Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services (CCBYS) - Program Standards

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.

A. Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services (CCBYS) - Program Standards

Section I - DEFINITIONS

Abuse - Physical, sexual or emotional mistreatment of a child under the age of 18 by a parent, caretaker, someone living in the home, or an immediate family member or paramour of the child's parent (325 ILCS 5/3).

Agency arranged placement - Temporary placement of a youth under 18 in a facility licensed by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services.

Basic Center - Federally-funded program that provides youth with emergency shelter, food, clothing, counseling, family reunification when possible, and referrals as needed.

Case management services - All direct service activities, excluding crisis intervention services, that reconnect the youth with family, school and community, including assistance given to parents or other significant adults (e.g., placement resources, relatives, school personnel) and are directed toward establishing and maintaining age-appropriate family, school and community involvement.

Child Welfare Agency (CWA) License - License issued to Illinois agencies by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) that meet criteria specified in Ill. Admin. Code 401, "Licensing Standards for Child Welfare Agencies."

Crisis intervention - Immediate assessment by the CCBYS agency of the facts surrounding a crisis situation involving a youth, and efforts to reunify the youth with his/her family or make arrangements for temporary safe shelter.

Cross-agency case coordination - CCBYS agencies must work in close collaboration with other service providers in the community, in order to provide comprehensive services to youth. Other entities may include local law enforcement, mental health agencies, court services, substance abuse treatment programs, schools, Safe Place, vocational programs and the Department of Children and Family Services. Additionally CCBYS agencies must collaborate with other agencies to resolve issues around out-of-service area runaways, lockouts, and/or transportation.

Dependent/abandoned youth - Any youth under the age of 18 who is without a parent, guardian or legal custodian; or who is without proper care because of the physical or mental disability, disinterest, or inability of his/her parent, guardian or custodian.

Family Generated Placement - A placement outside of the family home that is agreeable to the minor and the parent, guardian or custodian.

Home CCBYS agency - The CCBYS agency located in the youth's home community

Homeless youth - For the purposes of the CCBYS program, any youth under the age of 18 who is currently without permanent housing or who is in imminent danger of losing permanent housing, and who is not a ward of the State of Illinois.

Licensed arrangements - Foster homes, group homes or shelter care licensed by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) to provide shelter to minors.

Limited custody - A law enforcement officer may, with or without a warrant, take into custody for up to six hours a minor whom the law enforcement officer reasonably determines is: 1) absent from home without consent of the minor's parent, guardian or custodian; or 2) in circumstances which constitute a substantial or immediate danger to the minor's physical safety (per the Illinois Juvenile Court Act, ILCS 405/3-4).

Local CCBYS agency - The CCBYS agency in the community where the youth is currently physically located.

Lockout - The parent or caregiver has denied the child access to the home and has refused or failed to make provisions for another living arrangement for the child.

Neglect - Failure to provide adequate supervision, food, clothing, shelter, medical services or other basic needs for a child under the age of 18 (325 ILCS 5/3).

Parent - The father or mother of a child, including any adoptive parent or legal guardian (per the Illinois Juvenile Court Act, ILCS 405/1-3(11)).

Runaway - Youth under age 18 who is absent from home without parental consent.

Youth/family advocacy - Assisting the youth and/or family in communicating with authority figures, institutions and/or community agencies (e.g., courts, schools, hospitals, state agencies).

Youth Transitional Housing Program - a program licensed by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services specifically to serve partially emancipated youth ages 16 or 17 years old (Emancipation of Minors Act, found at 750 ILCS 30).

Section II - PROGRAM DEFINITION

The Comprehensive Community Based Youth Services program serves youth 11-17 years old that are at risk of involvement in the child welfare and/or juvenile justice system with the overarching goal of family reunification and/or stabilization. It is authorized by the Children and Family Services Act (20 ILCS 505/17 and 17a), and implements Article 3 of the Illinois Juvenile Court Act of 1987 (705 ILCS 405/3 et seq.) A continuum of services is available and provided to youth in high-risk situations, and to their families when appropriate, in accordance to their needs with the goal of family preservation, reunification and/or family stabilization, or independence. A 24-hour crisis intervention response system is available in emergency situations for referrals from youth, parents/guardians, police, courts, schools, Safe Place and the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), etc.

