Juvenile Justice - Title II - Reentry Initiative

I. Introduction/Definition

The Juvenile Reentry Initiative pilot projects collaborate and partner with the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission (IJJC) and the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) to develop innovative, effective, and culturally competent youth Reentry strategies, to identify the policy implications of the projects, to provide insight and data supporting these policy implications, and to communicate policy implications to state and local partners, leading to long-term systemic changes in Illinois juvenile aftercare.

The Juvenile Reentry Initiative pilot program provides target services to youth returning to their communities following an IDJJ commitment.

The Illinois Juvenile Court Act permits the commitment of youth over the age of 13 who have been found delinquent, to DJJ. Each year, Illinois courts commit over 1,100 youth to the Department; they are held in one of the state's eight secure juvenile corrections facilities. These youth are at high risk for ongoing criminal justice system involvement, adverse mental health and substance use outcomes, educational failure and employment obstacles. A 2010 report by the Models for Change Initiative noted that the treatment needs of these youth are significant, citing data from the Department indicating that "two thirds of youth committed to their custody have a "diagnosed psychiatric disorder and require mental health treatment while in custody." Without the proper supports in facilities and - more importantly - in their communities, these youth face stark challenges. However, as with all adolescents, these young people have strengths, goals and assets, and are capable of tremendous positive change. With the proper system responses and support, these young people can lead healthy lives and contribute to their communities.

The gaps in Illinois' aftercare system are a significant contributing factor to the high re-incarceration rate: well over half of youth paroled from DJJ facilities will be re-incarcerated within three years. In addition to this unacceptably high re-incarceration rate, post-release youth rarely return to school, receive little to no assistance with employment or training, and are often unemployed. Stable and supportive housing is also a challenge for this population. One recent national survey of homeless youth between the ages of 10-17 found that 46% had been in a correctional facility and of that group, 44% had, upon release, returned to unstable housing.

The current gaps in reentry support for youth leaving DJJ care have significant Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) implications as well. While African American youth comprise approximately 20% of the Illinois population, they comprise over half of the commitments to DJJ. Hispanic youth comprise another 10%. Youth, families, and communities of color, suffer the most because of the State's lack of an effective reentry system for youth leaving DJJ care. Conversely, improvements in reentry care and support could significantly reduce the flow of youth of color back into secure juvenile and adult facilities for technical parole violations and for new offenses. Clearly, providing evidence-based, culturally competent, comprehensive and effective juvenile reentry services is vitally important, not only for the well-being of the youth themselves, but also to enhance public safety and community well-being.

II. Policies & Procedures

Statutes/Rules/Standards

The Provider will administer Reentry Services and agrees to act in accordance with the

Illinois statutes, administrative rules and State agency policies listed below, which are applicable to the provision of services pursuant to this Agreement.

(Source: P.A. 96-853, eff. 12-23-09.)

  1. DHS Fiscal/Administrative Code - 89 Ill. Admin. Code 509
  2. Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, 42 U.S Code 5601
  3. OJJDP Juvenile Justice Title II Guidelines
  4. Delivery of Youth Services Funded by the Department of Human Services - 89 Ill. Admin. Code 310
  5. Administration and Funding of Community Based Services to Youth - 89 Ill. Admin. Code 334
  6. Children and Family Services Act - 20 ILCS 505/17a-4
  7. Department of Human Services Act - 20 ILCS 1305
  8. Illinois Juvenile Court Act - 705 ILCS 405/5-715 (2)(k)
  9. Child Care Act of 1969 - 225 ILCS 10
  10. Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act - 325 ILCS 5/1 et seq.

III. Contract and Amendment Process

Contract Process

The contract between the Department and the Provider is generally referred to as the Agreement and consists of several parts:

  1. Community Service Agreement, containing the standard contract language used for all Department contracts
  2. Exhibit A, containing Scope of Services/Purpose of Grant
  3. Exhibit B, containing Deliverables
  4. Exhibit C, containing Payment Information
  5. Exhibit D, containing Contact Information
  6. Exhibit E, containing Performance Measures
  7. Exhibit F, containing Performance Standards
  8. Exhibit G, containing State Agency Contracts
  9. Attachment E
  10. The Program Manual, attached by reference to the Agreement, contains the program service provisions.

The Department will initiate the contract by having it online for the Provider to obtain and sign. The Provider will fax the signature page to the Department to obtain the Secretary's signature and the Department will return a PDF copy of the executed signature page of the contract to the Provider via email.

Amendment Process

There are two types of amendments to an executed Community Service Agreement.

