To: The Honorable Pat Quinn, Governor and Members of the General Assembly

tIt is my pleasure to submit to you the Illinois Department of Human Services Fiscal Year 2008 Report on Illinois Child Care.

Child Care is essential for families transitioning from welfare to work, as well as those of low income striving to achieve and maintain self-sufficiency. Appropriations by the Illinois General Assembly allow the Department to ensure that parents of low income have the supportive systems needed to gain and maintain employment. Funds support access to a variety of child care settings and impact the quality of services provided to Illinois children. In Fiscal Year 2008, the DHS Child Care Assistance Program supported an average of 172,300 children from 91,100 families every month.

With your support, the Department will continue to serve Illinois children and families.

Sincerely,

Carol L. Adams. Ph.D.
Secretary


INTRODUCTION

As required by State 20 ILCS 505/5.15, the Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS) annually submits a report to the Governor and to the Illinois General Assembly on the status of the Bureau of Child Care and Development Child Care Assistance Program. The 2008 Report on Illinois Child Care includes program information for Fiscal Year 2008 (July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008). Information about DHS programs impacting the quality of child care is provided also. The data used in this report are from: a) the DHS Child Care Tracking System database for the Child Care Assistance Program; and b) the Illinois Network of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies aggregate databases of local Child Care Resource and Referral parent customers and child care providers. The report traces trends in family needs for child care and the system's capacity to respond to that need.

The report highlights the devotion of the people committed to the ideal of affordable, quality child care for all children. Further, DHS hopes this report is beneficial to the Governor, members of the Illinois General Assembly, and the residents of the State. DHS thanks the thousands of center-based agency staff, family home practitioners, and Child Care Resource and Referral staff for their support in the care and education of Illinois children.

MISSION

The Bureau of Child Care and Development mission is: To provide families of low income with access to affordable, quality child care options that allow them to pursue self-sufficiency and contribute to the healthy development of children, and to enhance the quality, affordability, and supply of child care available to families.

CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Overview

The Bureau of Child Care and Development is responsible for administrating and reporting on the federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) for the State of Illinois. This program is designed to provide families of low income access to affordable, quality child care. In turn, it allows families to gain and maintain employment and supports independence from public assistance. CCDF guidelines extend state agencies flexibility in developing child care programs and policies that best fit the needs of families. However, states must promote parent choice, make child care consumer education available, and provide quality supports for the child care workforce.

In Illinois, the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) provides child care for children ages six weeks through 13 years and for children with special needs who are 13 through 19 years of age. Families must be income eligible and either employed or in approved education/training programs. Teen parents pursuing high school diplomas or equivalent can also receive assistance. Caretaker relatives, known as Representative Payees (RPY), who are employed are eligible to receive child care assistance. CCAP income eligibility levels were based on family size and Federal Poverty Level (FPL) in FY 2008.

All eligible families applying for the CCAP received services and no waiting lists were instituted in FY 2008.

Goals

The CCAP has two primary goals:

  1. To support qualifying families of low income by providing child care subsidies. This allows parents to maintain employment or further their education, thereby decreasing dependence on public assistance.
  2. To allow families access to multiple options for affordable, quality child care, early education, and after school programs that offer children the opportunity to grow, learn and be cared for in safe, nurturing settings that are culturally and developmentally appropriate.

Administration

Contract Child Care Site Providers:

DHS contracted with 52 agencies in Fiscal Year 2008, including the City of Chicago Department of Children and Youth Services, to supply site administrated CCAP services. These fee-for-service contracts served over 14,000 children throughout the state ages six weeks to 13 years whose families qualified for CCAP. Site administered child care programs provided slots for children of low income in licensed center-based and licensed home settings, determined family eligibility for CCAP, calculated family co-payments and performed other administrative duties. Site administered programs submitted payment information to DHS for processing. See Appendix D for a list of the Site Administered Child Care Providers.

Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies:

In Fiscal Year 2008, DHS contracted with 16 Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) agencies that were responsible for determining customer eligibility for CCAP and approving payments to child care providers, both center-based and family homes. This included supplying CCAP information to families and providers, processing CCAP applications, determining eligibility and co-payment amounts, and processing provider payments. See Appendix C for a list of the CCRR agencies.

Migrant Seasonal Head Start Program:

Migrant and Seasonal Head Start is a comprehensive program serving migrant and seasonal farm workers, at or below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), and their children. DHS contracts with five agencies statewide to meet the needs of these families, many of whom are not aware of available services and speak little or no English. Seven child care centers are contracted to provide full-day Head Start classes for 470 children ages six weeks to six years, parent involvement and health and nutrition services.

Reporting

Data included in this section and the next chapter is from the DHS Child Care Tracking System (CCTS). The CCTS captures an extensive amount of CCAP data including the number of providers paid by type of care, the number of children enrolled, the ages of children being served, family co-payment amounts and participant demographic information. Data from the CCTS is used to submit monthly reports required by the federal government. Also it is used by DHS and its contractors to assess program progress, trends and areas in need of improvement.

Table 1: Fiscal Year 2008 CCAP Enrollment
Unduplicated Number Monthly Average
Total Families Enrolled 156,703 91,000
Total Children Enrolled 282,418 172,300

Prior to September 2007, the family income eligibility was based on 50% of the State Median Income (SMI) for each family size. Effective September 2007, income guidelines were based 185% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). Income guidelines were increased to 200% of FPL, effective April 1, 2008. Chart A, below, compares the annual income eligibility by family size by the three sets of income guidelines used in FY08.

Chart A: Annual Income Guidelines by Family Size
Fiscal
Year
Family
Size of 2
Family
Size of 3
Family
Size of 4
Family
Size of 5
Family
Size of 6
Family
Size of 7
Family
Size of 8
2003 $17,663 $21,819 $25,975 $30,131 $34,288 $35,067 $35,846
2004
(after 9/1)
$22,620 $27,936 $33,264 $38,580 $43,896 $44,892 $45,900
2005 $23,520 $29,052 $34,584 $40,128 $45,660 $46,692 $47,736
2006 & 2007 $24,612 $30,396 $36,192 $41,976 $47,772 $48,852 $49,944
2008 (9/1) $25,332 $31,776 $38,208 $44,652 $51,084 $57,528 $63,960
2008 (4/1) $28,008 $35,208 $42,408 $49,608 $56,808 $64,008 $71,208

Chart B illustrates the number of CCAP families by percentage of FPL for the month of March 2008. Although Chart B contains information for all families, Table 2 is provided as a reference and provides information regarding actual income levels for a family of three at various FPL percentages.

Chart B: Number of FY08 CCAP Families by Percentage of Federal Poverty Level (FPL)
Percentage
of FPL
Number
of Families
10% 3,043
20% 564
30% 1,944
40% 1,992
50% 3,034
60% 4,367
70% 5,542
80% 6,399
90% 6,910
100% 6,750
110% 6,562
120% 6,538
130% 5,696
140% 5,149
150% 4,577
160% 3,871
170% 3,346
180% 2,578
190% 219
200% 76
Greater than 200% 449
Table 2: Income Eligibility Guidelines for a Family of Three in March 2008
Percentage of FPL Annual Income for a Family of 3
100% $14,004
120% $26,808
140% $19,608
185% $25,908
200% $28,008

Families can apply for CCAP at their local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) agency (Appendix C) or at contracted child care site providers (Appendix D). Eligible families are required to share in the cost of care by making a co-payment directly to the provider. Co-payments are based on income, family size, number of children in care, and the number of hours they are in care. Chart C illustrates the number of families at a variety of co-payment levels for March 2008.

Chart C: Number of Families by Monthly Co-payment Amount for March 2008
Co-Payment Amount
for March 2008
Number of Families
Greater than $200 10,384
$101-$200 24,446
$51-$100 25,351
$26-$50 11,771
$1-$25 9,282
$0 1,366

Funding

The Illinois child care program is funded by: Child Care Development Fund (CCDF), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Block Grant, Title XX Social Services Block Grant and state dollars. State spending includes a mandatory amount required by the federal government, CCDF Maintenance of Effort (MOE), and state matching dollars. Illinois takes full advantage of the federal CCDF, including the investment of more general revenue funds (state dollars) than required by the federal government. Chart D provides a breakdown of child care funding.

