Independent Living Annual Report 2011

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.
State of Illinois
Department of Human Services

Independent Living means different things to different people. For those steeped in the Independent Living Movement, it means having control of one's life. Living independently does not mean however, doing everything for one's self, but being in control of decisions made about one's self. This is the foundation from which Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are founded.

A Center for Independent Living is a private, non-residential, community-based, not-for-profit, consumer-controlled organization that is mandated to provide four core services: Advocacy, Peer Support, Independent Living Skills Development and Information and Referral. Staff serve as role models, demonstrating that people with disabilities can be independent and productive. Their knowledge, support and guidance help to create informed choice options that give consumers the confidence to pursue their own independence and to realize their dreams and aspirations.

In contrast to more traditional medical models in which the "client" or "patient" is highly dependent on "experts," a CIL's emphasis is on "consumer" self-direction and control. CILs promote a positive self-image, which is important to developing significant peer relationships.

What truly distinguishes and set CILs apart from other organizations is the fact that consumer control exists on every level, where at least fifty one percent of staff, management staff and the Board of Directors must be persons with disabilities. Having consumer control in decision-making positions is paramount to maintaining the integrity of what a CIL should and must be. The most challenging barrier however, for people with disabilities to overcome is attitude. To gradually dismantle this barrier, CILs advocate for changes in legislation, provide disability awareness-related activities, develop technical assistance initiatives regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and work in a committed fashion to deinstitutionalize people with disabilities who can and want to live independently.

Clearly, CILs are not social service agencies, but agents for social change.


Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living


Message

February 2012

Dear Colleague:

On behalf of the Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS),we are pleased to share the 2011 Annual Report on Independent Living in Illinois. This report is reflective of the active cooperation and support of the Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living (INCIL), whose numerous programmatic contributions make this year's report a vivid record of what independent living means to Illinoisans with disabilities as well as the Disability Rights Movement.

Illinois' 23 Centers for Independent Living (CILs), in accordance with their mission, provided services to 59,262 Illinois citizens with disabilities in federal fiscal year 2011. These citizens received information and referral as well as direct services in their communities from CIL staff. The majority of staff are persons with disabilities who demonstrate on a daily basis that persons with disabilities can, and do, lead independent and productive lives. Many of their successes are described in this report. 

We also commend the Centers for the work on the Community Reintegration Program. Their tireless efforts have increased the quality of life of more than 1,930 individuals and saved the state millions of dollars over the past decade. In 2011, there were 124 individuals reintegrated. In a similar vein, they have shown tremendous leadership in working with DHS and the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Steering Committee on the implementation of the innovative MFP system change grant.

In addition, the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established 18 years ago, in compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, and given authority for the planning of independent living services and policy activities. The new approved three year State Plan for Independent Living which determines how IL services will be provided in Illinois over the next three years (FFY'11 thru FFY'13) contains six major goals that are being implemented by INCIL and other community partners under the planning guidance of SILC. Those major goals are: Standardizing CILs' Consumer Satisfaction Surveys, Housing, Transportation, Employment, Access to Communication and Advocacy.

We will continue to work in partnership with INCIL and SILC to explore and implement effective strategies to improve the quality of life for all persons with disabilities in Illinois.

Sincerely,

Michelle R.B. Saddler 
Secretary
Illinois Department of Human Services 

Kristine Smith
Acting Director
Division of Rehabilitation Services


Establishment of Centers for Independent Living
and their Funding Sources 1980-2011

  • 1980 - Access Living - Federal
  • 1981 - RAMP - Federal
  • 1985 - SCIL and Peorial CIL (now AFA) - State
  • 1986 - SICIL, IMPACT, LIFE, and Fox River Valley (now FITE) - State
  • 1987 - IICIL and WGCIL - Federal
  • 1988 - PCIL and LINC - State
  • 1989 - OPTIONS - State
  • 1991 - LCCIL - Federal; DCIL and OFA CIL - State
  • 1995 - SAIL and WCICIL and a RAMP branch in DeKalb - State
  • 1996 - Stone-Hayes (SHCIL) - Federal
  • 1997 - JCIL - State - first CIL established under IDHS
  • 1998 - IVCIL - State
  • 2000 - GAIL CIL (now OFA) - State
  • 2005 - RAMP branch in Boone county - State
  • 2006 - OFA CIL expanded to include Clay, Effingham, Fayette, and Jasper counties - State

Independent Living Unit - Program Highlights - FY '11

  • CILs served 93 of Illinois' 102 counties.
  • Direct services and Information and Referral contact combined for FFY '11 was 59,196.
  • The Independent Living Unit (ILU) conducted four on-site full compliance reviews in FFY '11. Each review was a three-day process which covered the CILs programmatic, administrative and fiscal operations.
  • In addition to the regular on-site reviews, the ILU conducted seven on-site ARRA Part B funded reviews.
  • The ILU conducted 14 follow-up/monitoring reviews in FFY '11.
  • The ILU provided technical assistance to 23 CILs on 166 occasions during FFY '11.
  • The ILU conducted six program related trainings in FFY '11.
  • The ILU conducted seven fiscal/contract trainings in FFY '11.
  • The ILU conducted four operational trainings in FFY '11.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on boards of directors for FFY '11 was 74 percent which is a one percent increase from FFY '10.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on the administrative staff (decision making) of CILs for FFY '11 was 84 percent which is a one percent increase from FFY '10.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on staff for FFY '11 was 73 percent, which is a one percent increase from FFY '10 Legislative Internship Project.

