reunify the youth with his/her family, when possible.
      • Eligibility requirements:
        1. Youth must be at least 16 years of age and may not have reached their 24th birthday.
        2. Youth may not be enrolled after their 24st birthday.
        3. Services to youth will end with their 24th birthday. Any exception to this rule will be case by case and must be approved in writing by the DHS Program Administrator. Approved extensions must meet criteria established by DHS and will be 3 months in length. In NO case will extensions exceed one year.
        4. For enrollment of youth up to the age of 18, parental permission must be granted or the youth must be partially or fully emancipated.
      • The facilities must have the capacity to accommodate not fewer than 4 youth at any time.
      • The facilities must be in compliance with State and local licensing requirements to operate the proposed housing model.
      • Programs must provide homeless youth with stable, safe living accommodations. Living accommodations may be host family homes, group homes, or supervised apartments. Supervised apartments are either agency-owned apartment buildings or "scattered-site" apartments, which are single-occupancy apartments rented directly by youth people with support from the agency.
      • Programs must provide youth with basic life skills training, including health promotion, life planning and goal setting, household management and budgeting, and interpersonal skill-building. Interpersonal skill-building must include helping youth develop permanent connections with peers, family and other adults.
      • Programs must also provide pregnant and parenting youth with life skills training in adequate supervision, parenting skills, family budgeting, health and nutrition, child care for dependent children, family planning, and pregnancy prevention.
      • Programs must provide youth with educational opportunities, such as GED preparation, post-secondary training, or vocational education. Services for secondary education must be coordinated with the youth's McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 (as amended).
      • Programs must develop and implement a job readiness plan with each youth that includes steps to obtaining and keeping a job, resume writing, interviewing skills, and appropriate professional work attire.
      • Programs must collaborate with each youth to develop individual goals designed to help youth transition from supervised participation in the program to independent living or another safe and appropriate living arrangement.
      • Programs must develop and implement a discharge plan that includes providing follow-up support and/or additional services to each youth at least 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after they leave the program.
      • The organization must have a supervisory structure that provides for adequate on-site supervision for both staff and youth in residential and non-residential services. On-site supervision is not required in host family homes.
      • Programming
      • Each funded program will provide the following in addition to the preceding services.
        1. Intake - Intake should be completed within 24 hours of accepting the client into the program. Often this will be completed in conjunction with the emergency safety assessment. Intake should include, at a minimum, the following information, documents and/or processes:
          1. Enrollment - The provider must collect demographic information, emergency contact information, referral date, source and reason, education and employment status, information regarding special population status (pregnant, parenting, LGBTQ, Disability etc.) and information on other current and/or prior services.
          2. Client's Rights - The provider must inform the youth of his/her rights that are protected by state and federal law. The agency assures that the youth's rights are:
            1.  presented to the youth in writing;
            2. communicated to the youth in a language that he/she understands;
            3. signed by the youth, his/her parent or guardian (when applicable) and caseworker; and
            4. kept on file at the provider agency.
          3. Informed Consent - The provider must confirm that the youth consents to services. This document must:
            1. be presented to the youth in writing;
            2. include the types of services to be provided;
            3. be communicated to the youth in a language that he/she understands;
            4. be signed by the youth, his/her parent or guardian (when applicable) and caseworker; and
            5. be kept on file at the provider agency.
          4. Rules of the Home - For youth participating in ES or TLP programming, the provider must inform the youth of the rules of the home, including the consequences for breaking them. These rules must be:
            1. provided to the youth in writing;
            2. communicated in a language that he/she understands;
            3. signed by the youth; and
            4. kept on file at the provider agency.
        2. Comprehensive Assessment
          1. Within 30 days of accepting a client into the program, the provider must conduct a comprehensive assessment of the client's needs, using an individualized assessment process, as prescribed by the Department.
          2. Within 30 days of determining that a youth is pregnant or parenting, he or she must have an additional assessment, as prescribed by the Department.
          3. Additional assessments should be conducted as necessary. These would include, but are not limited to Substance Abuse; Mental Health; Educational; Trauma etc. These can be completed by referral.
