Redeploy Illinois 2011 Annual Report - Youth Participants


Redeploy Illinois Program Youth Participants

In January 2011 the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board approved a new monthly data report for use by the Redeploy sites. This reporting format was designed for three purposes: 1) to collect information for inclusion in the program's annual reports to the Governor and General Assembly; 2) for monitoring and oversight by the RIOB and program staff; and 3) to provide data to sites to inform decision-making to ensure continued and improved program success. The Report includes information about program implementation, youth served, assessment, services, outcomes etc. Implementation has, in fact, provided valuable information, much of which is shared below. A review of the data collected has also highlighted the need for some revision in order to ensure consistency and improved accuracy of the reported data.

The information that follows describes the youth who participated in the Redeploy Illinois program during calendar year 2011. For the new clients enrolled during this year (265) we present a look into their demographics, legal status and history with the juvenile justice system. Information about new and continuing clients (376) includes services and assessments provided during the year. Finally, for those youth who terminated the Redeploy program during 2011 (166), an overview of participant outcomes is described.

During calendar year 2011, there were 376 youth participating in the Redeploy Illinois program, 265 new clients and 111 continuing clients (Figure 1).

FIGURE 1: Clients (Youth) in the Redeploy Illinois Program, by Site, CY2011

Figure 1: Clients (Youth) in the Redeploy Illinois Program, by Site, CY2011

Description of Figure 1: Clients (Youth) in the Redeploy Illinois Program, by Site, CY2011

Breakdown of clients by site: 94 - 2nd Circuit, 15 - 4th Circuit, 48 - Lee County, 33 - McLean County, 14 - Macon County, 44 - Madison County, 96 - Peoria County, and 32 - St. Clair County.

Demographics of Redeploy Youth

The information presented here highlights the demographics of the 265 youth who were newly enrolled in the Redeploy program during calendar year 2011. Appendix 1 provides detail on the demographic of the entire youth population of the Redeploy counties.

TABLE 1:  New Clients by Age and Gender, CY2011

Age Male Female Total
Under 10 0 0 0
10 - 12 1 0 1
13 - 14 45 8 53
15 62 7 69
16 61 6 67
17 28 7 35
18 or oder 4 2 6
Missing/Unknown - - 34
TOTAL 201 30 265

Seventy-six percent (76%) of all youth enrolled during calendar year 2011 were male, 11% were female. The gender of the remaining 13% was unreported.

Fifty-one percent (51%) of all youth enrolled during calendar year 2011 were 15 or 16 years old, 20% were 13 or 14, and 13% were 17 or older.

FIGURE 2:  Youth 13-16 in Redeploy Service Areas

Figure 2 Youth 13-16 in Redeploy Service Areas

Description of Figure 2 Youth 13-16 in Redeploy Service Areas

Ethnicity % of Youth 13-16
Mixed/Other 2%
African American 18%
Caucasian 80%

FIGURE 3: New Redeploy Illinois Clients, 2011

Figure 3 New Redeply Illinois Clients, 2011

Description of Figure 3 New Redeply Illinois Clients, 2011

Ethnicity New Redeploy Illinois Clients
Caucasian 48%
African American 33%
Mixed/Oher 6%
Missing 13%

Forty-eight percent (48%) of all youth enrolled during calendar year 2011 were Caucasian, 33% were African American, while the general population of youth is 83% Caucasian and 19% African American. (Appendix 1)

Ninety-four percent (94%) of all youth enrolled during calendar year 2011 were Non-Hispanic. This compares to a Non-Hispanic youth population of 96%. (Appendix 1)

Juvenile Justice System Involvement of Redeploy Youth

Presenting Offense

Of the 265 new clients who entered the Redeploy Illinois program in 2011, 221 (83%) were being charged with committing felony offenses. The remainder were charged with misdemeanor offenses. Figure 4 below shows the breakdown of the number of clients charged with felonies (221) by seriousness of the offense. Overall, of the 221 admissions for felony offenses, the majority (38%) were for a Class 2 offense. These offenses carry with them a commitment term of 3 to 7 years.

FIGURE 4:  Number of New Clients by Felony Offense, CY2011

Figure 4 Number of New Clients by Felony Offense, CY2011

Description of Figure 4 Number of New Clients by Felony Offense, CY2011

Felony Type New Redeploy Clients
Class 1 14%
Class 2 38%
Class 3 18%
Class 4 30%

By statute, felonies are classified by seriousness of offense (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-10). Class X and Class M are the most serious offense levels and youth charged with these offenses are not eligible for the Redeploy Illinois program.