Legislative Internship Project

Legislative Internship Project for Minorities with Disabilities and Individuals with Disabilities from Rural Communities

The Division of Rehabilitation Services' Independent Living Unit first awarded Legislative Internship grants to CILs to develop this project in FY 1998. This project provides opportunities for minorities, youth and those living in rural communities who have disabilities to learn about the legislative process. These opportunities enable participants to develop leadership and decision-making skills that enhance their ability to address legislative issues that impact them and their respective communities.

By engaging in and learning the basic components of the legislative process, individuals with disabilities can develop more effective interpersonal and communication skills while becoming more familiar with the process. Ultimately, participants will enhance their ability to self advocate and therefore, increase their potential for growth and independence.


From Institutionalization to Reintegration

More than 10,000 people in Illinois nursing homes have the capability to live independently within the community. For many years, CILs have worked with limited resources, to move persons with disabilities out of nursing homes and other institutions back into community-based independent living situations. To address this deficiency, the Home Services Program developed the Community Reintegration Program (CRP), which now awards grants to all 23 CILs in Illinois. These grants provide centers with the necessary resources to offer the start-up essentials (i.e., first month's rent, furniture, cooking equipment, peer support) to help individuals successfully transition back into the community.

Over the life of the CRP, Centers for Independent Living have increased the quality of life for more than 1,930 individuals and saved the state millions of taxpayer dollars. In 2011, there were 124 individuals successfully reintegrated.


Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago (AL)

115 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60607

312-640-2100 (V)
888-253-7003 (TTY)

Serving: City of Chicago

  • AL transitioned 28 people from nursing homes into the community.
  • AL resolved 40 cases of disability fair housing discrimination.
  • AL successfully advocated to secure an additional $200 million in funding for special education in Chicago Public Schools.
  • AL created Women Destined for Success, a program that develops the leadership skills of young women with disabilities.
  • AL helped more than 220 people avoid homelessness through our housing programs.
  • AL, in coalition with the ACLU and Equip for Equality along with pro bono partner SNR Denton, reached a historic settlement agreement in Colbert v. Quinn. Under the agreement, the State will provide housing and related assistance, including personal assistants, to at least 1,100 Cook County nursing home residents with disabilities.
  • AL hosted a "Call to Action" summit with the U.S. Department of Labor initiating a groundbreaking dialogue designed to lead to increased employment opportunities for people with disabilities in the healthcare field.

Advocates for Access (AFA)

4450 N. Prospect Road, Suite C8
Peoria Heights, Illinois 61616

309-682-3500 (V)
309-682-3567 (TTY)

Serving: Fulton, Peoria, Tazewell, Woodford

  • AFA hosted the 2nd Annual Wheelathon at the River Plex in Peoria.
  • AFA hosted a Town Hall meeting with the Deaf Community concerning Video Remote Interpreting at a local hospital.
  • AFA continued to host a local high school classroom of transition age youth 18-22 bi-monthly for Life Skills Training.
  • AFA hosted anger management training in response to a IL Skills Training Needs Survey sent to consumers.
  • AFA hosted Disability Awareness training for Housing Counseling Agencies and Housing Authorities.
  • AFA participated in the community organizing training held by INCIL.
  • AFA continues to be involved in ADA committees for our local transit system as well as the Tri-County Symposium on Transportation to increase transportation options for individuals with disabilities in local communities.
  • AFA presented a Seeds of Change event to the Central Illinois Agency on Aging.
  • AFA assisted four individuals with reintegrating from nursing homes to the community with proper services.

Dupage Center for Independent Living (DCIL)

739 Roosevelt Road, Building 8, Suite 109
Glen Ellyn, Illinois  60137

630-469-2300 (V/TTY)

Serving: Dupage

  • DCIL became a partner with both Illinois Area Agency on Aging as well as Age Options to provide services to the aging population throughout DuPage County by providing presentations and information and referral through use of phone, in person and through an online database. As a result of these collaborations, the Center opened six new active consumers.
  • DCIL hosted a Visually Impaired Awareness Day that included 39 vendors and over 150 participants.
  • DCIL started a new Youth Services Program which has 22 active consumers participating in the program.
  • DCIL Youth Services Program started a Book Club promoting reading, resulting in three young people becoming active consumers.
  • DCIL continues to have a certified SHIP (Senior Healthcare Insurance Provider) on staff to educate consumers about health insurance options.

FITE Center for Independent Living (FITE)

1230 Larking Avenue
Elgin, Illinois 60123

847-695-5818 (V/TTY)

Serving: Kane, Kendall, McHenry

  • FITE added a new peer support group called "Did You Know" for the purpose of consumers receiving and sharing disability resources in the area.
  • FITE is participating in the Illinois Imagines Project, a continued program which focuses on sexual assault and women with disabilities to ensure sure the services they need are accessible and inclusive.