MANDATED PROGRAMMING:

CCBYS agencies are mandated to accept any youth age 11-17 in the Core and Lock-Out Populations below. This includes youth who have not yet reached their 18th birthday, and excludes wards of the State.

Note: CCBYS does not provide services to wards of the State. If the youth is a ward of the State, the CCBYS agency must notify DCFS.

Core Population - Any minor, 11-17 years of age (1) who is (a) absent from home without consent of parent, guardian or custodian, or (b) beyond the control of his or her parent, guardian or custodian, in circumstances which constitute a substantial or immediate danger to the minor's physical safety; and (2) who, after being taken into limited custody and offered interim crisis intervention services, refuses to return home after the minor and his or her parent, guardian or custodian cannot agree to an arrangement for an alternative voluntary residential placement or to the continuation of such placement.

NOTE: It is not necessary to refer a youth to police in order for the youth to be eligible for CCBYS services.

Lock-Out Population - In accordance with DCFS Rule 300.150, and Procedure 300.90, any minor, age 11-17, whose parent or caregiver has denied the child access to the home and has refused or failed to make provisions for another living arrangement for the child will be considered a lockout. Lock-out reports can be initiated by, but not limited to, law enforcement, jails, detention centers, hospitals or treatment/rehabilitation facilities or a CCBYS agency.

All initial reports of lock-outs shall be taken at the State Central Register as neglect reports and transmitted to the local DCFS investigation unit. DCFS shall defer initiation of the investigation until the CCBYS agency has had ample opportunity to provide crisis intervention services. The CCBYS agency shall respond and provide crisis intervention services to all youth ages 11 through 17 and their families for up to 48 hours including weekends and holidays.

If, after the provision of crisis intervention services, the parents still deny the child access to the home and refuse or fail to make provisions for another living arrangement, the crisis intervention worker shall contact and notify the local DCFS Investigation Specialist or Investigation Supervisor. DCFS shall then proceed to conduct an investigation pursuant to Procedures 300 and shall take temporary protective custody if appropriate. The CCBYS agency does not have the authority to place the youth beyond 48 hours including weekends and holidays.

CCBYS agency staff should never sign for discharge of a youth from jails, detention centers, hospitals or treatment/rehabilitation facilities.

DISCRETIONARY PROGRAMMING:

Discretionary Population (ages 11-17) - Individualized services for youth may be provided as resources allow and based on the needs of the community including, but not limited to:

  • Station-adjusted - youth who have been station-adjusted (i.e., arrested but not referred to court) or placed on probation supervision to prevent further involvement in the juvenile justice system.
  • Juvenile Justice System Referral - Youth who have committed a delinquent offense and are referred by local law enforcement or probation departments.
  • Youth who have been placed on probation/parole and who are at high risk of violating probation/parole or re-offending.
  • Risk-taking behavior - youth who are involved in risk-taking behavior (e.g., gang involvement, violence, drugs, etc.).
  • Child or sibling of a Prisoner - youth who have parents or siblings that are incarcerated.
  • Accompanied Homeless Youth.
  • Any/All Risk Levels - Youth who present as 'medium or low risk' on the Youth Assessment and Screening Instrument (YASI) and require intervention services.
  • Youth Age 10 - Youth, age 10, if provider resources allow and there is a need for such services within the community.
  • Truancy Intervention Services.

Section III - INITIAL CONTACT AND DISPOSITION

  1. Initial Contact - When a call is made to the local CCBYS agency, that agency must respond to the referral source within 15 minutes, either by phone or personal appearance.
  2. Disposition - The CCBYS agency must make an initial determination as to whether the case is a mandatory or discretionary CCBYS case. For mandatory cases, please refer to Section IV "Mandatory Cases," below. For discretionary cases, please refer to Section V "Discretionary Cases," below.