        3. Case Planning - Within 45 days of enrollment into the program, and after completing the comprehensive assessment, the provider agency must develop an individualized case plan with the youth, as follows:
          1. The provider must convene a case planning meeting which must include, at a minimum, the youth and provider staff. The youth's support (e.g., friends, family, guardian, other service providers, and/or clergy) are encouraged to participate, when possible and appropriate.
          2. The case plan must include clearly stated goals and measurable objectives, in language that the youth can understand.
          3. The goals should relate directly to the needs identified by the youth's comprehensive assessment and should be aimed toward positive discharge of the youth from the program.
            • This will also include any needs resulting from additional assessments conducted and may include items from the emergency/safety plan that are yet to be completed.
          4. The case plan must include the frequency and manner of interaction between the youth and his/her case worker, as appropriate to the achievement of his/her goals.
          5. The case plan must be signed by the youth, provider staff, and any other service provider who was present at the meeting, indicating that they agree to and support the plan. Other individuals who attend the meeting are encouraged to sign, when appropriate.
          6. The provider agency must keep the original case plan on file, and provide a copy to the youth.
          7. The case plan must be monitored as described in Section F, Case Monitoring and Tracking, below.
        4. Required Services. All providers must provide or subcontract for the following services, in a manner that is culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate, indicated through the assessment of the client's needs and appropriate to implementation of the case plan. Available services shall include, but not be limited to:
          1. Housing
          2. Food - The provider will insure that the youth has access to sufficient food to meet his/her physical need.
          3. Needed goods - The provider will assure that the youth has access to needed goods, including, but not limited to, clothing, shoes, food and personal hygiene products.
          4. Benefits - The provider will assist youth in obtaining and maintaining available entitlements supports and services (e.g., SSI, SSDI, WIC, TANF, subsidized housing).
          5. Educational services - The provider will assure that the youth has access to an educational program promoting achievement of a GED or high school diploma.
          6. Life skills/independent living skills - Life skills or independent living skills training that promote the youth's self-sufficiency and address the needs of special populations.
          7. Employment and/or vocational training - The provider will assure that the youth has access to an employment/vocational program promoting achievement of career or vocational goals.
          8. Social skills training - The provider will promote the development of interpersonal skills in the youth through positive modeling and/or access to formal training or involvement in group activities.
          9. Prevention services - Any of a variety of support services designed to improve the health and well-being of the youth and to enhance his/her chances of achieving or maintaining self-sufficiency and a healthy lifestyle.
          10. Transportation - May include the purchase of tickets and/or passes for airplanes, buses or trains; taxi or car fare; or provision of transportation for a youth by a driver approved by the provider agency.
          11. Individual counseling - Problem-solving, guidance and consultation with the youth around the case plan and/or his/her immediate concerns
          12. Special population needs - Services to address the needs of youth with special needs, such as those who are pregnant and/or parenting, including fathers; LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, questioning); delinquent; developmentally disabled.
        5. Additional Services - The provider may provide onsite, refer and/or link the youth to community-based resources for the following services, in a manner that is culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate, as indicated through the assessment of needs and appropriate to implementation of the case plan:
          1. Substance abuse services
          2. Legal services
          3. Mental health services
          4. Individual therapy
          5. Physical health services
          6. Dental services
        6. Case Monitoring/Tracking - Providers must monitor and track the youth's progress toward achievement of his/her goals as established in the case plan.
          1. Providers must document the youth's progress toward achievement of his/her stated goals, entering case notes into his/her file that are clearly related to the case plan.
          2. The case plan in its entirety must be reviewed with the youth every 90 days, at a minimum, and updated as necessary. Updating will include the development of new goals and objectives that reflect the youth's progress and current status.
        7. Discharge/Case Closure - When possible, prior to leaving the program, the provider will meet with the youth and others, as appropriate, to discuss the youth's impending discharge.
          1. The provider will document the circumstances of and reason(s) for the youth's discharge from the program.
          2. The provider will meet with the youth to develop a discharge plan which includes, at a minimum, a summary of services received, activities currently in place, and services that will be available to him/her through the provider and other community agencies for a minimum of 30 days. The plan will also include recommendations for follow-up.