Illinois/Iowa Center for Independent Living (IICIL)

3708 11th Street, PO Box 6156
Rock Island, Illinois 61204-6156

309-793-0090  (V)
309-793-0693 (TTY)

Serving: Henry, Mercer, Rock Island in Illinois, Clinton, Muscatine, Scott in Iowa

  • Over 500 people and 50 community agencies and businesses participated in IICIL's 2nd Senior and Low Vision Fair at the state of the art I-Wireless Convention Center in Moline, Illinois. The event was funded in part by a BBS ARRA grant, and introduced consumers to various community programs and distributed over 300 low tech devices, along various health screenings.
  • The Holiday Carnival for children with disabilities and their families expanded to two days and in December more than 300 children and their families enjoyed gifts, games, a visit with Santa and Ms. Claus and refreshments.
  • The Illinois and Iowa Quad-Cities hosted two ADA events for observance of the landmark civil rights legislation. IICIL hosted an outdoor carnival with food and games for young and old, which included a clown and DJ. The community watched a River Bandits baseball game, information booths by local disability organizations, pre-game interviews with IICIL staff and performances by local talent representing various disabilities.
  • Move seven people from nursing homes to the community and have several consumers preparing for transition to the community.

Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living (IVCIL)

18 Gunia Drive
LaSalle, Illinois 61301-9712

815-224-3126 (V)
815-224-8271 (TTY)

Serving: Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam, Stark

  • IVCIL moved eight individuals from institutional settings into their own apartments/homes.
  • 291 people with disabilities experienced increased access and independence through acquisition of assistive technology/devices such as amplified phones, magnifiers, large print/talking devices or other low vision aids, and mobility equipment such as wheelchairs or walkers.
  • IVCIL conducted disability awareness trainings in which over 340 community members, including over 200 students, increased their awareness of interacting with people with disabilities.
  • IVCIL, through advocacy 30 businesses/service providers, increased compliance with accessibility standards.
  • IVCIL served on transportation committees for Bureau, Putnam, and LaSalle counties to advocate and devise a plan for accessible public transportation resulting in accessible public transportation now available in Bureau and Putnam Counties.
  • Approximately 70 people experienced physical, hearing, visual, and cognitive disabilities through the use of a wheelchair and participation in other disability simulation activities during the IVCIL's Wheel-A-Thon and Disability Awareness Event.

Impact Center for Independent Living (IMPACT)

2735 East Broadway
Alton, Illinois 62002

618-462-1411 (V)
618-474-5308 (TTY)

Serving: Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Bond

  • Impact reintegrated three people through the CRP program by assisting them to move out of nursing homes into apartments and/or homes of their own with appropriate supports, products, services, transitional costs, and environmental modifications. 
  • Impact provided employment internship experiences, through an ARRA grant, to 21 youth workers with disabilities who worked 100 hours and were paid for their experiences. Under the grant, the youth were able to increase their skill level and to build self-esteem. 
  • Impact assisted over 100 people to obtain their medication for no cost or low cost through our pharmaceutical program reducing the paperwork for physicians and their staff who are willing to participate in helping people with disabilities to obtain their medication. Many pharmaceutical companies allow assistance for people with Medicare D when they are in the "donut hole".

Jacksonville Area Center for Independent Living (JACIL)

15 Permac Road
Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

217-245-8371 (V/TTY)

Serving: Mason, Scott, Cass, Morgan

  • JACIL moved one individual out of a nursing home into his own house in a rural community.
  • Yes Eye Can, a series of seminars on living independently with vision disabilities, was presented in two locations.
  • JACIL started a support group for "families experiencing autism "which includes activities for teens with ASD, coordinated by a college student with ASD.
  • JACIL provided six ASL classes with over 75 individuals learning about Deaf culture while learning basic ASL signs.
  • Three pharmacies collaborated with JACIL and began providing services for those who can't read prescription labels through a program called Scrip Talk.
  • JACIL provided disability awareness activities for over 1,000 individuals in a variety of settings throughout the service area.
  • Hosted a legislative candidates forum on disability issues, a collaborative effort of several local disability groups.

Lake County Center for Independent Living (LCCIL)

377 North Seymour Avenue
Mundelein, Illinois 60060

847-949-4440 (V/TTY)

Serving: Lake

  • LCCIL assisted ten consumers who previously resided in a nursing home to transition into their own homes in the community.
  • LCCIL noted a significant increase in consumers served with approximately 25% more consumers served as compared to prior years.
  • LCCIL served 102 consumers in our Employment Readiness programs, 48% of whom obtained employment.
  • LCCIL presented its Youth Leadership program "Catch 'em While They're Young!" at the National Council on Independent Living conference in Washington D.C..
  • LCCIL Youth Leadership Program served more than 80 students from eight area high schools.
  • LCCIL taught self-directed IEP curriculums in two high schools.
  • LCCIL provided Community Organizing training to CILS in state.