Chart D: Fiscal Year 2008 Child Care Funding Sources by Type

Type Amount Percent
Title XX $1,200,000 Less than 1%
TANF $168,034,659 21.7%
CCDF $205,458,675 26.5%
State GRF $401,468,910 51.9%

In State Fiscal Year 2008, DHS spent $730 million on employment-related child care programs. $634 million of this amount was expended on child care assistance, helping an average of 91,100 families with 172,300 children afford child care each month. An additional $2.8 million allowed an average 487 Migrant children to attend child care programs during the five month Migrant program. $45 million was spent on Quality services that support child care (See Quality Program Activities, page 12). Special Projects were funded at $15.6 million. Other spending included: $25 million for non-direct services of CCAP, such as payments to contractors for CCAP eligibility determination and $7.1 million for administration costs.

Participants and Services

The CCAP is available to all Illinois families that qualify. Parents participating in the CCAP vary by ethnicity, age, marital status, education level, and number of children in care. Children enrolled in the CCAP are also diverse. The following charts and tables contain information and data regarding CCAP participants.

Profile of CCAP Participants in March 2008

Families:

  • Average family size = 3.3
  • 91.0% had employed parents or guardians
  • 95.7% were headed by single parents
  • 51.7% were at or below the federal poverty threshold
    (Federal Poverty Threshold for a family of 4 = $21,204)

Children:

  • 1.8 children per family on average were served
  • 60.3% enrolled in the CCAP were African American
  • 16.1% were Hispanic/Latino
  • 54.7% were served in licensed care
  • School-age (ages 6 and older) constitute 40.9 of all children served

Expenditures:

  • Average monthly amount paid for care was $363/child (subsidy + co-pay)
  • Parents paid 15.8% of the cost and the CCAP funded 84.2%
  • 99.3% of families were responsible for co-payments, at an average of 6.5% of income

The CCAP requires that parents be employed or enrolled in approved education and/or training programs in order to be eligible for child care assistance. In March 2008, 91% of the parents on CCAP were employed.

Chart E shows the average monthly number of children by fiscal year.

Chart E: Average Monthly Number of Children in the CCAP by Fiscal Year
Fiscal
Year
Number of
Children
2004 192,000
2005 197,700
2006 192,500
2007 177,400
2008 172,300

The CCAP allows families the choice to select the type of child care provider that meets their needs. Parents can enroll their children in licensed child care centers, licensed family child care homes and group homes, as well as license-exempt centers and family child care settings. License-exempt family child care includes care provided by relatives and friends. On the following pages, Tables 5 and 7 provide information regarding the number of children in the CCAP by age and type of provider. Tables 6 and 8 display the average cost of care statewide by age and type of care.

Table 4: FY08 CCAP Provider Statistics: Number of Providers Receiving CCAP by Type of Care
Type of Care Number of Providers
Receiving CCAP Payments
Licensed Centers 2,714
Licensed Family Homes 8,769
Licensed Group Homes 336
LICENSED TOTAL 11,819
License-Exempt Centers 805
License-Exempt Family Homes
(Non-Relative in Provider's home)
13,373
License-Exempt Family Homes
(Relative in Provider's home)
26,181
License-Exempt Family Homes
(Non-Relative in Child's home)
11,679
License-Exempt Family Homes
(Relative in Child's home)
14,655
LICENSED-EXEMPT TOTAL 66,693
GRAND TOTAL 78,512
Table 5: Number of Children in Full-time Care by Age and Type of Care

(Data from the service month of March 2008)

Age Licensed
Center
License
Exempt Center
Licensed
FCC Home
Licensed
Group Home
License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767) TOTAL
Birth to 14 mos 4,383 73 4,089 190 1,145 2,443 800 1,248 14,371
15 to 24 mos 5,345 52 3,717 211 905 2,022 673 963 13,888
25 to 30 mos 3,787 56 2,158 137 486 1,183 404 553 8,764
31 to 36 mos 4,165 70 1,950 129 510 1,081 381 582 8,868
37 mos to 4 yrs 16,527 850 6,427 401 1,665 3,950 1,633 2,173 33,626
5 yrs 5,401 533 2,301 150 833 1,928 830 1,175 13,151
6 to 12 yrs 2,386 734 7,035 384 4,501 10,805 6,361 7,447 39,653
13 yrs. & older 5 2 86 5 63 188 139 118 606
TOTAL 41,999 2370 27,763 1,607 10,108 23,600 11,221 14,259 132,927

NOTE: Data reported here are duplicative and also only represents the children in full-time care. *Type of care codes for license-exempt family child care providers: 764=Non-relative in the provider's home; 765=Relative in the provider's home; 766=Non-relative in the child's home; 767=Relative in the child's home

Table 6: Average Amount Paid for Full-time Care by Age and Type of Care

(Data for the service month of March 2008 and does NOT include parent co-pay amounts.)

Age Licensed Center License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767) TOTAL
Birth to 14 mos $588 $519 $429 $436 $207 $211 $217 $211 $393
15 to 24 mos $607 $653 $451 $465 $211 $216 $222 $224 $435
25 to 30 mos $523 $567 $429 $428 $223 $219 $227 $224 $408
31 to 36 mos $528 $559 $433 $456 $213 $216 $230 $221 $417
37 mos to 4 yrs $432 $441 $406 $426 $216 $221 $227 $222 $368
5 yrs $451 $439 $406 $422 $220 $222 $230 $221 $359
6 to 12 yrs $418 $426 $409 $411 $223 $226 $234 $228 $278
13 yrs & older $548 $247 $439 $123 $228 $235 $228 $238 $264
TOTAL $490 $449 $420 $430 $218 $222 $230 $224 $355

NOTE: These are statewide averages and are not necessarily representative of any one case. Provider reimbursement rates vary by region, type of care and hours a child is in care. (See Appendix E)

Table 7: Number of children in Part-time Care by Age and Type of Care

(Data from the service month of March 2008.)

Age Licensed Center License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767) TOTAL
Birth to 14 mos 180 3 133 21 69 161 58 80 705
15 to 24 mos 217 3 106 8 57 156 28 64 639
25 to 30 mos 155 5 78 3 25 86 19 35 406
31 to 36 mos 150 6 59 2 34 80 32 47 410
37 mos to 4 yrs 775 72 344 39 200 400 142 217 2,189
5 yrs 1,036 398 482 36 146 357 123 196 2,774
6 to 12 yrs 9,680 4,780 4,747 255 1,837 4,044 1,745 2,378 28,315
13 yrs & older 14 18 37 2 18 48 30 41 208
TOTAL 12,207 5,285 5,986 366 2,386 5,332 2,177 3,058 35,646

NOTE: Data reported here are duplicative and also only represents the children in part-time care. *Type of care codes for license-exempt family child care providers: 764=Non-relative in the provider's home; 765=Relative in the provider's home; 766=Non-relative in the child's home; 767=Relative in the child's home

Table 8: Average Amount Paid for Part-time Care by Age and Type of Care

(Data from the service month of March 2008 and does NOT include parent co-pay amounts.)

Age Licensed Center License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767) TOTAL
Birth to 14 mos $233 $215 $177 $240 $90 $93 $95 $85 $148
15 to 24 mos $250 $171 $196 $238 $92 $82 $106 $103 $164
25 to 30 mos $217 $153 $191 $274 $92 $85 $106 $91 $160
31 to 36 mos $213 $275 $182 $190 $98 $92 $104 $88 $153
37 mos to 4 yrs $167 $180 $163 $203 $93 $95 $95 $100 $136
5 yrs $186 $167 $172 $175 $94 $99 $102 $97 $155
6 to 12 yrs $182 $191 $185 $191 $105 $108 $107 $108 $165
13 yrs & older $247 $222 $195 $162 $112 $111 $110 $114 $146
TOTAL $184 $189 $183 $195 $102 $104 $105 $105 $162

NOTE: These are statewide averages and are not necessarily representative of any one case. Provider reimbursement rates vary by region, type of care and hours a child is in care. (See Appendix E)

QUALITY PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

Overview

The CCDF requires at least four percent of federal funds be allocated for the improvement of child care quality (see Funding on page 7). These funds are used to support a variety of services for families, child care practitioners and communities. In Fiscal Year 2008, DHS contracted with the CCRRs to provide parents with consumer education and referrals to child care programs, giving them information necessary to make knowledgeable choices. CCRRs offer technical assistance to communities and employers interested in the development of child care options and supports. Additionally, child care practitioners are supported through technical assistance, professional development opportunities and other resources.

CCRRs are responsible for compiling and maintaining parent customer and child care provider databases. The parent database includes information such as: family size and income, type of child care requested, and hours of care requested. Provider database information includes type of care, licensing status, capacity, hours of operation and fees. CCRRs are also required to record data for quality program services (see the list of services on page 13).