Class 1 felonies are the most serious and Class 4 felonies are the least serious. Felonies are classified, for the purpose of sentencing, as follows:

  • Class 1 (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-30), sentence of 4 to 15 years
  • Class 2 (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-35), sentence of 3 to 7 years
  • Class 3 (730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-40), sentence of 2 to 5 years
  • Class 4 (730 ILCS 5/5.4.5-45), sentence of 1 to 3 years

FIGURE 5:  Percent Felony Offenses by Crime Type, CY2011

Figure 5 Percent Felony Offenses by Crime Type, CY2011

Description of Figure 5 Percent Felony Offenses by Crime Type, CY2011

Crime Type % Felony Offenses
Sex 1%
Violations 1%
Drug 3%
Property 57%
Person 35%
Other 3%

The figure above presents a breakdown of the 221 youth charged with felony offense by the type of crime. For these 221 youth, property offenses were the most common type of offense reported, at 57% followed by person offenses. Fifty-four percent (54%) of the property offenses were Class 2 felonies; 18% Class 1; 18% Class 4; and 10% Class 3. Forty-two percent (42%) of the person offenses were Class 4 felonies; 35% Class 3; 15% Class 2; and 8% Class 1.

Legal Status

Information was gathered on the legal status of youth at the time of admission into the Redeploy Illinois program. It is important to note that the same youth may be reported in more than one legal status. Sites reported that 74% of the 201 male youth were on probation at the time of admission; 20% were completing court ordered community service; and 19% had a current conditional discharge or were on supervision. Thirty-three percent (33%) of the 30 female youth were on probation; 27% were on a conditional discharge or on supervision; and 20% had a pending court case or adjudication. None of the females were performing community services.

TABLE 2:  Legal Status of All New Clients at Admission, CY2011

Legal Status

% of all

males

(n=21)

% of all

females

(n=30)

% of

total

(N-231*)

Community service 20% 0% 17%
Conditional discharge/supervision 19% 27% 20%
Pending court case/adjudication 17% 20% 17%
Probation 74% 33% 68%

* 34 youth were reported with "unknown" gender and not included in calculations

Prior System Involvement

Sites collected information on the youth's prior juvenile justice system involvement (excluding the presenting offense). It is important to note that the same youth may be reported in more than one category. Site reports indicate that 68% of the 201 male youth had prior arrests at the time of admission; 32% had prior detention admissions; and 3% had prior station adjustments. Fewer than 1% had a prior IDJJ commitment. Females reportedly had a lesser degree of prior system involvement. Of the 30 female youth, 23% had prior arrests; 17% had prior detention center admissions; and 10% had prior station adjustments. None had a prior commitment to IDJJ.

TABLE 3:  Prior History of New Clients in the Juvenile Redeploy Illinois Program, CY2011

Prior History

% of all

males

(n=201)

% of all

females

(n=30)

% of

total

(n=213*)

Has prior station adjustments 3% 10% 4%
Has prior arrests 68% 23% 62%
Has prior admissions to detentions 21% 17% 30%
Has prior DJJ commitments <1% 0% <1%

* 34 youth were reported with "unknown" gender and not included in calculations

Of the youth enrolled in the Redeploy program in 2011, 68% were on probation at the time of admission to the program, 62% had prior arrests and 30% had prior detention center admissions.

Services and Assessments

All youth involved in Redeploy are screened and assessed by staff using a variety of tools. All youth receive a screening/assessment by probation staff prior to admission into the program. Additional assessments may be court ordered, conducted on an as-needed basis, and/or determined by the needs of youth once they are in the Redeploy program. These screenings and assessments are used by staff to determine service needs of youth, the risk of re-offending, and for determining flight and safety risks that may be present. They are also used to identify a variety of other potential issues, such as behavioral or mental health issues, substance abuse, exposure to trauma, and other issues.

During calendar year 2011, the most common assessments conducted were for mental health, substance abuse, and behavioral issues. The graph that follows (Figure 6) shows the number of screenings and assessments done for Redeploy youth during 2011 that resulted in an identified need. This graph further depicts the number of youth accepted into the needed services identified by those assessments. This chart does not reflect the total numbers of assessments/screens conducted.