Section IV - MANDATORY CASES

Face-to-Face Intervention - If it is determined that the case is mandatory; CCBYS agency staff must conduct a face-to-face intervention, as follows:

  1. Face-to-Face Intervention - If it is determined that the case is mandatory; CCBYS agency staff must conduct a face-to-face intervention, as follows:
    1. In urban and suburban areas, within 60 minutes from the time it is determined the case is mandatory.
    2. In rural areas, within 90 minutes from the time it is determined the case is mandatory.
  2. Crisis/Safety Assessment - CCBYS agency staff must conduct a crisis/safety assessment, through discussion/interview with the youth; the family should be included, whenever possible. The information to be gathered should include, but not be limited to, the youth's name and age, and an assessment of the presenting problem, as indicated by:
    1. Legal history
    2. Family dynamics, including history of abuse, neglect and/or family substance abuse. (Please refer to Section F, "Situations Requiring Immediate Referral.")
    3. School status (including history of truancy and behavior problems)
    4. Mental health issues (including suicidal ideation, homicidal ideation, reality impairment, and psychotropic medication) (Please refer to Section F, "Situations Requiring Immediate Referral.")
    5. Medical history
    6. Substance abuse history of youth
    7. History of social involvement (including gang affiliation)
  3. Crisis Intervention Plan - Following the crisis/safety assessment, and before the youth and/or family leave the site of intervention, the case worker must develop a written crisis intervention plan, with input from the youth and family, briefly outlining the next steps to be taken to address the immediate crisis.
    1. The crisis intervention plan will include, at a minimum, information about where the youth will sleep that night and a very basic plan for the agency's next contact with him or her.
    2. The crisis intervention plan must be signed by the youth, the case worker, and members of the immediate family who are available. If the youth and/or family member(s) refuse to sign the crisis intervention plan, a note to this effect must be made on the plan and kept on file at the agency.
    3. It is expected that the agency will begin the process of case management with the youth based on the crisis intervention plan. The crisis intervention plan will be revised as needed.
  4. Illinois Youth Out of Service Area - If the crisis/safety assessment indicates that the youth is from another CCBYS service area within the state of Illinois, the local CCBYS agency will work with the home CCBYS agency to arrange transfer of the case and transportation of the youth to the home agency.
    1. Location for transfer - At a minimum, the two agencies must meet at a location halfway between them, unless the two agencies are able to work out a mutually agreeable location for transfer.
    2. Time frame for transfer - This transfer should occur as quickly as possible, but must occur within 24 clock hours, unless another time frame is mutually agreed upon by both agencies and remains in the best interests of the youth. If the distance between the two agencies is less than 20 miles, the transfer must take place within three (3) clock hours, unless another time frame is mutually agreed upon by the two agencies and is in the best interests of the youth.
    3. The agencies must obtain written evidence of parental permission or limited custody in any situation where a youth is transferred to another CCBYS provider or placed in a licensed placement.
  5. Out-of-State Youth - The goal with youth who are from out of state is to return them to their home community as quickly as possible. CCBYS agencies may release a non-delinquent juvenile to their parent/legal guardian within the first 24-hours (excluding weekends and holidays) of detainment. After 24-hours, the CCBYS agency must contact the Juvenile Interstate Compact Administrator at the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (217-557-1030 ext. 5204) who will assist in determining the disposition of the youth. Please refer to the Interstate Commission for Juveniles Compact Rules, RULE 600 Return of Juveniles for further information.
    Return of non-delinquent juveniles within 24-hours
    1. Direct Transportation to the Home State: The CCBYS agency may directly transport the youth to his/her home state within the first 24-hours of detainment. The CCBYS agency should inform the youth of additional resources available to him/her, including the National Runaway Switchboard's Home Free Program (1-800-621-4000). The CCBYS agency should make an effort to assure that the youth arrives safely at his/her destination, that appropriate linkages are set up, that the family is contacted to determine how those linked services are working out, and that the youth is contacted to assure that the situation has been stabilized.
    2. Collaboration with Basic Center (BC) - If it is the most efficient means of reunifying the family and it is practical to do so, the CCBYS agency may work in collaboration with the local federally funded BC to arrange temporary care and/or overnight placement, as appropriate, while working to arrange transfer back to the home state. It is the responsibility of the CCBYS agency to be aware of the closest BC. If the CCBYS agency is not also a BC, it will be the responsibility of the CCBYS agency to establish a cooperative agreement, for the purpose of providing an Agency-Arranged Placement (AAP) to out-of-state youth. The CCBYS agency will provide all pertinent information to the BC in order to complete the transfer of the case.
  6. Situations Requiring Immediate Referral and Agency Response
    1. Types of Situations Requiring Immediate Referral
      • Abuse/Neglect - If the crisis assessment indicates that the situation involves abuse or neglect of the youth, CCBYS agency staff are mandated by law (325 ILCS 5) to notify the DCFS abuse/neglect hotline (1-800-25ABUSE).
      • Psychiatric/Substance Abuse Emergency - If the crisis assessment indicates that they youth may need services in addition to those offered by CCBYS because he/she needs assessment for acute psychiatric or substance abuse care or appears to be a danger to himself or others, the CCBYS agency immediately ensures linkage to appropriate services, as needed.
    2. The CCBYS agency response
      • The CCBYS agency must continue to work the case until the family situation is stabilized, as described below. This includes identifying and facilitating alternative housing, if necessary.
      • The CCBYS agency is responsible for assuring that appropriate linkages are set up, meeting with the family to determine how those linked services are working out and initiating a contact with the youth in order to assure that the situation has been stabilized.
      • If the youth becomes involved in multiple service systems, the CCBYS agency assumes responsibility for case management and systems coordination on behalf of the youth while the case remains open.