Quality Program Goal

The goal of the Quality Program is to increase the quality of child care available to all Illinois families. The goal is addressed with a multi-faceted approach that works to meet the individual needs of families, child care practitioners and communities.

Administration

In Fiscal Year 2008, DHS contracted with 16 CCRR agencies and the Illinois Network of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (INCCRRA) to implement multiple quality programs. These agencies supply the following services.

CCRRs

Families:

  • Consumer education on legal and quality child care
  • Referrals to child care settings according to family preferences
  • Referrals to the CCAP, other DHS programs, community services

Child Care Programs &Practitioners:

  • Free referrals to families
  • Technical assistance on topics such as: quality child care settings, child development, health and safety, inclusion, business practices and relationships with parents
  • Training opportunities and Professional Development Funds
  • Program Improvement and Accreditation funds
  • Equipment/Facility Improvement grants
  • Resources, such as printed materials and lending library items

Communities:

  • Technical assistance, such as child care supply and demand information
  • Resource development/recruitment of new child care in areas of need
  • Advisement on community and employer options to supply child care

INCCRRA

Families: 

  • Toll-free number that connects parents and providers, in English and Spanish, to local CCRRs
  • Website that educates users about INCCRRA and local CCRRS

Child Care Programs & Practitioners:

  • The Illinois Trainers Network statewide training seminars
  • Gateways to Opportunity: Illinois Professional Development System including: Gateways Credentials, Professional Development Advisors
  • T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® Scholarship Program
  • Great START Wage Supplement Program· Quality Counts: Quality Rating System

Communities: 

  • Compilation of local and aggregate statewide data, including parent and provider database information, as well as other quality program data
  • CCRR staff training and professional development
  • Statewide outreach marketing resources

Reporting

Much of the data contained in the Quality Program sections are from the parent customer and child care provider databases compiled by local CCRRs. Therefore, the data presented does not include all families and children requiring child care services in Illinois. Most families do not receive child care assistance and many families find child care services through friends, family, ads and other means. Additionally, although licensed child care centers and family child care homes in the State are included in the provider database, many license-exempt, especially family homes, are not included. Because of these factors, it is important to note that this report is only one means of examining the larger child care supply and demand picture in Illinois.

FAMILIES

Families of any income level can receive child care referrals and consumer education from CCRRs. In Fiscal Year 2008, 32,640 families received child care referrals for 48,395 children. A statewide sliding fee scale based on CCAP eligibility requirements is used to assess charges for referrals. An annual fee ranging from $0 - $30 is calculated for families and within that time period, multiple referrals may be requested. Parent who are income eligible for the CCAP receive this service free of charge. CCRR staff insure that parents requesting child care referrals are made aware of CCAP. Conversely, those applying for the CCAP are informed about child care referral services.

Families who are income eligible for the CCAP represent the largest set of consumers of child care referrals. In the Fiscal Year 2008, these families were 88% of the total seeking child care referrals.

CHILD CARE PRACTITIONERS

CCRRs support child care providers by referring families to programs. Licensed centers, family child care homes and group homes are listed on the provider database. License-exempt centers and family child care homes may choose to be included on the provider database. Every provider has the option to decline parent referral services. Fiscal Year 2008 provider database numbers are shown in Table 9 below.

Table 9: Fiscal Year 2008 Statewide Child Care Database
Type of Care Number of
Providers
Number of
Spaces
Licensed Family Homes 10,958 94,742
License Exempt Homes 610 1,875
TOTAL FAMILY HOMES 11,568 96,617
Licensed Centers 3,168 227,610
License Exempt Centers 2,413 155.794
TOTAL CENTERS 5,581 383,404

In addition to the provider database remaining steady at over 17,000, the number of providers willing to enroll children whose parents were approved for CCAP also remains steady. In Fiscal Year 2008 as in the previous two years, 70% of providers on the CCRR database were willing to care for children whose parents participate in the CCAP.

CHILD CARE DEMAND

There are two dimensions of the "demand" for child care in any community:

  1. Number of children needing child care compared with the number of child care spaces available to meet the need; and
  2. The unique requirements of families for their specific child care needs, such as child's age, type of care desired, parent schedule, location, special needs of the child and cost.

Table 10 compares types of schedules requested in FY 2008 and the number of providers on the database by schedule offered.

Table 10: FY08 Schedules Requested for Children and Offered by Providers
SCHEDULE
Requested for Children Offered by Family
Child Care Homes
Offered by
Child Care Centers
Offered by Providers
TOTAL
Standard Hours
(A standard schedule is full-time care offered during traditional work hours.)
40,933 10,425 2,871 13,296
Evening 6,854 3,814 84 3,898
Weekend 4,522 1,354 48 1,402
Overnight 1,900 2,790 32 2,822
Rotating 1,625 4,307 726 5,033
Temp/Emergency 364 5,721 691 6,412
Drop In 296 5,059 719 5,778

Note: Multiple schedules may be requested for one child so numbers will not add to the total number of children for whom care was requested. Providers may also offer more than one schedule.

HEAD START STATE COLLABORATION OFFICE (HSSCO)

The Head Start State Collaboration Office is a federal-state partnership funded by the ACF Office of Head Start as the state point of contact for Head Start and collaboration to assist in building early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services for all low income children. Further, its purposes include encouraging widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs, services and initiatives. The HSSCO augments Head Start's capacity to be a partner in State initiatives on behalf of children and families; and facilitates Head Start's involvement in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the Head Start target population. The HSSCO accomplishes these purposes by working with Head Start, state, federal and community stakeholders in the eight federal priority areas of child care, education, health, welfare, community services, disabilities, homeless services, and family literacy. The HSSCO provides education about Head Start, supplies resources and information to support state and local partnerships, and facilitates the development of statewide agreements.

Quality services are available to families and child care providers statewide. CCRRs compile child care provider database information in order to supply referrals to families based on unique needs and preferences. Parents requesting child care referrals receive a listing of potential providers, as well as information regarding legal child care and indicators of quality care. Child care referral services supply listings that are strictly referral, not recommendations for child care.

Child care practitioners are offered a wide variety of programs and supports to help improve the quality of care they provide. CCRRs administer multiple programs aimed at supplying providers with the support and resources necessary to improve program quality. These quality supports

  • Encourage increased professionalism and educational attainment for child care practitioners,
  • Supply required in-service training to maintain Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) licensing, and
  • Offer grants to expand capacity and increase quality in child care programs and settings.

FAMILIES

Table 11 shows dot-point information about families who received child care referrals during Fiscal Year 2008:

Table 11: A dot-point list of FY08 Families Receiving Child Care Referrals
  • 32,640 families received child care referrals
  • 81% of families required care due to employment
  • 1,369 families of children with special needs requested referrals
  • 15,561 requests were made for non-standard schedules (A standard child care schedule is full-time care offered during traditional work hours.)

Table 12 indicates the number of children for whom parents requested care by age and type of care.

Table 12: FY08 Number of Children by Age and Type of Care
Ages of Children Number of Children % of Children
REQUESTS BY AGE
Infants & Toddlers 18, 390 38.0%
Two Year Old Children 5,955 12.3%
Three - Four Year Old Children 12,265 25.3%
Five Year Olds/Kindergarteners 3,046 6.3%
School Age 8,728 18.0%
TOTAL CHILDREN 48,384 100%
REQUESTS BY TYPE OF CARE
(Families may request more than one type of care.)
Child Care Center 46,492 54.0%
Family Child Care Home 38,566 45.0%
In-Home Care 530 1.0%
TOTAL REQUESTS 85,588 100%

CHILD CARE PRACTITIONERS

Child care practitioners care for children in a variety of settings: child care centers, their own homes and in the home of the child. CCRRs offer a variety of services to support the work done by child care practitioners.

Training

One service provided by the CCRRs is training for child care practitioners. CCRRs supply training services based on the results of needs assessments that include input from providers, DHS, DCFS, and other community organizations with in their Service Delivery Area (SDA). Training includes stand-alone workshops and workshop series and self study materials. Topics such as health and safety, child development, nutrition, guidance and discipline, inclusion, and programs assessment are routinely offered. Some are free of charge. Also offered trainings for the newly implemented Quality Counts: Quality Rating System (see page 20).

Professional Development Funds

CCRRS also promote quality by assisting child care practitioners with Professional Development Funds. These monies can be used for college tuition, credentials, and non-CCRR sponsored conference and training expenses.

Program Improvement and Accreditation Funds

Center based and family child care programs are also encouraged to pursue quality improvement. Voluntary participation in the new Quality Rating System (QRS) and/or national program accreditation provides pathways to improve quality. CCRRs offer information about QRS and accreditation processes, technical assistance and support funds.

