2008 PROGRAM REVIEW AND EVALUATION

SERVICE DESCRIPTIONS

The Division of Community Health and Prevention (DCHP) recognizes Illinois' communities as its most significant partners in preventing conditions that keep children and families from reaching their full potential, and in providing services and supports that build toward truly healthy environments in which children develop and families live and work. The Division is unique in administering over 60 programs that offer an extensive array of integrated services and supports that work not just to reduce and prevent the persistent array of complex health and social issues facing Illinois' families, but also to foster health, family support, positive development, self-sufficiency and success for children, youth and families in need across Illinois.

The Division asserts that the most effective approach for supporting individuals and families across the life span is through a comprehensive system of programs and services that are designed around the needs of individual communities, and that are supported by the communities themselves. Primarily through grants to local community-based organizations, the DCHP provides services in the following general areas:

Reproductive Health

Family planning services provide low-income women of reproductive age with the information and means to exercise personal choice in determining the number and spacing of their children. Reproductive health services also include HIV testing and education; male involvement programming for young African American men; and health education to prevent birth defects and prematurity. 

Infant Mortality Reduction

Utilizing a family case management approach, the Division provides health and social services and supports for pregnant women and infants to help women have healthy babies and to reduce the rates of infant mortality and low birth weight. A wide array of related programs provide intensive services for women and infants whose age, life style, and/or environment put them at higher risk for poor birth outcomes. Other programs work to identify the non-medical factors that contribute to adverse  pregnancy outcomes in the Chicago area; to track children who may require special services; and to develop public health policy in this arena.

Early Childhood Development

Services include developmental evaluations and needed medical, nutritional, psychological and/or social services for children up to the age of three with developmental delays; and the identification and treatment of infants born with hearing loss. The Division also provides screening and treatment for women suffering from postpartum depression; systems coordination for families with young children; and linkage to health care services for families with children in child care and/or with foster children.

Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect

The DCHP helps to strengthen the parent/child relationship and promote positive parenting and  healthy child growth and development through home visits to expectant and new parents who may be at risk for problems in parenting.

Family Nutrition

The WIC program provides health screening, nutrition education, breastfeeding promotion, supplemental foods and linkage to other health services for women and children up to age five who are eligible by income and/or nutritional status. Other services provided by the DCHP include supplemental foods and farmer's market programs for eligible target populations; and diabetes prevention and control services.

Promotion of Child and Adolescent Health

DCHP programs equip school personnel with the skills to improve the health of school-aged children and identify children with asthma and refer them for treatment and services.

Prevention of Teen Pregnancy

The Division works to reduce first-time teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS, and to improve access to health services through a variety of approaches including reproductive health education, parental involvement and public awareness. Other programming targets subsequent pregnancies among teen mothers through home visiting, case management and group meetings.

Support for Teen Parents

The Division operates a variety of programs that provide support and assistance to pregnant or parenting low-income teens to help them obtain a high school diploma (or its equivalent), delay subsequent pregnancies and enhance their parenting skills. Services are also available to the families of these teens to increase family employment rates and education.

Substance Abuse Prevention

Local prevention specialists work with youth and educators in schools, and with community stakeholders, parents and local coalitions, to deliver an array of substance abuse prevention strategies that have been proven effective in addressing local needs. Strategies include youth prevention education, parent education, mentoring, tutoring, communication campaigns and technical assistance in formulating public policy.

Delinquency Prevention

The DCHP provides a continuum of prevention, diversion, intervention and treatment services for youth to support families in crisis, prevent juvenile delinquency, encourage academic achievement and to divert youth at risk of involvement in the child welfare, juvenile justice or correctional systems.

Positive Youth Development

Multi-faceted programs in this area help youth grow into mature and successful adults by promoting positive relationships with peers; emphasizing youths' strengths; providing opportunities to learn healthy behaviors, connecting with caring adults, and empowering youth to assume leadership roles. Services include out-of-school time programs; academic counseling and job readiness activities; life skills education; volunteerism and service learning opportunities; community planning; and preparation for college.

Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention Services

Programming in this area supports comprehensive, community-based services to reduce the incidence of domestic and sexual violence and to ensure that survivors have access to safety, medical care, crisis support, legal advocacy and counseling  services for themselves and their significant others. Other services include education for abusers and assistance with the court system.

Community Empowerment

Team Illinois is an unprecedented initiative that leverages public and private funds to create opportunities for the individuals and families living in some of Illinois' most impoverished communities.

FAMILY IMPACT

The Division of Community Health and Prevention (DCHP) provides a very wide array of services and supports for families in need. The programs administered by the DCHP work in an integrated fashion to address human need across domains and throughout the life span.