  1. Letters of increase or decrease:
    A letter is sent to the Provider stating the intent to increase or decrease dollars to specific program services existing in the Community Service Agreement. There is no need for the Provider to sign and return this document.
  2. Formal amendments:
    A two-party signed agreement to an executed Agreement is a formal amendment. The following process is required for a formal amendment to be processed:
    1. Adding new program services - An amendment to add a new program service must contain a detailed summary of services to be provided under the executed Community Services Agreement and a method of payment.
    2. The service dates of the Community Services Agreement* - An amendment to extend the service dates of the Community Services Agreement must contain the following information: -Agreement number as it appears on the original Community Services Agreement; Provider name; clause stating the new term of the Agreement; signatures of the Provider and the Secretary of the Department of Human Services
      *NOTE: A Community Services Agreement end date should be June 30, due to mandates in the State Finance Act regarding audit period. Language on pages one through nine in the Community Services Agreement may not be changed.
    3. Extending the service dates of an existing program attachment - An amendment to extend the date of a specific attachment in the existing Community Services Agreement must contain the following information: -Agreement number as it appears on the original Community Services Agreement; Provider name; clause stating the new term and the specific attachment name and number; signatures of the Provider and the Secretary of the Department of Human Services.
    4. Changing language within an existing program attachment - An amendment to change language in an existing program attachment of the Community Services Agreement must contain the following information: -Agreement number as it appears on the Community Services Agreement; Provider name; clause(s) stating the new language; signatures of the Provider and the Secretary of the Department of Human Services.

IV. Deliverables/Costs/Payments

  1. Payments to the Provider will be made on a prospective basis, rounded to the nearest $100.00. Federally funded programs will be prospectively issued 1/12th of the funded amount and General Revenue (State) funded programs will be prospectively issued 3/12th (3 months) of the funded amount. Subsequent prospective payments will be issued based on previously submitted documented expenditures. The final prospective payment may be greater or lesser than the previous payments due to rounding.
  2. The Department will review documented expenditures, including required match to determine if the expenditures are acceptable. In the event the documented services provided by the Provider do not justify the level of award being provided to the Provider, future payments may be withheld or reduced until such time as the services documentation provided by the Provider equals the amounts previously provided to the Provider. Failure of the Provider to provide timely documentation will result in delayed payments and may result in a reduction to the total award.
  3. The final payment from the Department under this Agreement shall be made upon the Department's determination that all requirements under this Agreement have been completed, which determination shall not be unreasonably withheld. Such final payment will be subject to adjustment after the completion of a review of the Provider's records as provided in the Agreement.

V. Provider Responsibilities

Overview

Providers are expected to collaborate and partner with the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission (IJJC) and the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) to develop innovative, effective, and culturally competent youth reentry strategies, to identify the policy implications of the projects, to provide insight and data supporting these policy implications, and to communicate policy implications to state and local partners, leading to long-term systemic changes in Illinois juvenile aftercare. The provider will demonstrate effective strategies for comprehensive aftercare services; demonstrate effective case management and services working within the existing parole structure.

Providers will engage in:

  • Development and implementation of innovative community-based strategies which result in reduced re-incarceration, reduced rates of re-arrests, increased youth independent functioning, and enhanced educational achievement and vocational success.
  • Collaborative program development and implementation with partner agencies, including IJJC, DJJ and other state and local partners.
  • Development, with IJJC and DJJ, of referral processes and case management strategies.
  • Measurement of immediate, intermediate, and long-term outcomes, with a focus on building capacity to gather and evaluate data.
  • Demonstration of positive outcomes and communication of these results to stakeholders and policy makers, with the goal of expanding comprehensive aftercare services across the state.

Providers must seek to serve all the youth paroled to their proposed geographic service area.

Juvenile reentry programs will:

  1. Reduce new arrests among reentry youth;
  2. Reduce new adjudications, convictions and/or re-incarceration among reentry youth;
  3. Identify and address the mental health and/or substance abuse needs among
    reentry youth; and
  4. Encourage social functioning and independent living among reentry youth.


The aftercare / reentry initiative is an effort to both enhance the resources available to youth leaving the custody of DJJ and to accelerate the state's progress toward policy and practices which can address youth needs, build on youth strengths and successfully reintegrate youth leaving DJJ within their communities.

The Provider will implement an annual Commission-Approved plan to address one or more of the following:

  1. Engage families and support networks for youth leaving DJJ care (may include mentoring, MST, FFT, or other strategies);
  2. Meet supportive, transition and/or therapeutic housing needs of youth (may include Multi-dimensional Treatment Foster Care, transitional group homes, respite housing, or other strategies;
  3. Meet the behavioral health needs of youth, including mental health, substance abuse and trauma (may include individual counseling, group counseling or other service strategies and ideally will involve leveraging Medicaid-funded services, with an emphasis on culturally competent services provided in continuity with those provided in custody);
  4. Improve the educational engagement and outcomes for youth leaving DJJ care (may include educational advocacy, tutoring, or other strategies);
  5. Improve the vocational training and employment opportunities of youth
    (may include vocational and job skills training, job coaching, job placement, or other strategies).