Equipment/Facility Improvement Grants

Any provider on a CCRR database is eligible to apply for an equipment/facility improvement grant (a.k.a. Quality Counts Grants). This funding is available by a competitive grant process with the goal of increasing capacity and improving quality in child care programs. Awards vary from $100 to $12,000 depending on provider type and program capacity. These grants may be used for materials, equipment and/or facility improvements. Children and providers have benefited from funding supplying such things as:

  • fencing
  • outdoor and indoor play equipment
  • child-sized sinks
  • crib and high chairs
  • adaptive equipment for children with special needs

Seventy-seven percent of the funds expended in FY08 for the Quality Counts Grants were used for equipment and materials for children. The remaining 23 % was used for facility improvement, and parent and professional resources.

DHS has set Infant/Toddler needs as one of the priorities for these grants. In FY08, 38.9 percent of the funds went to meeting needs of infants and toddlers.

Table 13: Fiscal Year 2008 Quality Program Services
Services Number
Training Sessions
(stand alone workshops & workshop series only)
3,082
Training Participants 51,459
Professional Development Fund Grants 3,015
Accreditation Grants 311
Equipment/Facility Improvement Grants 1,308

Teacher Education and Compensation Helps (T.E.A.C.H.) Early Childhood® Program

The T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® Program increases practitioner education levels, provides practitioners compensation and improves the consistency of care for children. The program provides center staff and licensed family child care providers with partial funding for college tuition, credential attainment, travel and release time. Approximately 800 T.E.A.C.H. scholarships were approved in Fiscal Year 2008.

Great START

Great START (Strategies to Attract and Retain Teachers) is a wage supplement program that offers financial incentives to licensed center and family child care home practitioners who have attained education beyond state licensing requirements and who remain employed by the same child care program. Wage supplements are awarded every six months based on the level of formal education an eligible applicant has achieved and continue as long as the practitioner remains employed by the same program. Program data show higher retention rates for Great START participants than the field overall. Data also show increasing attainment of formal education by participants. Nearly 4,900 early care and education practitioners participated in Great START in Fiscal Year 2008.

ACHIEVEMENTS AND OUTCOMES

The DHS Bureau of Child Care and Development, in partnership with the Advisory Council, developed a five-year strategic plan that was adopted in FY03. This plan guides the Bureau with program improvement in relation to available resources. The strategic goals and objectives listed in the plan build on currently offered child care services and include recommendations related to policy, program assessment, service expansion and quality improvements. Five major goals are stated in the plan, each with accompanying strategies and action steps. These five goals are:

  1. Fully implement a child care subsidy system that enables all Illinois families to access quality care.
  2. Support quality child care through a system of adequate base rates and financial incentives for implementing progressively higher quality standards.
  3. Support development of a child care work force dedicated to providing the highest quality of care.
  4. Encourage collaboration and blending of funds to provide the best possible early care and education system.
  5. Implement planning and management tools that increase the system's responsiveness to providers and families, and accountability to the public.

Many of the activities that support the Plan have been outlined in previous chapters of this Report, additional activities are cited below:

GOAL 1. Fully implement a child care subsidy system that enables all Illinois families to access quality care.

Infant/Toddler Incentive Program

The Infant/Toddler Incentive Program is available to child care centers that expand their capacity for infants and toddlers enrolled in the CCAP. These providers can qualify for a 10% add-on to the standard CCAP reimbursement rate. This reimbursement rate cannot exceed the child care rate paid by the general public for children of the same age. The goal of the program is to increase the number of infant/toddler child care spaces available to families of low income. In FY 08, 133 child care programs participated in the initiative.

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultant Project

The Early Childhood Mental Health Consultant (MHC) project addresses the social/emotional needs of young children in child care settings ages birth-five years. A contracted mental health agency oversees the implementation of the project. Full-time mental health consultants (MHC) are employed and housed in a local mental health or social service agency and work in partnership with local CCRR staff. MHCs conduct training, provide consultations and supply referrals for child care providers and the families they serve. The goal of the project is stable and continued enrollment of children with social/emotional challenges in child care settings. Funding made available in Fiscal Year 2008 resulted in state-wide roll out of this program.

TEAM Illinois

The Bureau continues to be a partner in the TEAM Illinois project in Fiscal Year 2008. Involvement included collaborating with other DHS divisions, state and federal agencies, community stakeholders, faith-based organizations and private groups in an effort to strengthen citizens and community sufficiency in TEAM Illinois communities. Bureau staff provided technical assistance and child care information as needed. Collaboration efforts continued in Aurora in the planning of a child care facility. A Request for Proposal was issued for the operation of this child care facility in FY2008.

GOAL 2. Support quality child care through a system of adequate base rates and financial incentives for implementing progressively higher quality standards.

Illinois Quality Counts: Quality Rating System

The new Illinois Quality Counts: Quality Rating System (QRS) was implemented

July 1, 2007. QRS assists Illinois child care programs in providing quality care for children and their families. This voluntary System is available to License-Exempt Family Child Care providers, Licensed Family Child Care providers and Licensed Centers. The System offers levels which providers can achieve depending on the type of care they provide. There is required training that must be attended prior to any provider applying for QRS. In addition, there are basic QRS eligibility requirements specific to the type of child care. Providers must serve children eligible for the DHS Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) in order to participate in QRS. Once a child care provider has met the required criteria for a level, they are awarded a certificate for their achievement and receive a quality add-on rate to the CCAP standard daily reimbursement rate. Technical assistance, training and supports are offered to all types of providers through their local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) agency. In Fiscal Year 2008, 105 providers, serving 4,336 children receiving CCAP assistance, were eligible for QRS.

Child Care Reimbursement Rates

In compliance with SB2900, DHS submitted the Illinois Child Care Rates Report to the Governor's Office in January 2005. The report outlined a comprehensive plan that included the following recommendations: 1) Base reimbursement rates adequate to provide CCAP children access to quality child care; and 2) A tiered reimbursement system that financially rewards child care providers that meet defined benchmarks of higher-quality care.

CCAP standard daily reimbursement rates were increased for family child care home and center providers, on July 1, 2007 and January 1, 2008. The rate sheets can be found in Appendix E.

The third of these recommendations to be realized, Illinois Quality Counts: Quality Rating System (QRS) was implemented on July 1, 2007. QRS assists Illinois child care programs in providing quality care for children and their families, and provides quality add-ons (tiered reimbursement) for CCAP payment. For more information about QRS, see the previous section.

GOAL 3: Support development of a child care work force capable of providing the highest quality of care. 

Professional Development for Child Care Practitioners

In addition to contracted CCRR services (see page 17), the following professional development programs were funded by DHS for child care practitioners in Fiscal Year 2008.

T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood ® Scholarship Program

The TEACH scholarship program increases practitioners education levels, provides practitioner compensation and improves the consistency of care for children. See page 18 for more information about TEACH.

Great START

Great START (Strategies to Attract and Retain Teachers) is a wage supplement program that offers financial incentives to licensed center and family child care home practitioners who have attained education beyond state licensing requirements and who remain employed by the same child care program. For more information about Great START, see page 18.

Illinois Trainers Network

The Illinois Trainers Network (ITN) provides training to individual trainers/facilitators on topics such as developmentally appropriate curriculum, inclusion, and program assessment. ITN trainers/facilitators then in turn, coordinate with CCRRs to supply standardized curriculum training to child care practitioners statewide. In FY08, 570 trainings were conducted for 7582 participants in the following curricula:

  • Child Development Overview
  • Creative Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers
  • Creative Curriculum for Family Child Care
  • Creative Curriculum for Preschool
  • American Red Cross CPR and First Aid
  • Foundations of Family Child Care
  • Pathfinders Second Helping
  • WestEd Infant and Toddler
  • SpecialCare
  • NAFCC Accreditation
  • Early Childhood Developmental Screening
  • Level 1 ECE Credential
  • Illinois Early Learning Standards for Children 3 to 5
  • Introduction to the Environment Rating Scales

Gateways to Opportunity: Illinois Professional Development System

Gateways to Opportunity (Gateways) is a collaborative effort of DHS (child care and Head Start State Collaboration), ISBE, INCCRRA, child care providers, CCRRs, Head Start, two- and four-year colleges and DCFS. The long term goal of Gateways is to improve the stability of the work force for programs/agencies serving children, youth and families through increased pre-service professional preparation and on-going professional development, increased compensation and improved opportunities for career development.

The Career Lattice is a major component of Gateways and is based on six levels of professional knowledge and skill competence. The Lattice also identifies multiple paths for professional growth and advancement for practitioners working with children, youth and families.