Section V - PROCEDURES

  1. Immediate Family Reunification - If family reunification is immediately accomplished:
    1. The youth returns home.
    2. The CCBYS agency must make phone contact within 24 hours of the youth's returning home, excluding weekends and court holidays, to engage the youth and family in services in an effort to stabilize the family situation.
    3. The CCBYS agency must make face-to-face contact with the youth and family within 48 hours of the youth's returning home, excluding weekends and court holidays, for the purpose of engaging the youth in services.
    4. Case management then proceeds as described in Section V(c) "Case Management," below.
  2. Pending Family Reunification - If family reunification cannot be immediately accomplished, the agency then assures that arrangements are made for temporary placement in the least restrictive setting available, through one of the following two options:
    1. Family-Generated Placement (FGP): The youth and parent agree upon a placement outside the family home, if such a placement is available to the youth. Placement in an FGP is preferable to other alternative placements.
      1. An FGP may include placement with friends, relatives, or another mutually agreed upon resource.
      2. Youth placed in a FGP remain in the legal custody of the parent during the temporary living arrangement period.
      3. Any youth in placement must have the opportunity for visits with his/her family, unless it is not feasible due to factors such as distance or refusal to visit. The agency will develop a visitation plan, in conjunction with the youth and his/her family.
      4. Consent to medical care of youth placed in temporary living arrangement remains the right and responsibility of the youth's parent. When the youth's parent refuses to consent to emergency medical care or when the parent cannot be contacted, a hospital or physician licensed to practice medicine in all its branches may render emergency treatment per Section 3 of the Consent by Minors to Medical Procedures Act (410 ILCS 210/3).
      5. The CCBYS agency should assist the family in assuring that the youth's education is not interrupted during placement.
      6. If the FGP is a temporary situation, the CCBYS agency continues to meet with the family to work toward reunification.
      7. Case management then proceeds as described in Section V(c), "Case Management," below.
    2. Agency-Arranged Placement (AAP): If an FGP is not feasible or available, CCBYS must arrange for temporary placement in a licensed setting.
      1. Parental permission should be secured for placement of the youth by the agency. In the event that permission is not secured, the CCBYS agency must ensure that the local law enforcement authorities take limited custody so that CCBYS has the authority to make temporary placement without parental consent. Agencies may use their discretion in obtaining limited custody for youth being placed with parental consent.
      2. The CCBYS agency must assure that the placement facility is licensed by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS).
      3. The CCBYS agency must determine that the assessed needs of the youth are consistent with the services provided by the placement facility.
      4. The CCBYS agency must assure that youth who need placement are placed in the least restrictive setting available which most closely approximates a family and in which the youth's needs will be met.
      5. The CCBYS agency must assure that youth are placed within reasonable proximity to their homes, taking into account any special needs of the youth and family and the availability of the service resources needed for the youth and family.
      6. Any youth in placement must have the opportunity for visits with his/her family unless it is not feasible due to factors such as distance or refusal to visit. The CCBYS agency must facilitate visits between the youth and his/her family.