Living Independence for Everyone (LIFE)

2201 Eastland Drive, Suite 1
Bloomington, Illinois 61704

309-663-5433 (V)
309-663-0054 (TTY)

Serving: Dewitt, Ford, Livingston, McLean

  • LIFE continues to play a strong role in planning and advocating for accessible rural transportation.
  • LIFE leads statewide efforts to educate hospitals about accessible communication technology.
  • LIFE teaches parents of students with disabilities how to advocate for their children's educational rights. 
  • LIFE staff members served on 33 statewide, regional, county and community boards, planning committees and collaborative action groups, where we advocate for systems change. Staff members served in leadership roles: Chair of the Statewide Independent Living Council, Chair of the Interpreter Licensure Board, member of the Blind Services Planning Council, Chair of a county transportation committee, member and officer of the Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities in Illinois board, member of a local school board, Chair of a county Special Education Cooperative, and Vice Chair of a regional education board.

LINC Center for Independent Living (LINC)

#1 Emerald Terrace, Suite 200
Swansea, Illinois 62226

618-235-9988 (V)
618-235-0451 (TTY)

Serving: St. Clair, Monroe, Randolph

  • LINC performed 15 Accessibility Studies for the communities we serve to ensure accessibility for consumers with disabilities and to educate community businesses and local government of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements.
  • LINC provided transportation assistance to 248 consumers in the areas of systems and individual advocacy as well as through information sharing regarding various transportation options for people with disabilities.
  • LINC presented information at four Policy Academy Trainings reaching over 100 new police officers to increase their knowledge and sensitivity on disability-related issues.
  • LINC staff attended 146 Community Meetings to ensure that the disability perspective and awareness were seriously considered in community planning and decision making.
  • LINC moved one consumer out of the nursing home and into the community and provided information and assistance to other consumers who requested support in transitioning back into their communities.
  • LINC sponsored and participated in Illinois Imagines, a statewide initiative to educate the general public, service providers and offer support to women with disabilities who have been impacted by sexual violence.
  • LINC provided Braille services to community businesses, social services agencies and churches to increase their ability to provide accessible information and communicate effectively with consumers who are blind.

Northwestern Illinois Center for Independent Living (NICIL)

412 Locust Street
Sterling, Illinois 61801

815-625-7860 (V)
815-625-7863 (TTY)

Serving: Carroll, Lee, Ogle, JoDaviess, Whiteside

  • NICIL's personal assistant program implemented online advertising through our website and Facebook to reach additional applicants and/or referrals.
  • NICIL's Independent Living Program initiated organizing throughout Ogle County to implement a peer group.
  • NICIL partnered with other community agencies to provide home modification referrals to 21 persons with disabilities.
  • NICIL hosted our 6th annual Walk-N-Roll disability awareness event with over 50 participants.
  • NICIL's P.E.A.C.E. cross disability peer group has increased its numbers to over 40 members who meet on a monthly basis.
  • NICIL advocated for students with disabilities by participating in over 30 Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings throughout our five-county service area.
  • NICIL's Community Reintegration Program successfully transitioned two people from nursing.

Opportunities for Access (OFACIL)

4206 Williamson Place, Suite 3
Mount Vernon, Illinois 62864

618-244-9212 (V)
618-244-9575 (TTY)

Serving: Clay, Clinton, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jefferson, Marion, Washington, Wayne, White, Edwards, Hamilton, Wabash

  • OFA CIL's Community Reintegration Program moved 14 consumers from nursing homes and advocated with them to regain their freedom.
  • OFA CIL continues to provide a third party service that enables 53 DRS VR customers to obtain quick payment for necessary items to further their education, job search or employment opportunities.
  • OFA CIL continues its successful Social Security (27) and Pharmaceutical Procurement Programs (56) that help people with disabilities stay free of nursing homes and other institutions.
  • OFA CIL secured a DRS BBS grant allowing us to hold five Blind/visual impairment fairs, with helped 54 people to secure items to assist them with everyday life.
  • OFA CIL attended individual education plans (IEP) meeting with students with disabilities and their family to obtain educational rights and/or transition services.

Options Center for Independent Living (OPTIONS)

22 Heritage Drive, Suite 107
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914

815-936-0100 (V)
815-936-0132 (TTY)

Serving: Kankakee, Iroquois

  • Options' advocacy work resulted in 19 consumers being approved for disability benefits and they now have greater access to healthcare and independent living.
  • Options' reintegration efforts resulted in three consumers leaving nursing homes to enjoy living independently in their community.
  • Options' collaboration activities allowed 12 consumers to acquire ramps at their homes, resulting in greater independence and the ability to more fully participate in community life.
  • With technical assistance from Options, 30 businesses and municipalities increased their knowledge on how to improve their accessibility, six businesses removed barriers and improved their accessibility to comply with the ADA and four businesses and 36 polling places were reviewed through our accessibility site surveys.
  • Options filed 16 disability-related complaints with the Illinois State Attorney General's office with six of those being resolved with positive outcomes.
  • As a result of Options' independent living skills training and community education, 17 youth and young adults with disabilities participated in job shadows at 10 businesses. Ten were matched with mentors for job search, attainment and retainment skills with eight gainfully employed.