Significant accomplishments for Gateways to Opportunity in FY08 are listed below:

  • Level 2-5 of the ECE and Infant Toddler credentials were piloted.
  • The benchmarks for the ECE Level 5 Credential and the Infant Toddler Level 5 Credential were finalized.
  • The number of entitled higher education institutions reached 25, including 16 two-year colleges and nine (9) four-year colleges. Students taking courses from these institutions meet credential requirement through their normal coursework and can qualify for credentials as they complete coursework and/or degrees.

GOAL 4. Encourage collaboration and blending of funds to provide the best possible early care and education system

Good Start, Grow Smart

President Bush's Good Start, Grow Smart initiative emphasizes the importance of children's early learning. The intent of this federal and state partnership is to create linkages between CCDF services and other state, public, and private efforts to strengthen early learning in the state. States are to address the following areas in their Good Start, Grow Smart (GSGS) partnerships: developing and implementing voluntary guidelines on language, literacy, pre-reading and numeracy for children age 3-5 years; supplying professional development supports for child care providers; and coordinating services across the early childhood programs and funding streams.

Illinois' state-federal Good Start, Grow Smart team consists of representatives from the DHS Bureau of Child Care and Development (child care and Head Start collaboration), Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), and Administration of Children & Families. This team again met regularly to share program updates and to discuss and resolve collaboration barriers, both at the local and state levels and sponsored the statewide Collaboration Forums, with the National Child Care Information Center.

Child Care Collaboration Program

The Child Care Collaboration Program was created to facilitate high quality collaborative arrangements between child care and other early care and education providers and funding streams. The Child Care Collaboration Program offers the following three CCAP policy exceptions to approved collaboration providers:

  • Determining eligibility annually, rather than every six months
  • A ninety-day job loss grace period instead of 30 days
  • Continued eligibility as long as participation in the Child Care Collaboration Programs is part of the family's TANF Responsibility Service Plan

The intent of the policy exceptions and the DHS Collaboration Program is to foster integrated services for children and families by bridging some of the differences between Head Start/State Pre-K and child care policy and regulation. Providers are approved in this program by demonstrating the quality their collaboration model contributes to their programming through an application process to DHS.

Illinois Early Childhood Collaborative Web Site

The Illinois Early Childhood Collaborative web site (www.ilearlychildhoodcollab.org) was established to support local collaboration programs with information and resources. The web site contains various resources, presentations, and matrices in various areas of collaboration, including general process and models, written agreements, fiscal and regulatory, and coalition building. It also houses more than thirty real Illinois early childhood collaboration profiles, as well as contact information for users if they have more questions.

Collaboration Forums

Collaboration Forums were held in Fiscal Year 2008 to:

  • Spotlight promising collaboration practices and strategies to continue addressing opportunities and challenges in Illinois early care and education partnerships;
  • Learn more about current successful Illinois community-based coalition strategies and practices;
  • Determine next steps and actions to take away with local team members; and
  • Inform conveners of additional technical assistance needs and issues.

The Forums were held in Springfield and Lisle with a target audience of early care and education program administrators. Early Learning Council Executive Committee members, local community coalitions, CCRR staff, INCCRRA representatives, and training and technical assistance contractors were also invited. Participants were given the opportunity to hear and discuss how collaboration is meeting the needs of families with young children.

Preschool for All

Preschool for All (PFA), administered by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), is a voluntary preschool program for three- and four-year-olds. It builds on the 20-year-old State Pre-K program. Fiscal Year 2008 was the fifth year that child care programs were eligible to respond to ISBE's Request for Proposal (RFP). The CCRRs collaborated with ISBE to promote the availability of the PFA funding and offer other technical assistance to child care providers responding to the RFP.

GOAL 5. Implementing planning and management tools that increase the system's responsiveness to providers and families, and accountability to the public.

Child Care Telephone Billing System

The Child Care Telephone Billing System allows licensed and license-exempt family child care providers to submit their monthly billing certificates for the CCAP over the phone. This system is the first application of speech recognition in a billing application in the state. The goal is to enable providers to control billing for their child care services and receive payments more quickly. The system is available in English and Spanish and allows keypad, as well as voice entry of information. It is available 24 hours per day, seven days a week. On average, 13,157 providers used the telephone billing system each month in FY08.

Child Care Tracking System Updates

The Bureau worked in earnest in FY2008 to compile sufficient information to issue an RFP for a technology upgrade to the Child Care Tracking System (CCTS). Bureau management expect to issue this RFP in FY2009.

APPENDICES

Appendix A

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES FY08 INCOME GUIDELINES FOR THE CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Family
Size
Maximum Gross
Annual Income
2 $28,008
3 $35,208
4 $42,408
5 $49,608
6 $56,808
7 $64,008
8 $71,208

Appendix B

CCAP Enrollment Profiles by County

The following table provides information regarding CCAP participation by county for the State of Illinois. The data being reported is from March 2008. It does not include the Chicago Department of Children and Youth Services site administered child care program.