      7. Consent to medical care of youth placed in temporary Living arrangements remains the right and responsibility of the youth's parent. When the youth's parent refuses to consent to emergency medical care or when the parent cannot be contacted, a hospital or physician licensed to practice medicine in all its branches may render emergency treatment per Section 3 of the Consent by Minors to Medical Procedures Act (410 ILCS 210/3).
      8. In compliance with the McKinney-Vento Act of 2001 (42 U.S.C. 11431 et seq.), the CCBYS agency must make every attempt to assure that the youth's education is not interrupted during placement. The youth will attend the same school in which he/she was enrolled at the time of placement, unless factors such as distance make this impossible or burdensome.
      9. Case management then proceeds as described in Section IV (D)(5)(c), "Case Management," below.
    3. Case Management Process - The CCBYS agency must proceed with case management as follows:
      1. The agency must work with the youth to develop a case plan based on the results of an individual assessment process, as prescribed by the Department, identifying goals and outcomes to be accomplished.
      2. Provide services either directly or through referral to other service agencies, until goals are substantially achieved. In situations where services are referred out; it remains the responsibility of the CCBYS agency to monitor the youth's progress toward goals.
      3. It is anticipated that a CCBYS case will take an average of 60-90 days from intake to termination. There must be documentation in the file if the case is prolonged beyond 60-90 days, stating the reason for continuing the case.
      4. Provide follow-up services: Three months after the case is closed, the CCBYS agency must initiate contact with the youth to assure that the situation continues to be stable. If necessary, the case should be reopened to provide additional needed services.
      5. Court Intervention - After 21 days of being taken into limited custody, if all attempts at family reunification or FGP have been unsuccessful and the case is not a lockout, the CCBYS agency may file a Minors Requiring Authoritative Intervention (MRAI) petition, in accordance with 705 ILCS 405/3.

Section VI - DISCRETIONARY CASES

  1. Whether to Take the Case - If the case is determined to be Discretionary, the CCBYS agency must make a decision as to whether to take the case and proceed with assessing the youth. This decision must be based upon a realistic assessment of the agency's available resources (time, staff, and funds) and the potential impact that taking the case would have on the agency's ability to serve mandatory cases throughout the fiscal year.
  2. Assessment -The CCBYS agency administers a YASI as prescribed by the Department, enrolling those youth who are determined to be at significant risk.
  3. Case Plan -The agency will establish a written case plan outlining the goals and outcomes to be accomplished.
    1. The case plan must be signed by the youth, the case worker, and members of the immediate family who are available. If the youth and/or family member(s) refuse to sign the case plan, a note to this effect must be made on the plan and kept on file at the agency.
    2. It is expected that the agency will begin the process of case management with the youth based on the case plan. The case plan will be revised as needed.
    3. The CCBYS agency and the youth develop a case plan based on the results of the assessment, identifying goals and outcomes to be accomplished.
    4. The CCBYS agency manages the case, and provides services either directly or through referral to other service agencies, until goals are substantially achieved. In situations where services are referred out, it remains the responsibility of the CCBYS agency to monitor the youth's progress toward goals.
    5. It is anticipated that a CCBYS case will take an average of 60-90 days from intake to termination. There must be documentation in the file if the case is prolonged beyond 60-90 days.
    6. Follow-up: Three months after the case is closed, the CCBYS agency must have documented attempt(s) to contact the youth to assure that the situation continues to be stable. If necessary, the case will be re-opened to provide additional needed services.