          3. The provider will collect data necessary to track program and youth progress and outcomes. At a minimum this will include: Discharge date and reason, education and employment status, information regarding special population status for example if youth was pregnant, did she receive pre-natal care. Information will also be collected on case plan progress and additional items deemed necessary by the Department.
        8. Follow-up Services - Three months after the case is closed, the provider must have documented attempt(s) to contact the youth to assure that the situation continues to be stable. If necessary, the case will be re-opened to provide additional needed services.
      • Administration
      • Each provider is required to adhere to the following:
        1. Agency Licensure - Agencies that provide housing for youth under the age of 18 must be licensed by DCFS. The type of license that is appropriate for any given program (for example, child welfare, aggregate living, etc.) will be determined by DCFS. Please refer to Title 89, Chapter II, Subchapter d, Part 37 Facilities and programs exempt from licensure AND subchapter e, Part 410 Licensing standards for youth emergency shelters.
        2. Staffing
          1. Ratio - The youth-to-staff ratio varies based on the type and intensity of services being provided, as follows:
            1. Group housing - The youth-to-staff ratio in licensed programs that provide housing for youth under the age of 18 will be determined by the DCFS license. In cases where licensing does not apply, the program shall maintain a ratio of staff to youth that is sufficient to ensure adequate supervision and treatment, as determined by the Department.
            2. Scattered site housing - The youth-to-staff ratio for case management of youth in scattered site living must be no more than 25 to 1.
            3. Outreach events/activities - For safety purposes, two staff persons or one staff person and one trained volunteer, at a minimum, must be present at every outreach event/activity.
        3. Qualifications - Staff qualifications will vary based on the services being provided, as follows:
          1. Housing - Staff qualifications in licensed programs that provide housing for youth under the age of 18 will be determined by the DCFS license. In cases where licensing does not apply, staff qualifications are as follows:
            1. Direct service - At least 21 years of age with a minimum of a high school diploma or GED plus experience; bachelors degree is preferred.
              1. Case managers - At least 21 years of age with a minimum of a bachelors degree in a related field plus experience; masters degree plus experience preferred.
              2. Supervisor - At least 25 years of age with a minimum of a bachelors degree plus experience; masters degree plus experience is preferred.
              3. Administrator - At least 25 years of age with a minimum of a masters degree plus experience.
          2. Outreach
            1. Direct service - At least 18 years of age with a minimum of a high school diploma or GED plus experience (prior work experience and/or life experience); bachelors or masters degree plus experience is preferred.
            2. Supervisor/Administrator - At least 25 years of age with a minimum of bachelors degree plus experience; masters degree plus experience is preferred.
            3. Training and Continuing Education - Ongoing training and education is essential for the professional growth of the staff and assurance of high quality care for youth. At a minimum, each staff person must complete 15 hours of training every two years. This training must include:
              1.  First aid/CPR certification
              2. Agency/program policies and procedures
              3. Youth and adolescent development
              4. Child Care Act of 1969 (225 ILCS 10) and mandated reporting
              5. Crisis intervention
        4. Training
          • The organization must have a staff training program that includes ongoing training on the following topics: risk reductions; aftercare; homelessness and poverty; case management/planning; case documentation; safety protocols; ethics and boundaries; harm reduction; crisis intervention; trauma informed care; positive youth development; basic counseling skills; healthy sexual behavior; gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues; cultural awareness and sensitivity; mental health awareness; alcohol, drug and chemical dependency awareness; bullying and harassment; and sexual exploitation and prostitution.
        5. Safety Protocol
          • Grantees must have policies prohibiting harassment based on race, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity (or expression), religion, and notional origin. Grantees must have procedures established to monitor claims, address them seriously, and document their corrective action(s) so all participants are assured that programs are safe, inclusive, and non-stigmatizing by design and in operation.
        6. Supervision
          • Providers must ensure that there is sufficient supervision to provide for the safety and oversight of outreach workers.