County # of Families in the CCAP % of Families Statewide Number of Children % of Children Average Monthly Payment per Child % of Working Families % of Famiies with TANF Income % of Single Parent Families % of Children in Licensed Care % of Children with 2 or More Providers % of Children in Care of a Relative
Adams 487 0.6% 820 0.5% $260 86.6% 2.3% 95.8% 70.7% 6.2% 11.1%
Alexander 116 0.1% 257 0.2% $264 76.7% 14.7% 98.3% 19.1% 2.7% 19.1%
Bond 75 75% 116 0.1% $274 81.1% 2.7% 94.6% 62.9% 5.2% 10.3%
Boone 212 0.2% 387 0.2% $371 92.9% 1.9% 96.7% 68.2% 3.6% 8.8%
Brown 6 0.0% 9 0.0% $253 83.3% 0.0% 83.3% 33.3% 0.0% 33.3%
Bureau 92 0.1% 154 0.1% $313 93.4% 2.2% 89.0% 72.7% 0.6% 6.5%
Calhoun 2 0.0% 3 0.0% $369 50.0% 0.0% 100.0% 66.7% 0.0% 33.3%
Carroll 40 0.0% 69 0.0% $237 92.5% 10.0% 97.5% 52.2% 5.8% 20.3%
Cass 36 0.0% 72 0.0% $221 91.4% 2.8% 97.1% 40.3% 4.2% 22.2%
Champaign 1,830 2.1% 3,241 2.1% $342 95.0% 1.3% 95.1% 66.4% 6.2% 11.5%
Christian 90 0.1% 170 0.1% $263 95.5% 2.2% 92.1% 41.8% 8.2% 32.9%
Clark 90 0.1% 159 0.1% $269 89.8% 3.3% 77.3% 79.2% 6.9% 10.1%
Clay 58 0.1% 94 0.1% $242 91.2% 5.2% 94.7% 68.1% 5.3% 13.8%
Clinton 126 0.1% 212 0.1% $299 82.8% 6.3% 92.6% 77.8% 5.2% 5.7%
Coles 297 0.3% 455 0.3% $267 86.1% 1.3% 90.2% 66.8% 3.7% 10.8%
Cook 47,729 55.6% 88.673 56.7% $374 91.9% 5.0% 97.0% 48.2% 2.4% 17.6%
Crawford 82 0.1% 142 0.1% $270 81.0% 1.2% 82.3% 73.2% 1.4% 9.9%
Cumberland 49 0.1% 88 0.1% $247 83.0% 4.1% 87.2% 68.2% 1.1% 23.9%
De Witt 50 0.1% 94 0.1% $291 91.7% 4.0% 91.7% 43.6% 0.0% 35.1%
DeKalb 612 0.7% 922 0.6% $432 83.1% 1.5% 90.3% 81.1% 6.9% 7.3%
Douglas 63 0.1% 121 0.1% $297 95.1% 3.2% 95.1% 47.1% 5.8% 24.8%
DuPage 2,011 2.3% 3,441 2.2% $443 94.0% 1.6% 94.3% 74.8% 2.4% 6.9%
Edgar 74 0.1% 130 0.1% $305 94.6% 2.7% 100.0% 69.2% 5.4% 5.4%
Edwards 13 0.0% 20 0.0% $213 69.2% 0.0% 84.6% 45.0% 0.0% 25.0%
Effingham 161 0.2% 273 0.2% $257 86.9% 1.9% 91.9% 82.1% 4.0% 6.2%
Fayette 84 0.1% 142 0.1% $244 90.4% 2.4% 86.7% 53.5% 2.8% 21.1%
Ford 69 0.1% 114 0.1% $319 89.7% 1.4% 98.5% 78.1% 10.5% 15.8%
Franklin 290 0.3% 502 0.3% $312 83.4% 0.0% 86.2% 69.1% 4.2% 17.1%
Fulton 107 0.1% 174 0.1% $281 80.2% 5.6% 94.3% 61.5% 3.4% 10.9%
Gallatin 19 0.0% 25 0.0% $323 63.2% 0.0% 94.7% 88.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Greene 50 0.1% 84 0.1% $230 90.0% 0.0% 92.0% 64.3% 2.4% 20.2%
Grundy 97 0.1% 150 0.1% $332 91.8% 0.0% 100.0% 70.7% 1.3% 9.3%
Hamilton 26 0.0% 42 0.0% $260 76.9% 0.0% 88.5% 61.9% 2.4% 11.9%
Hancock 38 0.0% 59 0.0% $249 81.1% 0.0% 89.2% 67.8% 3.4% 15.3%
Hardin 18 0.0% 41 0.0% $325 88.9% 0.0% 83.3% 80.5% 4.9% 4.9%
Henderson 14 0.0% 29 0.0% $226 78.6% 0.0% 71.4% 75.9% 0.0% 0.0%
Henry 160 0.2% 257 0.2% $305 82.5% 3.8% 92.5% 66.1% 10.9% 15.6%
Iroquois 125 0.2% 211 0.1% $280 93.5% 1.6% 91.1% 50.2% 0.0% 19.0%
Jackson 426 0.5% 702 0.4% $299 74.3% 4.5% 90.1% 55.7% 4.6% 21.1%
Jasper 34 0.0% 59 0.0% $229 78.8% 2.9% 84.8% 71.2% 0.0% 5.1%
Jefferson 277 0.3% 458 0.3% $262 83.0% 6.5% 94.8% 64.6% 6.6% 10.9%
Jersey 51 0.1% 75 0.0% $252 76.0% 0.0% 94.0% 73.3% 2.7% 9.3%
Jo Daviess 36 0.0% 64 0.0% $298 79.4% 2.8% 94.1% 54.7% 0.0% 15.6%
Johnson 37 0.0% 63 0.0% $280 89.2% 0.0% 91.9% 73.0% 1.6% 9.5%
Kane 1,709 2.0% 3,087 2.0% $392 93.6% 1.8% 95.6% 61.2% 1.4% 12.3%
Kankakee 915 1.1% 1,788 1.1% $340 90.4% 2.6% 97.1% 55.3% 4.8% 15.7%
Kendall 187 0.2% 332 0.2% $416 89.7% 4.8% 95.1% 65.7% 2.7% 8.4%
Knox 267 0.3% 453 0.3% $248 82.7% 2.6% 94.0% 50.6% 8.2% 16.6%
La Salle 246 0.3% 419 0.3% $299 89.8% 1.6% 94.7% 56.6% 3.3% 15.3%
Lake 3,330 3.9% 6,137 3.9% $438 95.7% 1.7% 90.3% 76.6% 3.6% 10.0%
Lawrence 51 0.1% 87 0.1% $270 80.0% 0.0% 82.0% 72.4% 5.7% 4.6%
Lee 117 0.1% 191 0.1% $305 93.0% 8.5% 93.0% 77.0% 3.7% 8.4%
Livingston 101 0.1% 168 0.1% $301 87.1% 1.0% 91.1% 64.3% 6.5% 23.2%
Logan 111 0.1% 179 0.1% $285 92.7% 2.7% 97.3% 48.0% 0.6% 13.4%
Macon 1,111 1.3% 2,038 1.3% $290 96.9% 1.7% 98.1% 50.2% 4.6% 18.8%
Macoupin 140 0.2% 222 0.1% $308 87.0% 1.4% 92.0% 61.7% 3.2% 13.1%
Madison 1,487 1.7% 2,514 1.6% $331 83.0% 5.2% 94.6% 60.3% 4.0% 11.9%
Marion 306 0.4% 545 0.3% $274 81.5% 7.8% 93.7% 70.8% 5.5% 14.9%
Marshall 20 0.0% 35 0.0% $300 90.0% 0.0% 80.0% 65.7% 0.0% 31.4%
Mason 44 0.1% 83 0.1% $273 88.6% 4.5% 97.7% 48.2% 3.6% 16.9%
Massac 61 0.1% 109 0.1% $256 77.0% 0.0% 93.4% 48.6% 5.5% 2.8%
McDonough 126 0.1% 188 0.1% $272 78.6% 3.2% 85.7% 64.9% 4.8% 13.3%
McHenry 685 0.8% 1,093 0.7% $457 92.5% 2.3% 91.9% 84.6% 1.5% 3.6%
McLean 1,072 1.2% 1,766 1.1% $401 87.3% 1.8% 92.3% 72.9% 2.8% 15.3%
Menard 39 0.0% 64 0.0% $287 92.1% 0.0% 86.8% 51.6% 6.3% 20.3%
Mercer 57 0.1% 96 0.1% $302 84.2% 1.8% 80.7% 78.1% 3.1% 10.4%
Monroe 73 0.1% 124 0.1% $435 87.1% 4.1% 88.6% 95.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Montgomery 103 0.1% 157 0.1% $285 87.4% 1.0% 87.4% 66.2% 3.2% 14.6%
Morgan 252 0.3% 481 0.3% $304 91.1% 2.8% 90.2% 69.4% 5.6% 8.7%
Moultrie 71 0.1% 124 0.1% $301 94.2% 2.8% 88.4% 73.4% 0.8% 12.9%
Ogle 306 0.4% 509 0.3% $325 85.9% 1.6% 90.5% 71.7% 4.9% 11.8%
Peoria 1,856 2.2% 3,312 2.2% $346 91.0% 2.9% 96.1% 56.2% 5.2% 16.6%
Perry 101 0.1% 177 0.1% $289 84.2% 3.0% 92.1% 54.8% 4.5% 15.8%
Piatt 41 0.0% 61 0.0% $315 100.0% 4.9% 92.5% 67.2% 4.9% 3.3%
Pike 56 0.1% 97 0.1% $244 85.7% 1.8% 91.1% 69.1% 5.2% 14.4%
Pope 21 0.0% 31 0.0% $309 47.6% 9.5% 85.7% 54.8% 12.9% 9.7%
Pulaski 66 0.1% 139 0.1% $259 83.1% 7.6% 96.9% 37.4% 4.3% 20.9%
Putnam 5 0.0% 7 0.0% $329 100.0% 0.0% 100.0% 57.1% 0.0% 42.9%
Randolph 107 0.1% 204 0.1% $269 90.5% 2.8% 95.6% 43.1% 6.4% 19.6%
Richland 81 0.1% 124 0.1% $272 85.0% 4.9% 83.8% 68.5% 8.9% 15.3%
Rock Island 1,209 1.4% 1,983 1.3% $363 84.6% 2.2% 94.1% 75.2% 13.1% 7.5%
Saline 220 0.3% 396 0.3% $302 83.1% 1.4% 88.1% 68.7% 2.0% 12.1%
Sangamon 1,862 2.2% 3,288 2.1% $338 92.7% 4.1% 94.3% 51.9% 6.1% 15.4%
Schuyler 29 0.0% 49 0.0% $241 75.9% 0.0% 89.7% 69.4% 0.0% 18.4%
Scott 12 0.0% 17 0.0% $312 91.7% 8.3% 91.7% 76.5% 0.0% 0.0%
Shelby 58 0.1% 103 0.1% $219 85.7% 5.2% 82.1% 58.3% 1.9% 21.4%
St. Clair 2,972 3.5% 5,548 3.5% $328 87.5% 6.9% 97.1% 58.7% 4.3% 11.4%
Stark 16 0.0% 21 0.0% $256 62.5% 0.0% 100.0% 57.1% 0.0% 14.3%
Stephenson 316 0.4% 614 0.4% $276 87.1% 5.7% 93.5% 53.1% 4.6% 18.6%
Tazewell 668 0.8% 1,042 0.7% $387 90.6% 2.4% 93.2% 73.8% 2.8% 8.0%
Union 42 0.0% 83 0.1% $222 81.0% 2.4% 90.5% 44.6% 2.4% 25.3%
Vermillion 664 0.8% 1,305 0.8% $267 92.0% 2.1% 95.2% 45.4% 4.4% 22.9%
Wabash 30 0.0% 42 0.0% $262 73.3% 0.0% 93.3% 76.2% 0.0% 7.1%
Warren 68 0.1% 116 0.1% $244 89.7% 2.9% 97.1% 70.7% 2.6% 19.0%
Washington 36 0.0% 55 0.0% $270 77.1% 2.8% 85.7% 60.0% 3.6% 18.2%
Wayne 87 0.1% 125 0.1% $276 73.6% 2.3% 79.3% 80.0% 16.0% 7.2%
White 58 0.1% 84 0.1% $300 70.7% 1.7% 91.4% 78.6% 4.8% 2.4%
Whiteside 273 0.3% 477 0.3% $311 96.2% 3.7% 93.6% 63.9% 2.1% 9.2%
Will 2,417 2.8% 4,449 2.8% $353 90.6% 3.1% 97.3% 55.7% 2.9% 15.2%
Williamson 439 0.5% 738 0.5% $297 80.9% 1.1% 86.4% 66.4% 2.7% 12.5%
Winnebago 2,680 3.1% 5,038 3.2% $340 91.5% 1.4% 96.7% 56.8% 4.0% 15.1%
Woodford 79 0.1% 124 0.1% $370 82.1% 1.3% 100.0% 66.9% 8.1% 12.1%