Persons Assuming Control of their Environment (PACE)

1317 East Florida Avenue #27
Urbana, Illinois  61801

217-344-5433 (V)
217-344-5024 (TTY)

Serving: Champaign, Douglas, Edgar, Piatt, Vermilion

  • Consumer purchased his own home with assistance from the PACE Homeownership program. FY 11 marked the successful completion of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Chicago $39K Grant with which eight consumers with disabilities received down payment and closing costs.
  • The PACE visual impairment program held three low vision fairs and conducted seven support groups for seniors in our five-county service area. A support group was added at the Windsor of Savoy Assisted Living facility.
  • Co-sponsor of the fourth annual Wheelathon fundraiser held at Parkland College in Champaign. PACE welcomed local and state government officials to take part in the race with State Senator Michael Frerichs, Representative Naomi Jakobsson, and Champaign Mayor Don Gerard meeting their PACE constituents and learning more about physical access. Approximately 50 people with and without disabilities participated in the event.
  • Staff attended a train the trainer program of the National Center for Activity and Physical Disabilities, bringing back a curriculum called 14 Weeks to a Healthier You. The curriculum was designed for people who have intellectual disabilities in mind, but can be used on a cross-disability basis as well.

Progress Center for Independent Living (PCIL)

7521 Madison Street
Forest Park, Illinois 60130

708-209-1500 (V)
708-209-1827 (TTY)

Serving: Suburban Chicago

  • PCIL assisted an intern, previously homeless for three years, with obtaining permanent housing.
  • PCIL participated in Illinois Imagines to improve the community response to women with disabilities who have experienced sexual assault and served on three committees in suburban Cook County.
  • PCIL reintegrated four consumers from nursing homes to the community.
  • PCIL hosted 'Take Charge of your Health', a Chronic Disease Self Management program with nine consumers completing the class.
  • PCIL staff members conducted four Disability Awareness Trainings to 59 total customer service staff and management at IlliniCare in Westmont.
  • PCIL staff collaborated with other housing advocacy organizations and local groups to push the village of Oak Park to rezone an abandoned Comcast building into low-income apartments. By the summer, the village approved the rezoning and development plan. A percentage of these units will be made accessible and boost the amount of affordable, accessible, and integrated housing in the area.
  • PCIL's seven interns successfully completed the Employment Program with two interns having obtained full time employment.
  • PCIL used ARRA monies to fund a Vehicle Modification Program for 52 consumers who wished to gain more independence by getting behind the wheel. Consumers were provided monetary assistance to cover costs for rehabilitation, behind the wheel training and adaptive equipment.

Regional Access and Mobilization Project (RAMP)

202 Market Street
Rockford, Illinois 61107

815-968-7567 (V)
815-968-2401 (TTY)

Serving: Boone, Dekalb, Stephenson, Winnebago

  • RAMP assisted 990 people with disabilities to live independently. 
  • RAMP served 196 consumers with Traumatic Brain Injury.
  • RAMP Youth Education Advocates assisted 305 children. 
  • RAMP logged 24,194 Community Service Hours while educating the community.
  • RAMP's four Wheel-A-Thon events raised a total net of $109,016 presented the Teens 'N Transition program (T'NT) to 141 students in their school district. The T'NT program prepares teenage students with disabilities for transition into adulthood reintegrated 10 people back into the community.
  • RAMP's second ever Bad Pants Open, a 9-hole golf scramble, raised a total net of $5,858.
  • The 21st Annual RAMP luncheon featuring keynote speaker, Wendy Posey, raised $13,993 and had 369 members of the community attend.

Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living (SICIL)

2135 West Ramada Lane
Carbondale, Illinois 62901

618-457-3318 (V/TTY)

Serving: Franklin, Jackson, Perry, Williamson, Gallatin, Hardin, Saline

  • A woman who is elderly and blind recently under went a kidney transplant; she was extremely worried with her lack of vision and added health care issues she would need to move to an institution. With the training and equipment she received from the staff of the Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living she is able to monitor her weight, independently monitor her blood pressure, read her glucometer and perform other activities important to her continued health and recovery.
  • A man who has Cerebral Palsy, age 40, and receiving services through the Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living vocational program was placed in the school system as a substitute teacher. Currently, he is in such high demand from the teachers in the school system, he may be asked to take on a regular teaching position when one opens.
  • The Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living recently completed building its new satellite facility. The completion of this building will stabilize occupancy costs and provide a safe and accessible space for SICIL consumers and staff to meet and do business.

Soyland Access for Independent Living (SAIL)

2449 Federal Drive
Decatur, Illinois 62526

217-876-8888 (V/TTY)

Serving: Macon, Moultrie, Shelby, Cumberland, Clark, Coles

  • SAIL hosted a successful ADA Celebration with hands-on disability awareness activities for 164 children from daycare facilities.
  • SAIL conducted workshops for consumers and community members on Emergency Response Preparedness and End of Life Planning in Macon, Moultrie and Shelby counties.
  • Because of the Independent Living Skills training and Assistive Technology provided through the SAIL Visual Service Program, 128 of the 154 consumers receiving visual services were able to continue living in their own homes.
  • SAIL provided pre-clinical training on working with people with disabilities in the medical setting to three groups of student nurses at Richland Community College and Millikin University.
  • SAIL staff participated and provided leadership in four transportation groups in the six-county service area as advocates for improved options for people with disabilities.
  • SAIL staff, board and volunteers provided temporary accessible parking, large print, Braille programs and accessible stage seating at the Decatur Celebration for the 15th year.
  • Five consumers moved to their own homes from nursing homes with assistance from SAIL CRP/MFP staff.