        7. Reporting of Unusual Incidents
          • The agency must notify appropriate Department staff in writing of any of the following incidents involving youth enrolled in the program, within 24 business hours of the incident:
            •  Serious threat or violence to self or others
            • Death
            • Suicide/suicide attempt
            • Violence between youth and staff that results in injury
            • Allegation of abuse or neglect reported to the State's Central Registry (DCFS)
        8. A confidential record keeping system, which includes a central standardized file on all clients will be developed, maintained and kept in a locked file cabinet. Files on each client shall include the intake/assessment, legal documents, care plan, agreements for care, and case notes reflective of the ongoing care and services to the youth.
        9. Policy and Procedure Manual - each agency will develop/maintain a written local policy and procedure manual that contains at a minimum, the policies/procedures for the following:
          1. Emergency procedures for:
            1. transportation - bad weather practices, accident procedures, driver requirements
            2. serious illness/medical emergencies
            3. assessing medical care for youth in agency placement
            4. taking necessary precautions to guard against contagious and communicable diseases
          2. Maintenance of personnel files for all staff, including volunteers and interns.
          3. Monitoring of staff who serve as child transporters for possession of a valid Illinois driver's license, good driving record documented by Secretary of State Transcript, current proof of insurance and a current background check on file.
          4. Maintenance of client confidentiality-both on paper and in computer.
          5. Non-traditional (off-site and after hours) usage of the Department's e-Cornerstone system.
          6. Notifying the local CCBYS agency about any youth who is a minor away from home, who has run away, or whose parents will not allow him/her to return home.
          7. All staff who administers the Ansell-Casey assessment must participate in the required DHS sponsored Ansell-Casey training in advance of administering the assessment. This training will be offered multiple times per year. Any exception to this must be pre-approved by the Department.
          8. Methods for assuring that staff are trained and updated on local policies.
          9. Maintenance of a central record for reporting unusual incidents that includes documentation of contact with DHS at a minimum and DCFS (as appropriate to the nature of the incident).
          10. Agency plan for outreach to local social service provider community to educate them about Homeless Youth and facilitate referrals (minimally with schools). Agency maintains documentation that outreach activities occur at least annually.
          11. Handling DCFS wards who are not program eligible.
          12. A policy for determining how and where outreach activities will be offered. Policy should include how data is used to support decisions, as well as information from other community entities or agencies such as law enforcement, faith-based organizations, etc. Agency has a methodology to determine "where youth are known to congregate."
          13. Availability of staff on a 24/7 basis.
          14. A policy addressing the review and updating of the Policy and Procedure Manual including the frequency with which it is done.
        10. The Provider agrees to send a minimum of one staff representative to attend mandated regional and/or statewide meetings sponsored by the Department. The Provider should budget for 2 meetings per year. Efforts will be made to schedule meetings in locations to ensure one-way travel time does not exceed 3 hours.
        11. Client Reporting: The Provider agrees to use the Department's eCornerstone system to fully document the provision of services to each client. This will enrolling all youth served in the program, capturing demographic and risk factor data; capturing education, employment, living and other status information; assessment information, case planning information; service delivery; termination and follow up information.
          1. Clients will be enrolled in eCornerstone within 24 hours of initial contact.
          2. A Casey Assessment must be conducted within 30 days of enrollment.
          3. A case plan will be developed within 45 days of enrollment.
          4. Additional assessments will be recorded in eCornerstone upon completion.
          5. Casey Assessment(s) must be conducted upon discharge from program and recorded in e-Cornerstone.
          6. The client's eCornerstone enrollment must be terminated within 72 hours of exiting the program.
        12. Client Records: A current hard copy record shall be maintained for each youth receiving services. Records for each child shall include, but not be limited to supporting documentation for the following:
          1. Initial assessment
          2. Intake information
          3. Ansell-Casey Assessment including subsequent timely Assessments.
          4. Signed and dated client case plan with any subsequent revisions, updates, etc. and documentation that copy of case plan was provided to youth.
          5. Other legal documents, and agreements for care, as appropriate, and case notes reflective of the ongoing care and treatment of the child.
  4. Application Content

    • To prepare successful applicants for their reporting requirements, the performance measures and standards for the Homeless Youth Program are presented in Appendix 3 for review. This information is for your PLANNING USE ONLY.