Appendix C

Child Care Resource and Referral Agency Contact Information

SDA PROGRAM NAME & ADDRESS PHONE PUMBERS COUNTIES SERVED
Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies(INCCRRA)
1226 Towanda Plaza
Bloomington, IL 61701
(877) 20-CHILD
(877) 202-4453
(309) 829-5327
TTY (800) 649-1884
All Counties in Illinois
1 YWCA Child Care Solutions
4990 East State Street
Rockford, IL 61108

REF (815) 484-9442
REF (888) 225-7072

PROV (815) 484-9442

CCAP (800) 872-9780
CCAP (815) 484-9448

TTY (815) 484-9442

Boone, JoDaviess, Stephenson, Winnebago
2

4C:Community Coordinated Child Care CCR&R
155 North 3rd Street, Suite 300
DeKalb, IL 60115

4C: McHenry County
667 Ridgeway Drive
McHenry, IL 60050

REF (815) 758-8149 x 287
REF (800) 848-8727 x287

PROV (815) 758-8149 x286
PROV (800) 848-8727 x286

REF & PROV (815) 344-5510
REF & PROV (866) 347-2277

CCAP (815) 758-8149 x225
CCAP (800) 848-8727 x225

Carroll, Dekalb, Lee, Ogle, Whiteside, McHenry,

Carroll, DeKalb, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Whiteside

3 YWCA Child Care Resource & Referral
YWCA of Lake County
2133 Belvidere
Waukegan, IL 60085

REF & PROV (800) 244-5376
REF & PROV (847) 662-4247

CCAP(847) 662-6129

Lake
4 YWCA Child Care Resource & Referral
739 Roosevelt Road, Bldg. #8,
Suite 210
Glen Ellyn, IL 60137
REF & PROV (630) 790-8137
REF & PROV (630) 790-3030
CCAP (630) 790-8009
TTY (630) 790-8137
Dupage, Kane
5 Child Care Resource & Referral
801 North Larkin, Suite 202
Joliet, IL 60435

REF (815) 741-1179
REF (800) 552-5526

PROV (815) 741-1163

CCAP (815) 741-4622
CCAP (800) 641-4622

Grundy, Kankakee, Kendall, Will
6 Illinois Action for Children
Cook County CCR&R
4753 North Broadway
Suite 1200
Chicago, IL 60640
REF & CCAP (312) 823-1100
FAX (312) 823-1200
Cook
7 Community Child Care Resource & Referral
Community Action of Eastern Iowa
500 East 59th Street
Davenport, IA 52807

REF (563) 324-1302
REF (800) 369-3778

CCAP (563) 324-7844
CCAP (800) 923-7844

Henderson, Henry, Knox, McDonough, Mercer, Rock Island, Warren
8 Child Care Connection
Illinois Central College
5407 N. University
East Peoria, IL 61635-0001

REF (309) 690-7300
REF (800) 421-4371

CCAP (309) 690-7300
CCAP (800) 301-3304

Bureau, Fulton, LaSalle, Marshall, Peoria, Putnam, Stark, Tazewell, Woodford
9 Child Care Resource & Referral Network
207 West Jefferson, Suite 301
Bloomington, IL 61701
REF & CCAP (309) 828-1892
REF & CCAP (800) 437-8256
DeWitt, Ford, Livingston, McLean
10 Child Care Resource Service
University of Illinois
314 Bevier Hall
905 S. Goodwin Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801

REF & CCAP (217) 333-3252
REF & CCAP (800) 325-5516

TTY (217) 244-9660

Champaign, Douglas, Iroquois, Macon, Piatt, Vermillion
11 Child Care Resource & Referral Eastern Illinois University
Klehm Hall, Room 1325
600 Lincoln Avenue
Charleston, IL 61920
REF (217) 581-6698
REF (800) 545-7439
PROV (800) 545-7439
CCAP (217) 581-7081
CCAP (800) 643-1026
Clark, Coles, Cumberland, Edgar, Moultrie, Shelby
12 West Central Child Care Connection
510 Maine Street, Room 610
Quincy, IL 62301
REF & CCAP (217) 222-2550
REF & CCAP (800) 782-7318
Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Greene, Hancock, Jersey, Pike, Schuyler
13 Community Child Care Connection, Inc.
1004 North Milton Avenue
Springfield, IL 62702-4430
REF & CCAP (217) 525-2805
REF & CCAP (800) 676-2805
Christian, Logan, Macoupin, Mason, Menard, Montgomery, Morgan, Sangamon, Scott
14 Children's Home & Aid Child Care Resource & Referral
2133 Johnson Road, Suite 100A
Granite City, IL 62040

REF & PROV (800) 467-9200

REF & PROV (800) 847-6770

Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, St. Clair, Washington
15 Project CHILD - CCR&R
327 Potomac Boulevard
P.O. Box 827
Mt. Vernon, IL 62864
REF & CCAP (800) 362-7257
REF & CCAP (618) 244 2210
Clay, Crawford, Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jefferson, Lawrence, Marion, Richland, Wabash, Wayne
16 Child Care Resource & Referral
John A. Logan College
700 Logan College Road
Carterville, IL 62918
 REF & CCAP (800) 548-5563 Alexander, Franklin, Gallatin, Perry, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Johnson, Massac, Pulaski, Pope, Saline, Union, White, Williamson