Springfield Center for Independent Living (SCIL)

330 South Grand Avenue West
Springfield, Illinois 62704

217-523-2587 (V)
217-523-4032 (TTY)

Serving: Christian, Logan, Menard, Montgomery, Sangamon

  • A total of four individuals were reintegrated, including an individual who entered the nursing home totally dependent for care and had been a nursing home resident for seven years. Through participation in reintegration services, this individual was provided with the appropriate supports and services necessary for successful independent living. The consumer is now able to perform self-care activities, ride the bus independently and enjoy community outings and overnight visits with a ten-year-old daughter. 
  • The Springfield Disability Vote Committee comprised of SCIL and nine other agencies sponsored a Springfield Mayoral Candidates Forum at the First Presbyterian Church in Springfield where mayoral candidates addressed disability-related issues.
  • Persons with disabilities are able to apply for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) in an accessible space with readily available accommodations due to the cooperative arrangement developed between SCIL and Sangamon County Community Resources. Forty-two consumers applied for LIHEAP at SCIL during October 2010.

Stone-Hayes Center for Independent Living (SHCIL)

39 North Prairie
Galesburg, Illinois 61401

309-344-1306 (V/TTY)

Serving: Henderson, Knox, Warren

  • All four state representatives addressed the SHCIL Class of 2011 Legislative Internship Program and all participants were given opportunities to discuss disability issues.
  • SHCIL consumers appeared on TV to advocate for persons with disabilities.
  • SHCIL consumers participated in graffiti removal in the City of Galesburg.
  • SHCIL's monthly radio program reaches un-served and underserved areas and focuses on all all areas of independent living for persons with disabilities.
  • SHCIL is working with the City of Monmouth regarding ADA accessibility violations of newer construction.
  • SHCIL participates in the Lunch Spot program, coat drive and fan drive.

West Central Illinois Center for Independent Living (WCICIL)

639 York Street, Suite 204
Quincy, Illinois 62301

217-223-0400 (V)
217-223-0475 (TTY)

Serving: Adams, Pike, Brown, Schuyler, Hancock, McDonough

  • WCICIL facilitated and hosted a joint P.A. training between WCICIL and the DHS office in Macomb. This joint training focused on the Independent Living philosophy and the four core services of the CIL, the D.O.N. (Determination of Need) assessment, Consumer management, sexual harassment, abuse neglect and fraud, home safety and sanitation. A registered dietitian from Hy-Vee discussed proper diets as well as different types of diets for people with different needs.
  • WCICIL for the third year conducted CPR Training for Personal Assistance giving our consumers the choice of a more knowledgeable employee.
  • Preparations are underway for WCICIL's second annual Wheelchair Basketball Tournament that continues to educate and bring awareness to participants & general public attending this event.

Will/Grundy Center for Independent Living (WGCIL)

2415 A West Jefferson Street
Joliet, Illinois 60435

815-729-0162 (V)
815-729-2085 (TTY)

Serving: Will, Grundy

  • 22 people with disabilities were reintegrated from nursing homes to their own residences. Several took part in a rally in Springfield to advocate with legislators and ask that the Community Reintegration Program be spared from drastic budget reductions.
  • 16 youth with disabilities took part in the Center's new Youth Leadership Program. This new program teaches high school students with disabilities skills such as budgeting, government, job preparedness, effective communication skills, etc.
  • A man with a disability contacted the Center seeking housing. He was referred to Will County's Neighborhood Stabilization Program. He and his son were able to move into a fully accessible home.
  • The Center secured office space in Morris, making our services more accessible to Grundy County residents with disabilities.

Overall Individual CIL Operational Funding - FY 2011

CIL GRF VII B SSI VR 110 Totals PART C Grant Total
AL $311,999 $0 $83,198 $0 $395,197 $366,973 $762,170
AFA $224,575 $54,577 $22,550 $0 $301,702 $0 $301,702
DCIL $190,002 $0 $51,714 $0 $241,716 $0 $241,716
FITE $262,036 $35,676 $25,799 $0 $323,511 $0 $323,511
IICIL $87,838 $7,176 $40,772 $0 $135,786 $276,101 $411,887
IVCIL $283,010 $0 $0 $0 $283,010 $0 $283,010
IMPACT $306,233 $7,176 $23,063 $104,913 $441,385 $0 $441,385
JACIL $154,144 $0 $11,701 $0 $165,845 $152,371 $318,216
LCCIL $37,352 $7,176 $59,490 $0 $104,018 $259,372 $363,390
LIFE $183,520 $50,525 $51,554 $0 $285,599 $82,804 $368,403
LINC $168,270 $7,176 $65,305 $0 $240,751 $73,615 $314,366
NICIL $222,456 $43,177 $21,330 $0 $286,963 $0 $286,963
OFACIL $422,209 $7,176 $74,538 $0 $503,923 $148,277 $652,200
OPTIONS $98,196 $57,176 $10,250 $0 $165,622 $156,684 $322,306
PACE $201,270 $34,850 $21,054 $0 $257,174 $0 $257,174
PCIL $375,489 $7,176 $32,031 $0 $414,696 $0 $414,696
RAMP $158,466 $45,377 $36,243 $0 $240,086 $238,800 $478,886
SAIL $127,491 $0 $21,323 $0 $148,814 $254,552 $403,366
SCIL $290,594 $0 $33,322 $99,496 $423,412 $0 $423,412
SICIL $156,042 $85,050 $48,407 $0 $289,499 $147,670 $437,169
SHCIL $24,171 $0 $43,325 $0 $67,496 $237,292 $304,788
WCICIL $153,407 $7,176 $5,520 $0 $166,103 $121,050 $287,153
WGCIL $82,030 $7,176 $63,994 $0 $153,200 $255,559 $408,759
TOTAL $4,520,800 $463,816 $846,483 $204,409 $6,035,508 $2,771,120 $8,806,628