Section VII - RANGE OF SERVICES

  1. The needs of the youth and family are met through a variety of services. Services or needs identified by the assessment must be provided as needed either directly by the agency and/or through service linkage and/or collaborations with other service providers and/or purchase of care.
  2. Allowable services are limited to enrolled CCBYS clients and services are limited to the following: 24-hour response system; crisis assessment; crisis intervention; family preservation/stabilization/reunification; temporary living arrangements; individual, family and/or group counseling, including cognitive behavioral skills and life skills; youth and/or family advocacy; access and coordination with substance abuse treatment and/or mental health treatment; cross-agency case coordination; and case management.
  3. Crisis intervention services must be available on a 24-hour basis, and the CCBYS agency agrees to maintain adequate staff coverage to meet this service requirement. A crisis log of all incoming crisis calls will be maintained. This log will include all items necessary to track each instance and will include at a minimum: who placed the call (name, agency, call-back number and location of crisis), staff name who received/answered the call, date and time of the call, crisis worker assigned to the case, the client's name and initial crisis complaint (lockout, runaway, etc.). The CCBYS agency will provide current/updated crisis contact information to the DHS Statewide Information Line at (877) 870-2663.
  4. Temporary living arrangement services must be available on a 24-hour basis. The CCBYS agency must have a sufficient number of licensed foster homes to meet the needs of the youth throughout the service area. This may also include licensed shelter placements. The provider must have the ability to place special needs or difficult to place youth, and a procedure for what to do if all agency identified placement options are at capacity, or unwilling to place youth.
  5. Family preservation/reunification/stabilization services are services delivered to the youth and/or family to help the youth and the youth's parents resolve and cope with family problems and disruptive behaviors in order to preserve the youth in his or her family home or to reunite the youth with his or her family. Family preservation services include, but not limited to, crisis intervention services, individual and/or family counseling and advocacy.
  6. Counseling is provided to youth and families to assist them in resolving or coping with problems, behaviors or trauma which adversely affects the youth and impacts his or her ability to adjust to family, school or community as well as in identifying, obtaining and using community resources and services.
  7. Advocacy services are provided for youth and their families to assist them in resolving personal family and social/institution problems. Advocacy services include, but are not limited to, activity with the youth which provides emotional support, role modeling, personal and family resource development, accompanying the youth and family to appropriate court appearances and/or appointments with court personnel and providing or arranging for transportation to those appearances and/or appointments.
  8. Employment and education assistance are provided to youth in applying for, locating and securing employment and training for employment and in obtaining access to educational programs and achieving educational goals.
  9. Access to substance abuse and/or mental health treatment is provided to youth experiencing problems with polydrug and alcohol abuse and/or mental health issues.
  10. CCBYS agencies must ensure that linkages and referral procedures are formed with other community programs which provide needed services not available within their own program. Agreements should be established with drug, alcohol, mental health treatment programs, and employment and training programs to assure that youth may be referred and have access to such programs. Copies of these agreements are to be kept on file at the provider agency.
  11. Each youth and family served shall have a written case plan established between the CCBYS agency and the youth and family served. The case plan will be developed based on the results of the YASI, utilizing the Department's data system. Other assessments may also be used as appropriate. The case plan is individualized to the youth's particular needs and will include goals and outcomes developed with and on behalf of the youth. The case plan will include services necessary to accomplish those goals. Both the YASI and the case plan must be recorded in the data system. The case plan must be monitored by a case manager who assumes full responsibility for case management activities. The case plan must be signed and dated by the youth, case manager and available family member and must be kept in the client file.