Appendix D

Fiscal Year 2008 Contracted Child Care Site Providers

Site Provider Name Address City State Zip Code
People for Child Care, Inc. 610 SW 2nd Street Aurora IL 60507-2636
First Step Day Care Center 1300 Pearl Street Belvidere IL 61008
Bloomington Day Care Center, Inc. 2708 East Lincoln Bloomington IL 61704
Heartland Head Start 206 Still Well, P.O. Box 1585 Bloomington IL 61702-1585
Carole Robertson Center for Learning 2020 West Roosevelt Road Chicago IL 60608-1148
Casa Central, Inc 1343 North Carolina Avenue Chicago IL 60622-2803
Chicago State University 9501 South King Drive-RUC 101 Chicago IL 60628
Chicago Urban Day School 1248 West 69th Chicago IL 60636
Child Services 8765 West Higgins Road, #450 Chicago IL 60631
Children's Home & Aid Society of Illinois 125 South Wacker Drive, Floor 14 Chicago IL 6060-4475
City of Chicago Dept of Children & Youth Services 1615 West Chicago Avenue Chicago IL 60622-5127
Community & Economic Development Assoc/Cook Co 208 South LaSalle, Suite 1900 Chicago IL 60604-1119
Community College District 508 226 West Jackson, Room 912 Chicago IL 60606
Ezzard Charles School P.O. Box 208079, 7946 South Ashland Chicago IL 60620-8079
Fifth City Child Development Institute, Inc. 3411 West 5th Avenue Chicago IL 60624-3239
First Congregational Church 1305 North Hamlin Chicago IL 60651
Hull House Association 1712 South Prairie Chicago IL 60616
Improved Child Care Management Services, Inc. 1130 South Michigan Avenue, Suite 304 Chicago IL 60605
Marillac Social Center 212 South Francisco Avenue Chicago IL 60612-3618
Mary Crane League 2905 North Leavitt Street Chicago IL 60618-8105
Northwestern University Settlement 1400 West Augusta Boulevard Chicago IL 60622-3939
Ounce of Prevention Fund 122 South Michigan Avenue, Suite 2050 Chicago IL 60603-6191
Puerto Rican Cultural Center 2739-41 West Division Street Chicago IL 60622
St. Vincent De Paul Center 2145 North Halsted Chicago IL 60614
YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago 180 North Wabash Avenue, Lobby 3 Chicago IL 60601-3627
Aunt Martha's Youth Service Center, Inc. 233 West Joe Orr Road, North Building Chicago Heights IL 60411
Children's Center of Tazewell County 210 North Thorncrest Drive Creve Coeur IL 61610-3960
Center for Children's Services 702 North Logan Avenue Danville IL 61832-4323
4C: Community Coordinated Child Care 155 North 3rd Street, Suite 300 DeKalb IL 60115-3365
Northwest Suburban Day Care Center 1755 Howard Des Plaines IL 60018
Lessie Bates Davis Neighborhood House 1200 North 13th Street East St Louis IL 62205
East Moline Citizens for Community Center 489 - 27th Street East Moline IL 61244
Child Care Center of Evanston 1840 Asbury Avenue Evanston IL 60201
Child Care Network of Evanston 1416 Lake Street Evanston IL 60201
Kiddie Kollege of Fairfield 2226 Mt. Vernon Road, P.O. Box 362 Fairfield IL 62837
Geneseo Development & Growth, Inc. P.O. Box 172, 541 East North Street Geneseo IL 61524
Human Development Corporation 142 East 154th Street Harvey IL 60426-3326
Highland Park Community Nursery School & Day Care 1850 Green Bay Road Highland Park IL 60035-3110
Tri-Con Child Care Center, Inc. 425 Laurel Avenue Highland Park IL 60035-2652
Educational Day Care Center 330 West Michigan Avenue Jacksonville IL 62650-3223
YWCA of Kankakee 1086 East Court Street Kankakee IL 60901-4255
Kid's Hope United, Inc. P.O. Box 1128 Lake Villa IL 60046-1128
McDonough County Council for Child Development 425 North Prairie Macomb IL 61455-1882
Community Mennonite 3215 West 162nd Street Markham IL 60426-5401
Just Kids Child Care P.O. Box 410 Milan IL 61264
Skip-A-Long Child Care Center, Inc. 4800 - 60th Street Moline IL 61265-8104
Oak Park/River Forest Day Nursery 1139 Randolph Street Oak Park IL 60302-3422
Paxton Day Care Center 200 North Elm Street Paxton IL 60957
Rockford Day Nursery 208 South Rockton Avenue Rockford IL 61102-2256
Thornton Township High School District 205 465 East 170th South Holland IL 60473-3481
Stickney Township 6721 West 40th Street Stickney IL 60402
Streator Child Development Center 405 Chicago Street Streator IL 61364
The Pillars Community Services 8020 W. 87th Street LaGrange IL 60525

Appendix E

Child Care Payment Rates for Child Care Home Providers, effective July 1, 2007

The rates listed below are the maximum rates that the Department will pay per day.

  • For care provided less than 5 hours per day, use part-day rate.
  • For care provided 5 through 12 hours per day, use full-day rate.
  • For care provided more than 12 hours but less than 17 hours in a day, use the full-day rate for the first 12 hours and the part-day rate for the remainder.
  • For care provided from 10 through 24 hours in a day, use the full-day rate for the first 12 hours and the full-day rate for the remainder.

LICENSED DAY CARE HOME OR LICENSED GROUP DAY CARE HOMES (762, 763) effective 7/1/07

GROUP 1A COUNTIES: Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, and McHenry

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
Under Age 2 $25.00 $12.50
Age 2 $24.00 $12.00
Age 3 and Older $22.65 $11.33

GROUP 1B COUNTIES: Boone, Ogle, Whiteside, Champaign, Peoria, Will, Kankakee, Rock Island, Winnebago, Madison, Sangamon, Woodford, McLean, St. Clair, Monroe, and Tazewell

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
Under Age 2 $21.70 $10.85
Age 2 $21.30 $10.65
Age 3 and Older $15.95 $7.98

GROUP 2 COUNTIES: All other counties not listed above

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
Under Age 2 $19.00 $9.50
Age 2 $18.30 $9.15
Age 3 and Older $15.95 $7.98

LICENSE-EXEMPT DAY CARE HOME, NON-RELATIVE IN CHILD'S HOME OR RELATIVE (764, 765, 766, 767) effective 7/1/07

ALL COUNTIES

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
All Children $11.29 $5.65

LICENSED AND LICENSE-EXEMPT DAY CARE CENTER (760, 761) effective 7/1/07

GROUP 1A COUNTIES: Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, and McHenry

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day School-Age Day
Under Age 2 $37.61 $18.81 N/A
Age 2 $32.01 $16.01 N/A
Age 3 and Older $26.20 $13.10 $13.10

GROUP 1B COUNTIES: Boone, Peoria, Winnebago, Champaign, Rock Island, Woodford Kankakee Sangamon, Madison, St. Clair, McLean, Tazewell, Monroe, Whiteside, Ogle, and Will 

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day School-Age Day
Under Age 2 $37.61 $18.81 N/A
Age 2 $29.90 $14.95 N/A
Age 3 and Older $22.06 $11.03 $11.85

GROUP 2 COUNTIES: All other counties not listed above 

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day School-Age Day
Under Age 2 $27.13 $13.57 N/A
Age 2 $23.23 $11.62 N/A
Age 3 and Older $19.06 $9.53 $10.74

Providers cannot charge the State of Illinois rates that exceed the maximum allowed by the State and rates that are higher than those charged by the provider to the general public for similar services. This includes discounts such as multiple child discounts, staff discounts, full-week discounts, pre-pay discounts, and sliding fee scales.

IL444-4343 (R-3-07)

APPENDIX E (continued)

Child Care Payment Rates for Child Care Home Providers, effective January 1, 2008

The rates listed below are the maximum rates that the Department will pay per day.

  • For care provided less than 5 hours per day, use part-day rate.
  • For care provided 5 through 12 hours per day, use full-day rate.
  • For care provided more than 12 hours but less than 17 hours in a day, use the full-day rate for the first 12 hours and the part-day rate for the remainder.
  • For care provided from 10 through 24 hours in a day, use the full-day rate for the first 12 hours and the full-day rate for the remainder.

LICENSED DAY CARE HOME OR LICENSED GROUP DAY CARE HOMES (762, 763) effective 1/1/08

GROUP 1A COUNTIES: Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, and McHenry

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
Under Age 2 $25.83 $12.92
Age 2 $24.86 $12.43
Age 3 and Older $23.30 $11.65

GROUP 1B COUNTIES: Boone, Ogle, Whiteside, Champaign, Peoria, Will, Kankakee, Rock Island, Winnebago, Madison, Sangamon, Woodford, McLean, St. Clair, Monroe, and Tazewell

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
Under Age 2 $22.92 $11.46
Age 2 $21.94 $10.97
Age 3 and Older $20.97 $10.49

GROUP 2 COUNTIES: All other counties not listed above

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
Under Age 2 $20.97 $10.49
Age 2 $20.00 $10.00
Age 3 and Older $19.03 $9.52

LICENSE-EXEMPT DAY CARE HOME, NON-RELATIVE IN CHILD'S HOME OR RELATIVE (764, 765, 766, 767) effective 1/1/08

ALL COUNTIES

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day
All Children $12.37 $6.19

LICENSED AND LICENSE-EXEMPT DAY CARE CENTER (760, 761) effective 1/1/08

GROUP 1A COUNTIES: Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, and McHenry

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day School-Age Day
Under Age 2 $37.61 $18.81 N/A
Age 2 $32.01 $16.01 N/A
Age 3 and Older $26.20 $13.10 $13.10

GROUP 1B COUNTIES: Boone, Peoria, Winnebago, Champaign, Rock Island, Woodford Kankakee Sangamon, Madison, St. Clair, McLean, Tazewell, Monroe, Whiteside, Ogle, and Will 

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day School-Age Day
Under Age 2 $39.27 $19.64 N/A
Age 2 $33.17 $16.59 N/A
Age 3 and Older $27.66 $13.83 $13.83

GROUP 2 COUNTIES: All other counties not listed above 

Age of Child Full-Day Part-Day School-Age Day
Under Age 2 $28.33 $14.17 N/A
Age 2 $24.07 $12.04 N/A
Age 3 and Older $20.12 $10.06 $10.74

Providers cannot charge the State of Illinois rates that exceed the maximum allowed by the State and rates that are higher than those charged by the provider to the general public for similar services. This includes discounts such as multiple child discounts, staff discounts, full-week discounts, pre-pay discounts, and sliding fee scales.

IL444-4343 (R-3-07)