      1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Max 10 Points)
        • The Executive Summary will serve as a stand-alone document for successful applicants that will be shared with various state-level stakeholders and others requesting a brief overview of each funded project. Applicants must provide a brief description of the proposed homeless youth program including services to be provided, need for the services, area to be served, capacity to provide the services and the projected numbers to be served in the various program components.
      2. AGENCY QUALIFICATIONS (Max 30 Points)
        • Describe the applicant agency, its history, past experiences and current capacities in homeless youth services. Data and outcomes should be included as evidence of previous program oversight. If this will be a new program, provide data and outcomes from similar programs as evidence. Describe the agency's experience providing other services to at risk.
        • Provide an organizational chart of the agency that identifies the staff providing Outreach, Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing and Transitional Living. The Organizational Chart is to be placed in Attachment A1. Include resumes of the agency director, homeless youth director and fiscal manager in Attachment A2. Job descriptions for the Homeless Youth Program staff are to be presented in Attachment A3.
        • Describe how the applicant will maintain staff competencies regarding youth issues and service delivery methods such as risk reductions; aftercare; homelessness and poverty; case management/planning; case documentation; safety protocols; ethics and boundaries; harm reduction; crisis intervention; trauma informed care; positive youth development; basic counseling skills; healthy sexual behavior; gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues; cultural awareness and sensitivity; mental health awareness; alcohol, drug and chemical dependency awareness; bullying and harassment; and sexual exploitation and prostitution.
        • Provide evidence of agency licensure in Attachment A5 in the event that youth under 18 years of age will be served. Agencies that provide housing for youth under the age of 18 must be licensed by DCFS. The type of license that is appropriate for any given program (for example, child welfare, aggregate living, etc.) will be determined by DCFS. Please refer to Title 89, Chapter II, Subchapter d, Part 37 Facilities and programs exempt from licensure AND subchapter e, Part 410 Licensing standards for youth emergency shelters.
        • Provide staffing ratios to be used by the applicant for each service area: Outreach, Emergency Shelter/Interim and Transitional Living. Describe the physical sites / placements and services for the program and describe how the youth will be separated where necessary. The applicant will have immediate access to physical space in which homeless youth activities will be provided (e.g. existing, new construction). Complete sites and placement forms found in Appendix 4. Include these as Attachment A4.
        • Provide assurances that all applicant employees and volunteers that may or have the potential to come in contact with participants will undergo criminal background and CANTS checks.
        • Describe the Safety Protocol used by the applicant that details policies prohibiting harassment based on race, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity (or expression), religion, and notional origin. Applicants must have procedures established to monitor claims, address them seriously, and document their corrective action(s) so all participants are assured that programs are safe, inclusive, and non-stigmatizing by design and in operation. Further, applicants must ensure sufficient supervision for the safety and oversight of outreach workers. Finally, the applicant must have procedures in place to notify authorities, including the Illinois Department of Human Services of the following incidents involving participants:
          • Serious threat or violence to self or others
          • Death
          • Suicide/suicide attempt
          • Violence between youth OR between youth and staff that results in injury
          • Allegation of abuse or neglect reported to the State's Central Registry (DCFS)
        • Document the applicant's commitment to use the IDHS eCornerstone system to enroll all participants, capture demographic and risk factors; record education, employment, living and other status information; and chronicle service delivery, termination and follow-up information.
      3. PROJECT NARRATIVE (Max 37 Points)
        • In the Project Narrative, the applicant will provide a comprehensive framework and description of all aspects of the proposed project. The applicant must also demonstrate evidence of linguistic and cultural competence throughout the Program Narrative. IDHS' Linguistic and Cultural Competence Guidelines can be found in Appendix 5. The narrative should be succinct, self-explanatory and well organized so that reviewers can understand the application. Please use the headings presented in these instructions to arrange the application:
          1. Introduction (Max 2 Points)
            The Introduction will briefly describe the proposed program. It will present the applicant's plans to provide Outreach, Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing and Transitional Living to the homeless youth in the proposed target area.
