Study Sample

The Commission reviewed the 386 files of youth whose parole was revoked between December 1, 2009 and May 31, 2010.

Number of Youth Confined on a Technical Parole Violation

Of the 386 youth whose parole was revoked between December 2009 and May 2010, 54 percent of youth were revoked on a technical violation and 46 percent were revoked on a new arrest/charge.

Percentage of Parole Violation

Percentage of Parole Violation by Type

Description of Percentage of Parole Violation by Type

Parole Violation Percent
New Charge 46%
Technical Violation 54%

Length of Time on Parole Prior to Revocation

  • The average length of time a youth spent on parole was 8 months.
  • The average length for 15 and 16 year olds was 3 months.
  • The average length for 17 and 18 year olds was 7 months.
  • The average length of parole for youth 19 and over was 10 months.F1

Original Commitment Offense

  • Property: 62.4 percent
  • Person: 24.4 percent
  • Drug: 11.9 percent
  • Sex offense: 9.3 percent
  • Weapon: 8.5 percent

Percentage of Youth Committing Offense

Percentage of Youth Committing Offense Column

Offense Percentage
of Youth
Property 62.4
Person 24.4
Drug 11.9
Sex Offense 9.3
Weapon 8.5

Youth Age, Race2 and Gender

  • The average age of youth at original admission was 16.
  • The average age at revocation was 18.
  • 58.9 percent of the youth were Black or African American.
  • 30.9 percent of the youth were White (Caucasian).
  • 9.9 percent of the youth were Latino.
  • 89.6 percent of the youth were male.
  • 10.4 percent of the youth were female.

County in which Committing Offense Occurred

Illinois Courts and the Department of Juvenile Justice track offenses by county rather than zip code. Of Illinois's 102 counties, 56 had at least one revocation during the study period.

County Count Percent
Cook 116 (30.1%)
Winnebago 21 (5.4%)
Peoria 18 (4.7%)
Vermilion 18 (4.7%)
Rock Island 17 (4.4%)
Kankakee 15 (3.9%)
Macon 15 (3.9%)
Madison 15 (3.9%)
Kane 13 (3.4%)
Sangamon 10 (2.6%)
McLean 8 (2.1%)
Stephenson 6 (1.6%)
Tazewell 6 (1.6%)
Will 6 (1.6%)
Champaign 5 (1.3%)
St. Clair 5 (1.3%)
Livingston 5 (1.3%)
Christian 4 (1.0%)
Marion 4 (1.0%)
Adams 3 (.8%)
Alexander 3 (.8%)
DuPage 3 (.8%)
Edgar 3 (.8%)
Macoupin 3 (.8%)
Montgomery 3 (.8%)
Saline 3 (.8%)
Williamson 3 (.8%)
Boone 2 (.5%)
Fayette 2 (.5%)
Franklin 2 (.5%)
Iroquois 2 (.5%)
Jackson 2 (.5%)
Johnson 2 (.5%)
Lake 2 (.5%)
LaSalle 2 (.5%)
Logan 2 (.5%)
Randolph 2 (.5%)
Richland 2 (.5%)
Effingham 1 (.3%)
Bureau 1 (.3%)
Cass 1 (.3%)
Clark 1 (.3%)
Clinton 1 (.3%)
Crawford 1 (.3%)
Douglas 1 (.3%)
Fulton 1 (.3%)
Gallatin 1 (.3%)
Hamilton 1 (.3%)
Jefferson 1 (.3%)
Lawrence 1 (.3%)
Lee 1 (.3%)
Ogle 1 (.3%)
Perry 1 (.3%)
Washington 1 (.3%)
White 1 (.3%)
Woodford 1 (.3%)

Footers

  1. There were no statistically significant differences in average length of parole prior to revocation for gender or race.

    Return to reference 1

  2. See "Models For Change, Guidelines For Collecting And Recording The Race And Ethnicity Of Youth In Illinois' Juvenile Justice System" 7-14 (2008) (recommending a data collection system based on best practices to ensure accurate coding of the race and ethnicity of youths in the Illinois juvenile justice system). The Department of Juvenile Justice combines race and ethnicity into one singular designation, with only four identifying categories. Biracial and Hispanic youth may be undercounted or miscategorized. One youth did identify as Black Pakistani, representing .003 percent of the youth studied during the reporting period.

    Return to reference 2