Age of Consumers Receiving Direct Services - FY 2011

CIL Under 5 19-May 20-24 25-59 60 & Over Unknown Total
AL 13 62 102 1,046 188 4 1,415
AFA 0 7 9 52 26 0 94
DCIL 1 22 10 70 17 3 123
FITE 3 9 18 71 33 0 134
IICIL 0 10 12 165 143 0 330
IVCIL 2 47 4 49 12 0 114
IMPACT 6 29 29 174 217 0 455
JACIL 1 21 11 48 74 0 155
LCCIL 2 182 23 135 98 0 440
LIFE 0 5 7 83 109 0 204
LINC 2 111 14 103 63 3 296
NICIL 1 90 19 184 60 0 354
OFACIL 8 101 33 393 126 0 661
OPTIONS 1 42 18 138 117 0 316
PACE 1 5 10 155 279 0 450
PCIL 0 9 9 218 640 5 881
RAMP 34 296 41 455 164 0 990
SAIL 0 13 13 253 173 4 456
SCIL 0 16 23 101 31 0 171
SICIL 0 28 86 169 84 0 367
SHCIL 2 30 12 143 33 0 220
WCICIL 5 43 6 152 23 0 229
WGCIL 0 4 19 100 11 0 134
TOTAL 82 1,182 528 4,457 2,721 19 8,989
PERCENT 1% 13% 6% 50% 30% 0% 100%

Direct Service by Major Primary Disability - FY 2011

CIL Cognitive Mental Physical Hearing Visual Multi-Disability Other Total
AL 159 184 972 40 51 0 9 1,415
AFA 14 11 28 12 4 21 4 94
DCIL 17 9 54 4 5 34 0 123
FITE 7 13 72 23 2 17 0 134
IICIL 3 27 62 46 111 81 0 330
IVCIL 12 6 19 3 1 70 3 114
IMPACT 44 29 95 23 198 66 0 455
JACIL 11 8 18 16 68 31 3 155
LCCIL 99 58 31 13 58 181 0 440
LIFE 34 16 27 1 115 4 7 204
LINC 70 52 75 20 11 62 6 296
NICIL 64 20 120 3 6 135 6 354
OFACIL 32 17 50 6 27 527 2 661
OPTIONS 45 22 74 4 93 68 10 316
PACE 9 0 25 47 77 279 13 450
PCIL 18 20 110 666 7 51 9 881
RAMP 238 76 206 22 8 438 2 990
SAIL 11 85 127 16 110 104 3 456
SCIL 36 26 36 5 3 65 0 171
SICIL 123 54 59 19 79 31 2 367
SHCIL 62 16 79 5 5 53 0 220
WCICIL 30 13 71 2 6 105 2 229
WGCIL 23 42 28 3 3 34 1 134
TOTAL 1,161 804 2,438 999 1,048 2,457 82 8,989
PERCENT 13% 9% 27% 11% 12% 27% 1% 100%

Consumers Receiving I & R and Director Services by Gender - FY 2011

CIL I & R Responses Consumers
Served Direct Services
Males
Served Direct Services
Females
Served Direct Services
AL 1,385 1,415 609 806
AFA 6,407 94 36 58
DCIL 913 123 69 54
FITE 1,855 134 69 65
IICIL 12,095 330 132 198
IVCIL 717 114 63 51
IMPACT 2,685 455 186 269
JACIL 806 155 64 91
LCCIL 1,236 440 215 225
LIFE 3,278 204 66 138
LINC 1,829 296 144 152
NICIL 820 354 175 179
OFACIL 1,444 661 329 332
OPTIONS 1,636 316 125 191
PACE 1,555 450 145 305
PCIL 1,185 881 387 494
RAMP 3,616 990 544 446
SAIL 1,189 456 177 279
SCIL 1,317 171 89 82
SICIL 652 367 190 177
SHCIL 259 220 106 114
WCICIL 1,057 229 103 126
WGCIL 2,341 134 76 58
TOTAL 50,277 8,989 4,099 4,890