          2. Methodology (Max 35 Points)
            The Methodology section will describe how the applicant intends to deliver a continuum of Outreach, Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing and Transitional Living services through Intake, Comprehensive Assessment, Case Planning, Case Monitoring/Tracking, Discharge/Case Closure and Follow-up of homeless youth in the target area. The proposed service delivery approach must demonstrate the applicant understands of the importance of providing:
            • Positive youth development (PYD) approach
            • Trauma-informed care
            • Evidence-based and evidence-informed services and interventions
            • Strategy for working with schools to address the educational needs of identified homeless youth
            • Education, prevention, and access to intervention services for domestic violence, sexual abuse, or exploitation
            • Strategies for helping youth build protective factors
            • Youth voice in decision making
              1. Intake
                Describe how the applicant will complete intake within 24 hours of accepting a participant into the program. The intake process must be standardized. In the description of the intake process, the applicant must address how it will involve Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services providers in its target area. Describe the procedures used during the intake process. Intake includes, at a minimum, a Safety Assessment, an Emergency Care/Safety Plan, Enrollment (demographics, history etc.), Client's Rights, Informed Consent and Rules of the Home. Finally, detail methods for conducting intake for homeless youth regardless of shelter arrangements.
              2. Comprehensive Assessment
                Explain how the applicant will conduct comprehensive assessment and identify the tools to be used in this process. Provide details on risk factors included in the assessment (e.g. medical, psychosocial, substance use, mental health, educational, trauma) and protective factors. Describe how youth will be reassessed to determine progress. Detail methods for conducting comprehensive assessments on homeless youth regardless of shelter arrangements.
              3. Case Planning
                Identify and justify the specific tool that will be used for case planning. Provide details on the process for creating a care plan, identifying appropriate resources and services in the community, facilitating linkages to appropriate services and resources, and monitoring and follow-up. Discuss how the applicant will determine differing levels of participant risk and the type, timing, duration and intensity of services matched to the risk level. Identify the services to be delivered directly by the applicant and indirectly through subcontracts or referrals/linkage agreements. Detail methods to provide case management for homeless youth regardless of shelter arrangements. Briefly describe the intended methods of service delivery. Detail linkages with service providers in the community including police, health care and educational services etc. Include detailed linkage agreements for non-sub-contracted service providers where referrals will be made in Attachment A6.
              4. Case Monitoring/Tracking
                Homeless Youth Providers must monitor and track the youth's progress toward achievement of his/her goals as established in the case plan. Describe the process by which the applicant will continuously monitor progress and modify the care plan based on progress and current status. Describe how the youth will be involved in this process.
              5. Discharge/Case Closure
                Describe the applicant's Discharge/Case Closure process. Discuss method used to develop the discharge plan. Provide a description of the contents of the discharge plan. Identify the full range of resources potentially available to a participant up to 30 days post discharge.
              6. Follow-up Services
                Describe the methods to be used by the applicant to contact participants three and six months post discharge.
      4. WORK PLAN (Max 15 Points)
        Describe the activities or steps that will be used to deliver Outreach, Emergency Shelter/Interim House and Transitional Living through Intake, Comprehensive Assessment, Case Planning, Case Management and Tracking, Discharge/Case Closure, and Follow-up. Develop a service timeline for a "typical" homeless youth participant in each of the following four areas: 1) Outreach; 2) Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing; 3) Transitional Living and 4) youth not housed in the program. (The youth staying with a friend.) Include each activity and identify the staff person(s) who is responsible for leading and implementing each activity. Identify meaningful support and collaboration with key stakeholders in planning, designing and implementing all activities.
      5. SPENDING PLAN & NARRATIVE (Max 8 Points)
        Complete the Spending Plan Forms found in Appendix 1 of this RFA. Provide a detailed Budget Narrative which clearly describes how the specified resources and personnel have been cost allocated for the tasks and activities described in this application. Illustrate the use of state or federal funds, other than State Homeless Youth grant funds, that will be used to support the program.
        The Spending Plan and Narrative are to be prepared for a one year budget period, July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015.
        Include these forms as Attachment A of your application.