The Results Based Accountability methodology must be used to address the issue of juvenile reentry from the community and program perspective.

The provider must address the four outcomes of the Juvenile Reentry Initiative:

  1. Reduce new arrests among reentry youth;
  2. Reduce re-incarceration among reentry youth;
  3. Identify and address the mental health and/or substance abuse needs among reentry youth; and
  4. Encourage pro-social functioning and stable living arrangements among reentry youth.

The Provider agrees to target and provide Reentry services to youth as described in the approved plan.

The Provider agrees to receive consultation and technical assistance from authorized representatives of the Department of Human Services (Department) and the IJJC.

The program and collaborating partners will be required to be in attendance at site visits.

Programs will be required to attend regular meetings and training as provided by the Department or a subcontractor of the Department, and should budget accordingly.

The program will engage families and support networks for youth leaving DJJ care (may include mentoring, MST, FFT, or other strategies);

Program components will include:

  1. Assessment
  2. Case Planning
  3. Service Leverage
  4. Program Model
  5. Use of Medicaid Funding
  6. Staffing, Stakeholder/Partner Engagement
  7. Performance Measurement

Per the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act, adults working with children and youth under the age of 18 years old are mandated reporters for suspected child abuse and neglect. All programs funded through this grant opportunity must have a written protocol for identifying and reporting suspected incidents of child abuse or neglect.

Background checks are required for all staff and volunteers who have one-on-one contact with children and youth. Funded programs will be required to have a written protocol on file requiring background checks, as well as evidence of their completion.

Goals/Outcomes

The overarching goal of the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission Juvenile Reentry Initiative is to prevent unnecessary re-incarceration of youth and to develop sustainable policy and practice which improve youth outcomes. The outcomes of the Juvenile Reentry Initiative are to:

  1. Reduce new arrests among reentry youth;
  2. Reduce new adjudications, convictions and/or re-incarceration among reentry youth;
  3. Identify and address the mental health and/or substance abuse needs among reentry youth; and
  4. Encourage social functioning and independent living among reentry youth.

Performance Measures

The following Juvenile Reentry Initiative performance measures are required. Providers have set approved targets for each of these measures. In addition, each site was required to set a minimum of two additional site-specific performance measures, relating specifically to the program model being implemented.

Any subsequent revisions to performance measures, target levels, and/or operational definitions must also be approved by the Department and IJJC. Revisions may be requested in the Annual Plan or through a separate written request.

Required Process Measures:

  • Percentage of youth served who will have a reentry plan based upon prior or current assessments.
  • Percentage of reentry plans including goals that encourage pro-social functioning and increase stable living arrangements.
  • Percentage of youth assessed for mental health and/or substance abuse needs
  • Percentage of youth re-assessed for progress.
  • Percentage of youth paroled to applicant's service area served by the project
  • Percentage of youth completing their reentry plan

Required Outcome Measures:

  • Percent reduction in re-arrest rate of youth paroled in provider's service area
  • Percent reduction in re-incarceration rate of youth paroled in the 
    provider's service area
  • Percentage of youth completing their reentry plan

VI. Reporting Requirements

Annual Plan/Budget

Each year, at the direction of the Department and the Commission, the provider will submit an annual plan and budget to the Department. Each plan must demonstrate the capacity and willingness to collaborate with the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission and the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice. Each plan will also include:

  • the target area and population to be served by the proposed Juvenile Reentry Initiative
  • the needs of the target area and population; to present a plan for coordination among existing programs and resources in target communities (including how the program will address existing service gaps)
  • the local capacity to integrate the proposed reentry initiative into a community based system including existing efforts or resources to develop a culturally competent, coordinated reentry system at the community level, such as a governance structure or coordinated system of planning.
  • An overall status of the program to include:
  1. Updated RBA information and charts.
  2. Data on unduplicated numbers served, service provision, etc.
  3. Status on Each required Performance measure, to include the minimum 2 additional program specific measures.
  • Proposed changes to the program model and what necessitated them
  • Service projections - overall numbers served and by service type
  • Proposed budget and narrative.

Quarterly Data & Narrative Reports

Each quarter, due 30 days following the end of each calendar year quarter, the provider will submit a data / narrative status report. All reporting must include totals as well as race/ethnicity subgroup information. This report will present updated RBA information and charts as well as additional updates regarding required performance measures and goals.