Significant among the Division's impact upon Illinois' families are these:

Pregnant Women and Infants

The Family Case Management (FCM) and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) programs work together to help prevent low-birth-weight babies and infant deaths. FCM provides health and social services and supports to low-income families (below 200 percent of the federal poverty level) with a pregnant woman, an infant or a child with a high-risk condition, with a goal of improving birth outcomes and reducing the rates of infant mortality and very low birth weight. FCM conducts outreach activities to inform expectant women and new mothers about available services and then assists them with obtaining prenatal and well child care.

Services are provided statewide through local health departments, federally-qualified health centers and community-based organizations, and include but are not limited to medical care, child care, transportation, housing, food, mental health and substance abuse services. The WIC program, which serves approximately 40 percent of Illinois live births, provides health screening, nutrition education and counseling, breastfeeding support, supplemental foods and referrals to other health services.

The integrated delivery of the WIC and FCM programs is having a significant impact on the state's infant mortality rate and health care expenditures. Nine consecutive annual program evaluations have shown that the health status of infants born to Medicaid-eligible women who participated in both WIC and FCM has been substantially better than that of infants born to Medicaid-eligible women who did not participate in either program. In particular, the rate of premature birth is more than 60 percent lower among participants in both programs. The rate of low birth weight is more than 35 percent lower; the rate of infant mortality is more than 55 percent lower; and health care expenditures during the first year of life are more than 30 percent lower.

Young Children

The Division's Part C Early Intervention (EI) program supports families in promoting their child's optimal development and facilitating their child's participation in family and community activities. The program targets children under three years of age who are experiencing developmental delays in one or more of the following areas: cognitive development; physical  development; speech and language development; psychosocial development; and self-help skills. Services include developmental evaluations and assessments; physical therapy; occupational therapy; speech/language therapy; nutrition services; psychological services; and social work services.

For the past five years, a partnership between the Part C Early Intervention programs in Illinois and Texas has been unique in receiving funds from the federal Department of Education (Office of Special Education Programs) to evaluate the effectiveness of the program on various indicators of family satisfaction and child outcomes. The study provides for a comprehensive survey measuring 21 parameters of family satisfaction to be administered to EI families on an annual basis.

Results of the most recent evaluation (FY 2008) showed that nearly 91 percent of families scored the program significantly high on the extent to which the EI program has helped their family help their child to develop and learn. In addition, over 87 percent of families gave the program high marks for the extent to which the EI program has helped their family to effectively communicate their child's needs. These and other evaluation outcomes provide solid evidence of family satisfaction with the EI program.

Youth

Research demonstrates that non-violent youth are less likely to become further involved in delinquent or criminal behavior if they remain in their home communities and if appropriate services are available that address underlying needs - for example, mental illness, substance abuse, learning disabilities, unstable living arrangements, etc. Redeploy Illinois provides a fiscal incentive to counties that provide services to youth within their home communities by building a continuum of care for youth who are in the juvenile justice system, thereby reducing the county's commitments to the Illinois Department of Corrections. Through Redeploy, counties can link each youth to a wide array of  needed services and supports within his or her home community, including (but not limited to) case management; court advocacy; education assistance; individual, family and/or group counseling; and crisis intervention.

In its first three years of operation, Redeploy Illinois has demonstrated success. Approximately 400 youth residing in the pilot  sites were diverted from commitment to the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice. Compared to the number of commitments occurring in the pilot sites prior to Redeploy Illinois, the reported diversions represented a 51 percent reduction in commitments. Had these youth been committed, it is estimated that the costs to the state of Illinois could have totaled almost $19 million. An analysis of site expenditures compared to these potential cost savings suggests that for every dollar spent by Redeploy Illinois sites, the State saves four.

Although cost savings is an important measure of success, especially for a governmentsupported program, it is secondary to the initiative's effect on the lives of troubled youth.

Redeploy Illinois has been successful in mobilizing communities to direct resources to youth offenders who otherwise would have been detained, or worse, incarcerated. With the advent of Redeploy Illinois, many more youth offenders now have the opportunity to thrive and become productive citizens.

Community Wellbeing

The AmeriCorps program, administered in Illinois by the Division of Community Health and Prevention, is a national service initiative that involves people in ''getting things done'' in communities. AmeriCorps members develop an ethic of service while strengthening local communities. There are 22 AmeriCorps state programs with more than 850 members committed to a year of service. The charge of individual programs is determined by the local needs of the community, with many focusing on education, human services and supports, environmental quality, public health or public safety. Specific services that are provided vary widely, depending on the goals of the individual program; examples include tutoring and mentoring services in after-school settings, prenatal care for pregnant women, operation of food pantries, and work in Head Start programs.