        (Note: the Spending plan spreadsheet has 3 separate tabs that must be completed.)
        Services funded under this Application may not be used to supplement contracted services for current wards of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services or for placement services available through CCBYS.
        • Administrative Costs
        • Indirect costs are not allowed under this grant. (These are costs that are not directly attributable to and necessary for the implementation of a specific program.) Funding allocated is intended to provide direct services to youth. It is expected that Direct Administrative costs will represent a small portion of the overall program budget and these Direct Administrative costs are capped at 20% of budget expenditures. "Direct Administrative" means those activities performed by staff and costs which are supportive of and required for project implementation for which there is no direct client contact such as fiscal staff, audit, clerical support, rent, utilities, insurance, general office equipment etc.
        • Sub-contractors:
          1. Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be pre-approved by the Department. These Agreements (or draft agreements) must be included in the application as Attachment A7.
          2. Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be on file with the Department.
          3. Any subcontractor shall be subject to the same provisions as the provider.
          4. The Provider shall retain sole responsibility for the performance of the sub-contractor.
      6. APPLICATION ATTACHMENTS
        Attachment A - Spending Plan & Narrative (Includes Sub-Contractors)
        Attachment A1 - Organizational Chart
        Attachment A2 - Resume of HY Coordinator, Agency Director and Fiscal Manager
        Attachment A3 - Job Descriptions
        Attachment A4 - Program Site & Transitional Living Placement Forms
        Attachment A5 - Copy of Current Child Welfare License(s) or Permit(s) - if Required
        Attachment A6 - Copies of Linkage Agreements for Service Referrals
        Attachment A7 - Copies of Sub-Contract Agreements or Draft Agreements
  5. Application Scoring

    • Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:
  • Criteria Score
    Executive Summary 10
    Agency Qualifications 30
    Narrative:  Introduction 2
    Narrative:  Methodology 35
    Work Plan 15
    Budget 8
    TOTAL 100 Points
  • SCORING CRITERIA
  • Executive Summary (Max 10 Points)
  • The applicant presented a description of services, the need for the services, its capacity to provide the services, the area in which the services will be delivered and the estimated number of participants to be served in the various program components.
  • Agency Qualifications (Max 30 Points)
    • Capability:  The applicant demonstrates experience and capacity to execute the proposed program.
    • Experience:  Applicant's history and focus provide a reasonable basis for the work proposed
    • Organization:  Organizational Chart, Resumes and Job Descriptions are included in Attachments A1 - A3. The resumes reflect sufficient expertise and experience to manage the proposed program. The applicant provides a plan to ensure staff maintains competencies regarding youth issues and service delivery methods.
    • Site Readiness:  The applicant indicated that it has immediate access to physical space in which homeless youth activities may be provided (e.g. existing, new construction) and describes in Attachment A4. The applicant presents a Site Information Form for each site and Transitional Living placement locations and includes them in Attachment A4
    • Safety:  The applicant presents a widely-accepted procedure for conducting background checks of staff members. A current license was provided in Attachment 5 for any facility in which youth under 18 will potentially be housed. Staffing ratios seem appropriate for adequate supervision and safety of both youth and staff. Safety protocols are in place for staff, participants, sites and facilities.
    • Reporting:  The applicant committed to using the IDHS eCornerstone system.
    • Site Information Forms / Transitional Living Placement Forms: The applicant has completed and submitted these forms and they are consistent with the proposed plan.
    • Sub-Contractor Information:  If sub-contractors are planned, copies of sub-contract agreements or draft agreements are provided in Attachment A7. These agreements sufficiently detail the expectations of the sub-contractor and are consistent with what was proposed.
  • Narrative (Max 37 Points)
  • The Narrative section consists of two parts, the Introduction and the Methodology.
    • Introduction (Max 2 Points)
      The applicant's plan to provide Outreach, Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing and Transitional Living to the homeless youth population is clear, concise and reflects a well thought out approach to address the needs identified for the proposed service area.
    • Methodology (Max 35 Points)
      • Continuum of Care: The applicant proposed a continuum of care that includes outreach, emergency shelter and transitional living services; a continuum that is flexible allowing participants to enter through one service area and move to others if appropriate.