FIGURE 6: Service Referrals and Service Acceptance for Redeploy Youth, CY2011

Figure 6 Service Referrals and Service Acceptance for Redeploy Youth, CY2011

Description of Figure 6 Service Referrals and Service Acceptance for Redeploy Youth, CY2011

Need Service Referred Service Accepted Service Not Accepted
Substance Abuse 161 128 15
Mental Health/Behavioral 125 99 4
Sex Offender 5 2 0
Other 69 48 7

During CY2011, the majority (77%) of youth referred to services were accepted into programs that addressed specific issues. However, seven percent (7%) were not accepted into programs to address those identified needs. The most common reason for non-admission into a substance abuse or other type of program was the refusal of the client to participate, while the most common reason for non-admission into a mental health/behavioral program was the lack of available slots.

Youth who participated in Redeploy Illinois received services in several areas including substance abuse and mental health treatment; cognition therapy; education/employment/life skills; family focused treatment; restorative, as well as others. Table 4 below identifies the various types of services tracked within each service area.

A review of the service data by site indicates a need to refine the data collection process. However, an analysis of service data reported for the final six months of 2011 indicated the following with respect to service provision:

In an average month:

  • 168 youth receive services
  • 80 youth receive services in the substance abuse and mental health category
  • 39 youth receive services in the cognition therapy category
  • 197 youth receive services in the education/employment/life skills category
  • 96 youth receive services in the family focused category
  • 90 youth receive services in the restorative services category
  • 80 youth receive services in the other category

It is important to remember that each category includes multiple services and that each youth may receive more than one type of service.

Insert TABLE 4:  Services provided to Juvenile Redeploy Illinois Clients by Service Type, CY2011

TYPE OF SERVICE Services provided to Juvenile Clients
Substance abuse/mental health treatment
  • Co-occurring disorders/MISA
  • Impatient drug/alcohol treatment
  • Outpatient drug/alcohol treatment
  • Mental health treatment
  • TASC
  • Gateway
  • Other substance abuse/mental health treatment
Cognition therapy
  • Anger management services
  • BRT/CBT
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Cognitive education (developmental disability treatment)
  • WAIT/ART
  • Other cognition therapy/treatment
Education/Employment/Life skills
  • Alternative education (GED or other alternative schooling)
  • Education/workforce placement
  • Life skills training
  • Mentoring services
  • Other education/job training/life skills
Family focused treatment
  • Family advocacy services
  • Functional family therapy
  • Multi-systemic therapy
  • Other family focused treatment
Restorative services
  • Community service
  • Restitution
  • Victim mediation panel
  • Youth court/peer jury
  • Other victim related services and/or counseling
  • Other restorative services
Other services
  • Services through DCFS
  • Individual therapy
  • Gender specific services
  • Recreation
  • Case management
  • Unknown

* Includes urine tests

Redeploy Program Termination

During calendar year 2011, 166 youth terminated from the Redeploy Program. Fifty-eight percent (58%) of those youth terminated successfully and 28% were considered unsuccessful. Fourteen percent (14%) were considered neutral at exit. The factors that determined success/non-success varied by site. Table 5 below provides detailed information regarding termination types.

TABLE 5:  Number of Clients Exiting Program by Termination Type, CY2011

Type of termination

Number of youth

Reported

Terminated successfully
Employed/enrolled in school 72
More engaged in school/have more positive approach to studies 29
Successfully having increased family support 51
Successfully having increased positive peer relations 35
Terminated unsuccessfully
Failure to appear in court or other violation of court order 8
Re-arrest 25
Failure to meet program requirements 18
Terminated neither successfully nor unsuccessfully
Screening/assessment determined the youth needed to be sent to another program 1
Youth transferred jurisdictions 2
Some other reason 9
Total youth terminated 151

* Youth may be counted in more than one category

Figure 7 provides information regarding the termination status of Redeploy youth exiting the program.

FIGURE 7:  Termination Status for Youth Exiting the Redeploy Program by CY2011

Figure 7 Termination Status for Youth Exiting the Redeploy Program in CY2011

Description of Figure 7 Termination Status for Youth Exiting the Redeploy Program in CY2011

Termination status of Redeploy youth exiting the program breakdown; successful being 96 %, unsuccessful being 46%, and neutral was 24%.

Table 6 below provides the termination status of youth exiting the program by site for CY2011 program terminations.

TABLE 6:  Number of Clients Exiting Program in CY 2011 by Site

County Successful Unsuccessful Neutral Total
Fourth Circuit 11 11 4 26
Lee 6 3 0 9
Macon 9 9 0 18
Madison 11 4 3 18
McLean 6 5 0 11
Peoria 12 5 0 17
Second Circuit 38 7 9 54
St. Clair 3 2 8 13
Total 96 46 24 166