In the past year, Illinois' AmeriCorps members tutored or mentored nearly 10,000 students in grades 1 through 12; counseled nearly 30,000 people related to health and family issues (e.g., mental or physical health); and mobilized nearly 12,500 volunteers in communities across the state.

NEED AND POPULATIONS SERVED

The Division administers over 60 programs that work together to serve Illinois' families every day, all across the state. From infant health to violence prevention, from the quiet home visit to the community forum, these programs partner with communities large and small to support healthy families and build healthy communities.

Community Health and Prevention Service Data

Community Health
?Program SFY08 Actual SFY09 Estimated SFY10 Projected
Target Population
Pregnant Women 228,125 228,000 228,000
Children 0-19 3,574,275 3,574,275 3,574,275
Women of reproductive age 2,685,172 2,685,172 2,685,172
Recipients
Pregnant Women 149,910 148,000 148,000
Children 0-19 1,764,867 1,764,867 1,764,867
Women of reproductive age 131,641 130,000 130,000
Units of Service
Medical (1) 2,629,996 2,600,000 2,600,000
Education, etc (2) 532,753 537,000 542,000
Food packages (3) 12,199,780 12,500,000 12,500,000

(1) Immunization Shots; (2) Nutrition Education Class Participants; (3) Food Instruments

Youth Programs
?Program SFY08 Actual SFY09 Estimated SFY10 Projected
Target Population
Youth aged 6-19 2,507,722 2,507,722 2,507,722
Recipients
Youth served aged 6 to 19 yrs 90,441 67,136 67,136

Performance Measures

?Performance Measures Description SFY08
Actual 
SFY09
Estimated
SFY10
Projected
The rate/1,000 of live births to women 15 to 19 years of age. 37.6 37 37
Percent of WIC mothers that continue to 26% 27% 27%
breastfeed their infants at six months of age.
The percent of African-American women in the WIC program who initiate breastfeeding their newborn infants. 52% 55% 58%
The percent of women that smoke in the last three months of pregnancy. 10% 10% 10%
Percent of Medicaid-eligible pregnant women that are active in FCM and WIC in first trimester. 45.8% 46% 46%
Pregnant women receiving services from WIC and/or FCM as a percent of Medicaid-eligible pregnant women. 89% 90% 90%
The proportion of live births that are intended. 42.5% 42% 41.5%
The rate of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. 7.2 6 4.5
The rate of infant deaths per 1,000 live births among African Americans. 14.4 12 9
The rate of infant deaths per 1,000 live births among Hispanic/Latino's. 6.6 5.5 4.1
The proportion of women and men under 100% FPL served by Family Planning. 75% 75% 75%
The proportion of infants born weighing less than 2,500 grams. 8.6% 7.6% 5%
Percent of children receiving Early Intervention services that are under age 1. 12% 13% 14%
Percent of FCM and/or WIC 19-35 month olds who are fully immunized. 79% 85% 90%
Percent of Illinois children without health 5.9% 5.9% 5.9%
insurance.
The proportion of 10th grade children reporting consumption of alcohol within the past 30 days. 42.6% 40% 38%
Percent of children ages 2-5 receiving WIC services that have a Body Mass Index (BMI) at or above the 85th percentile. 29.9% 29.8% 29.5%
The proportion of women 15 to 24 years of age getting tested for Chlamydia. 59% 59% 60%

STRATEGIC GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS SFY 08

Priority III - Health

Collaborate with human service agencies to improve the health and well-being of individuals and families and provide effective treatment to individuals in need.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 34

Reduce the incidence of infant mortality, especially among African Americans.

Objective(s)
  • By December 31, 2008, maintain births to teenagers 15 to 17 years at a rate of percent.

    Status: The rate of births to 15 to 17 year old women in 2006 was 22.1 per 1,000; a slight increase from the rate reported in 2005 (21.2 per 1,000) and above Illinois' performance target (21 per 1,000). The birth rate among 15 to 17 year olds has declined by 18 percent between 2000 and 2005. The birth rate has declined among all racial and ethnic groups (whites, 13 percent; blacks, 22.7 percent; and Hispanics, 13 percent). These are the most recent data available.

  • By December 31, 2008, increase the percent of WIC mothers who breastfeed their infants at six months of age to 26 percent.

    Status: The percent of WIC participants who continued breastfeeding for six months is 25.7 percent. The proportion of WIC participants who continued breastfeeding for six months more than doubled since 1992 when the six - month breastfeeding rate was 11.4 percent.

  • By December 31, 2008, increase the proportion of African American women who choose to breastfeed their newborn infants to 52 percent.

    Status: In 2008, the proportion of African American women participating in WIC who chose to breastfeed their newborn infants was 50.3 percent.