  12. Upon notification from the Juvenile Court, the CCBYS agency shall either prepare or participate in the preparation of court reports in the manner as approved by the Court. Such reports shall be submitted to the Court and a copy kept in the client's file at the agency.
  13. A locked, confidential record keeping system must include a standardized file on all clients. Each client file shall include, but not be limited to supporting documentation for the following:
    1. Initial crisis intervention plan
    2. Intake information
    3. YASI Pre-Screen, YASI Full Assessment, YASI Closing Assessment and any Re-assessments
    4. All Placement information including location(s), dates, etc. and either written permission of parent/guardian or a copy of the limited custody agreement
    5. Signed and dated case plan
    6. Other legal documents and agreements for care, as appropriate, and case notes reflective of the ongoing care and treatment of the youth, and
    7. A discharge plan that includes the youth's progress during service and recommendations and measures taken by the CCBYS agency for aftercare and follow-up that will ensure family preservation. If family reunification cannot be attained, the plan must contain the reasons for failure to reunify the family and the plan for the youth's living situation and interim objectives that will accomplish an eventual return, if possible.
    8. Documentation of 30 day follow-up contact/results.
  14. CCBYS services to each client must be documented using the Department's data system. CCBYS crisis intervention staff are mandated to attend YASI and data system trainings. At a minimum, the following items and time requirements will be followed:
    1. Youth must be enrolled in the data system within 72 hours of the initial contact date (initial crisis).
    2. YASI Pre-Screen must be completed (information gathered to complete at initial contact) and entered in the data system within 14 days of the initial contact date.
    3. YASI Full Assessment must be completed and entered in the data system within 30 days of the initial contact date.
    4. The Case Plan must be initiated in the data system within 15 days of completing the YASI Full Assessment.
    5. YASI Closing Assessment must be completed and entered in the data system at the youth's exit from the CCBYS program. Inability to complete this assessment must be documented in the youth's file, and therefore, the youth's participation in the program may not be considered successful.
    6. YASI Re-assessments must be completed and entered in the data system every 90 days, as necessary. Any YASI Re-assessment may be considered the closing assessment if it is conducted at case closure.
    7. Enrollment in the data system must be terminated within 72 hours of exiting the CCBYS program and completion of the YASI Closing Assessment. The case plan must also be closed at this time.
  15. CCBYS agencies must exhibit cultural competence when serving youth with special needs, including those who are pregnant and parenting youth (including fathers); youth who are gay, lesbian, transgender or questioning their own sexual orientation; delinquent youth; and youth who are physically, emotionally or developmentally challenged. CCBYS agencies must also demonstrate their ability to provide service to persons who have Limited English Proficiency (LEP), persons who are hard of hearing or deaf, and persons with low literacy.
  16. In the event that family reunification of a youth who falls within either the mandatory or discretionary population is not viable, then one permanency option is to pursue partial emancipation. The CCBYS agency must verify to the court that family reunification has been attempted and is not viable for this particular youth. If the CCBYS agency intends to pursue partial emancipation of a youth, then the agency must contact a Youth Transitional Housing Program (YTHP) to determine if they have a bed available and that the program is willing to accept the youth, if he/she becomes partially emancipated. Once a placement is agreed to, then the CCBYS agency is responsible for initiating and completing the court process to have the youth become partially emancipated. Upon partial emancipation being granted, the CCBYS agency turns over case management and housing responsibilities to the YTHP.

Section VIII - ADMINISTRATION

Agency Licensing - CCBYS agencies must hold a valid Child Welfare Agency License issued by the Department of Children and Family Services (see 89 IL Admin Code 401 Licensing Standards for Child Welfare Agencies.)