Program implementation both requires the Provider to engage in start-up activities and depends upon the cooperation of other system partners (e.g. DJJ and DOC). Therefore, in addition to reporting the number of youth served in the previous quarter, the Provider will also provide the estimated number of youth to be served during the next quarter. The number of youth served must be approved by the Department and IJJC.

Annual OJJDP Performance Measure Reports

Each year Providers will submit Performance Measures data required by OJJDP on or before October 31st of each grant year for the preceding period of October 1 - September 30.

Expenditure Reports

Expenditure documentation shall be submitted, in a format defined by the Division of Family and Community Services, to the Department on a monthly basis, within 15 days after the end of each calendar month.

Cultural Competency

The Provider will exhibit cultural competence when serving youth with special needs, including those who are pregnant and parenting youth (including fathers); youth who are gay, lesbian, transgender or questioning their own sexual orientation; delinquent youth; and youth who are physically, emotionally or developmentally challenged. The Provider will have the capacity to provide services to persons who have Limited English Proficiency (LEP), persons who are hard of hearing or deaf, and persons with low literacy.

The State of Illinois Linguistic and Cultural Competency Guidelines (LCC Guidelines) were developed as a mechanism for improving language and cultural accessibility and sensitivity in State-funded direct human services delivered by human service organizations that receive grants and contracts to serve the residents of the State of Illinois.

Special Conditions

Indirect costs are not allowed under this grant. (These are costs that are not directly attributable to and necessary for the implementation of the program.) Funding allocated under this grant is intended to provide direct services to youth. It is expected that administrative costs will represent a small portion of the overall program budget. Administrative means those activities performed by staff and costs which are supportive of and required for project implementation for which there is no direct client contact such as fiscal staff, audit, clerical support, rent, utilities, insurance, general office equipment etc. Annual program budgets and narratives will detail how all proposed expenditures are directly necessary for program implementation. Any budget deemed to include inappropriate or excessive administrative costs will not be approved.

Subcontractors

  1. Subcontractor Agreement(s) must be for-approved by the Department.
  2. Any subcontractors shall be subject to all provisions of this Agreement.
  3. The Provider shall retain sole responsibility for the performance of the subcontractor.

VII. Department Responsibilities

The Department will respond to the needs of the Provider as required within the full scope of the Agreement. Local Collaboration/Consortium, effective reentry strategies require a commitment and involvement from each of the local stakeholders that impact decision-making.

VIII. Support Services

Utilization of Community Resources It shall be the responsibility of each project director to coordinate the services provided through the project with other sources of care in the community, such as:

  1. Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice
  2. Illinois Department of Children and Family Services
  3. Local probation departments
  4. Office of the States Attorney
  5. Local mental health agencies/boards
  6. Local schools
  7. Local substance abuse providers
  8. Other related social services agencies
  9. Local law enforcement agencies 

IX. Billing Instructions

Providers shall use the following methodology to document the use of these funds:

  1. The Provider shall provide detailed documentation by line item of actual expenditures, including match, incurred for the purchase of goods and services necessary for conducting program activities. These expenditures will be reported in a manner consistent with the approved budget. The Provider shall use generally accepted accounting practices to record expenditures and revenues as outlined in DHS Rule 509, Fiscal Administrative Recordkeeping and Requirements.
  2. Expenditures shall be recorded in the Provider's records in such a manner as to establish an audit trail for future verification of appropriate use of Agreement funds.
  3. Expenditure documentation must be submitted in the format defined by the Division of Family and Community Services. Expenditures must be received by the Department no later than the 15th day of the month following the month of service. Any change in this schedule must be submitted in writing to the Department. Final billings must be received by the 15th day of the month following the end of the Agreement period
  4. The Provider shall submit expenditure documentation by fax or email to the person listed below:
    • Mailing Address
      Tom Evering, Accountant
      100 S Grand, 2nd Floor
      Springfield, IL 62762
      Phone: 217-557-2936
    • Fax: 217-524-2491
    • Email: Tom.Evering@illinois.gov

X. Program Monitoring

The Provider will provide the Department and the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission with requested monitoring and evaluation information and understands that the Department will monitor, audit, and evaluate service and records. Reporting will be as required by the Bureau. Monitoring may include but is not limited to: 

  1. On site visits to providers including inspection of client files, fiscal records, and interviews with program staff and representatives from partner agencies.
  2. Telephone monitoring of service via contacts with providers and a sample of youth and families receiving service. 
  3. At any point, Provider's may be required to address identified programmatic deficiencies to improve the Juvenile Reentry Initiative service delivery system. Failure to address identified programmatic deficiencies may result in a loss or decrease in funding.
  4. A minimum of one staff representative per program grant to attend mandated regional and/or statewide meetings sponsored by the department.
  5. Periodic audits.
  6. Unannounced visits.