County Coverage - FY 2011

CIL No. Counties
Served
No. Served
Home County
No. Served
Outlying Counties
Total Percent
Home
Percent
Outlying
AL Chicago 1,402 13 1,415 99% 1%
AFA 4 60 34 94 64% 36%
DCIL 1 115 8 123 93% 7%
FITE 3 111 23 134 83% 17%
IICIL 3 279 51 330 85% 15%
IVCIL 5 71 43 114 62% 38%
IMPACT 6 351 104 455 77% 23%
JACIL 4 112 43 155 72% 28%
LCCIL 1 430 10 440 98% 2%
LIFE 4 131 73 204 64% 36%
LINC 3 255 41 296 86% 14%
NICIL 5 193 161 354 55% 45%
OFACIL 13 150 511 661 23% 77%
OPTIONS 2 224 92 316 71% 29%
PACE 5 272 178 450 60% 40%
PCIL 1 855 26 881 97% 3%
RAMP 4 406 584 990 41% 59%
SAIL 8 317 139 456 70% 30%
SCIL 5 148 23 171 87% 13%
SICIL 7 104 263 367 28% 72%
SHCIL 3 161 59 220 73% 27%
WCICIL 6 115 114 229 50% 50%
WGCIL 2 124 10 134 93% 7%
TOTAL 95 6,386 2,603 8,989 71% 29%

Ethnicity of Consumers Receiving Direct Service - FY 2010

CIL American Indian Asian African American Hispanic Native Hawaiian White Other Total
AL 9 12 1,063 101 2 214 14 1,415
AFA 0 0 20 1 0 73 0 94
DCIL 0 2 14 9 0 97 1 123
FITE 1 3 16 69 0 43 2 134
IICIL 1 1 67 7 0 250 4 330
IVCIL 0 0 0 7 0 107 0 114
IMPACT 1 1 35 3 0 410 5 455
JACIL 1 0 3 1 0 147 3 155
LCCIL 0 5 77 47 0 296 15 440
LIFE 1 0 16 1 0 186 0 204
LINC 0 0 108 5 0 182 1 296
NICIL 1 0 5 25 0 310 13 354
OFACIL 4 4 25 5 0 621 2 661
OPTIONS 0 0 31 2 0 277 6 316
PACE 0 2 54 0 1 391 2 450
PCIL 4 17 199 62 1 595 3 881
RAMP 2 15 175 51 1 733 13 990
SAIL 0 1 93 0 0 359 3 456
SCIL 0 1 35 0 0 130 5 171
SICIL 0 0 49 0 0 318 0 367
SHCIL 1 2 14 3 0 199 1 220
WCICIL 1 0 16 0 0 204 8 229
WGCIL 0 1 34 7 0 90 2 134
TOTAL 27 67 2,149 406 5 6,232 103 8,989
PERCENT 0.30% 0.70% 24% 5% 0% 69% 1% 100%

Overall Consumer Involvement - FY 2010

CIL No. and Percentage of
Persons with Disabilities
on Board of Directors
No. and Percentage of
Persons with Disabilities
on Administrative Staff
No. and Percentage of
Persons with Disabilities
on Program Staff
Number Total Percent Number Total Percent Number Total Percent
AL 19 28 68% 9 14 64% 25 43 58%
AFA 7 11 64% 2 3 67% 3 5 60%
DCIL 9 10 90% 1 2 50% 5 6 83%
FITE 3 3 100% 3 3 100% 2 5 40%
IICIL 8 11 73% 10 11 91% 10 11 91%
IVCIL 5 7 71% 2 2 100% 4 5 80%
IMPACT 7 12 58% 3 3 100% 7 12 58%
JACIL 8 13 62% 2 3 67% 7 8 88%
LCCIL 7 9 78% 4 4 100% 10 12 83%
LIFE 12 16 75% 3 3 100% 6 7 86%
LINC 8 14 57% 2 3 67% 12 14 86%
NICIL 7 10 70% 3 3 100% 6 8 75%
OFACIL 4 5 80% 1 1 100% 6 12 50%
OPTIONS 7 11 64% 2 2 100% 6 9 67%
PACE 11 11 100% 2 2 100% 9 10 90%
PCIL 9 12 75% 3 6 50% 11 13 85%
RAMP 6 11 55% 4 8 50% 11 17 65%
SAIL 7 9 78% 1 1 100% 10 15 67%
SCIL 12 16 75% 3 3 100% 6 8 75%
SICIL 5 5 100% 5 9 56% 13 23 57%
SHCIL 9 11 82% 2 2 100% 7 7 100%
WCICIL 5 7 71% 2 3 67% 3 5 60%
WGCIL 11 18 61% 1 1 100% 6 8 75%
AVERAGE 8 74% 3 84% 8 73%

DHS: Illinois Department of Human Services

401 South Clinton Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607
100 South Grand Avenue, East, Springfield, Illinois 62762
www.dhs.state.il.us

Programs, activities and employment opportunities in the Illinois Department of Human Services are open and accessible to any individual or group without regard to age, sex, race, sexual orientation, disability, ethnic origin or religion. The department is an equal opportunity employer and practices affirmative action and reasonable accommodation programs.