      • Safety Assessments: The applicant describes a process for conducting Safety Assessments, and developing and implementing Emergency Care/Safety Plans to ensure that youth are safe and have their basic needs met. A description of how and where these services will be delivered also was presented. The described plan ensures that all youth in any program component will receive a Safety Assessment etc.
      • Outreach Services: The applicant discussed the content of Outreach Services to be provided and the locations. Outreach to youth where they congregate was described as well as various outreach events and activities. A clear path for programming and services was presented for the youth identified through outreach. An indication that services will be provided to youth regardless of the agency's ability to house the youth.
      • Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing: The applicant presented its ability to provide temporary housing for up to 120 days to homeless youth who are not wards of the state. The applicant stated that it has the capacity to house no fewer than four homeless youth at any given time in safe, clean and dry places. The applicant described the types of services to be provided to shelter youth. 24 hour staffing/supervision is described.
      • Transitional Living: The applicant describes the Transitional Living program model that includes accommodations for a minimum of four youth. The agency describes the types of living accommodations to be provided - host family homes, group homes, or supervised apartments. Supervised apartments are either agency-owned apartment buildings or "scattered-site" apartments, which are single-occupancy apartments rented directly by youth people with support from the agency. The proposed housing model(s) is in compliance with State and local licensing requirements. A vast array of services that include basic life skills training, including health promotion, life planning and goal setting, household management and budgeting, education opportunities, job training and employment services, interpersonal skill-building etc.
      • Care Delivery: The applicant delineates the service delivery process from Intake, Comprehensive Assessment, Case Planning, Case Monitoring/Tracking and Case Closure. The service delivery process demonstrates a strong understanding of and alignment with the Homeless Youth Program Standards. The applicant states that the service delivery process will be provided to both residents and non-residents of the shelter facilities.
      • Services: The applicant demonstrates the ability to provide directly, through subcontract or linkage agreements the following the required and additional services described in the RFA: Housing; Food; Needed goods; Benefits; Educational services; Life skills/independent living; Employment and/or vocational; Social skills; Prevention services; Individual Special population services; Substance abuse services; Legal services; Mental health service; Individual therapy; Physical health services; and Dental services.
      • Sub-contracts: If the applicant detailed sub-contracts to be utilized to provide services not provided directly or through linkage agreements. The sub-contractor budgets were provided in Attachment A.
      • Linkage Agreements: The applicant detailed linkages and referral procedures to community resources and services for those services not provided directly or through sub-contract. The linkage agreements were provided in Attachment A6.
      • Cultural and Linguistic Competence: Applicant makes a convincing case for its ability to provide services in a linguistically and culturally competent manner. Applicant can provide examples of circumstances that demonstrate responses that were culturally and linguistically competent. Programs and services reflect an understanding of the cultural diversity of the community being served. Applicant states that bilingual staff or qualified interpreters are available if necessary.
  • Work Plan (Max 15 Points)
    The applicant presented the activities necessary to provide a continuum of care for a "typical" homeless youth participant in: 1) Outreach; 2) Emergency Shelter/Interim Housing; 3) Transitional Living and 4) youth not housed in the program. (The youth staying with a friend.) The applicant identified when/where the activities are delivered and the individual(s) responsible for each activity. The work plan identified criteria by which a youth might move from one component to another should space be available.
  • Spending Plan & Narrative (Max 8 Points)
    The applicant presented a Spending Plan and Narrative that clearly describes how the specified resources and personnel are allocated for the tasks and activities described in this application. It is clear items are cost allocated where appropriate and sufficient detail is provided that shows the calculations and methodologies utilized to arrive at amounts. A Spending Plan and Narrative was included for each identified sub-contractor. Indirect costs are not included and administrative costs appear to be at or under 20%.
  • Application Attachments
    Although this section is not scored individually, points will be deducted in the above sections if these items are not included as directed. Further, failure to submit the appropriate licenses (permits if license is not yet issued) if the proposed approach requires it may result in immediate disqualification of the application.

APPLICATION CONTENT CHECKLIST

APPENDICES