  • By December 31, 2008, maintain the percent women who smoke in the last three months of pregnancy at a rate of 10 percent or lower.

    Status: According to the 2005 Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) report (the most recent survey available), 10.4 percent smoked in the last three months of pregnancy.

  • By December 31, 2008, maintain the percent of Medicaid eligible pregnant women active in FCM and WIC in the first trimester at a rate of 46 percent.

    Status: The percent of Medicaid eligible pregnant women active in FCM and WIC throughout Fiscal Year 2008, was 48.4.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the rate of unintended pregnancy to a rate of 42.5 percent.

    Status: The most recent data available are from 2005 PRAMS report. That year, 42 percent of pregnancies resulting in live births were unintended.

  • By December 31, 2008, maintain the percent of women receiving services from WIC and/or FCM as a percent of Medicaid eligible pregnant women at a rate of 89 percent.

    Status: The percent of women receiving services from WIC and/or FCM as a percent of Medicaid eligible women throughout Fiscal Year 2008, was 82 percent. The observed decrease is due to disruption of FCM services delivered to Medicaid eligible women in Cook County as a result of the Cook County Public Health Department's decision to discontinue as a Family Case Management Service provider in August 2008.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the rate of infant deaths per 1,000 live births to a rate of 7.2.

    Status: Illinois' infant mortality rate for 2006 (the latest year available) was 7.2 deaths for every 1,000 live births.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the rate of deaths per 1,000 live births among African Americans to a rate of 15.0.

    Status: The infant mortality rate for African-Americans was 14.4 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the rate of deaths per 1,000 live births among Hispanic/Latinos to a rate of 5.78.

    Status: The infant mortality rate for Hispanic/Latinos was 6.6 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2006. Although the objective was not met, the observed increase in the rate is consistent with past fluctuations. Despite that, the Division of Community Health and Prevention will continue to monitor its programming to the Hispanic/Latinos.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the percent of low birth weight infants to 8.6.

    Status: In 2006, the latest year for which data are available, the percent of low birth weight infants was 8.6 percent.

  • By December 31, 2008, maintain the proportion of individuals at or below 100 percent FPL that receive Title X Family Planning services at 75 percent.

    Status: The number of clients served at or below 100 percent Federal Poverty Level during 2007 was 99,048 or 75 percent of the total number served (131,641).

Accomplishment(s)

Indicators of maternal and infant health in Illinois have shown consistent improvement. In 2005 (most recent data available), Illinois ranked 31st among the states and the District of Columbia in infant mortality, which compares favorably with its ranking of 47th in 1980.

Further enhancement of services directed to preventing very low birth-weight such as Targeted and Intensive Prenatal Case Management, Healthy Start and Healthy Births for Healthy Communities holds significant potential for continuing to see improvement in Illinois' overall infant mortality rate.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 35

Improve the health status of children and adolescents.

Objective(s)
  • By December 31, 2008, increase the percent of children receiving Early Intervention service that are under age 1 to 12 percent.

    Status: In 2008, 12 percent of Early Intervention recipients were under the age of 1.

  • By December 31, 2008, increase the percent of 19 to 35 month olds who have received the full schedule of age appropriate immunizations against measles, mumps, rebella, polio, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hemophilus, influenza and Hepatitis B to 79 percent.

    Status: The most current release of the National Immunization Survey (NIS) results in 2007 indicates that the series completion level for Illinois is 78.5 percent.

  • By December 31, 2008, maintain the percentage of children without health insurance at a rate of 5.9 percent.

    Status: Of children enrolled in WIC, 94.1 percent had All Kids or other insurance coverage. FCM providers are required to document giving parent information regarding Illinois' All Kids program and information on how to enroll.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the number of 10th grade children reporting use of alcohol in the past month to 42.6 percent.

    Status: In 2006, the Illinois Youth Survey reported that 42.6 percent of 10th grade children reported consuming alcohol within the past 30 days.

  • By December 31, 2008, decrease the percent children ages 2 to 5 years receiving WIC services that have a Body Mass Index (BMI) at or above the 85th percentile to 29.9 percent.

    Status: In 2007, 29.9 percent of children between 2 and 5 years of age who received WIC services had a BMI score at or above the 85 percentile. Illinois is following the national trend in the epidemic of overweight/obesity. The prevalence of overweight in children (2-5 years of age) in Illinois has gradually increased from 3 percent in 1976 to almost 30 percent in 2007.

  • By December 31, 2008, increase the percent of females age 15-24 receiving services at Title X Family Planning Clinics who received at least one test for Chlamydia to 59 percent.

    Status: The percent of females age 15-24 receiving services at Title X Family Planning Clinics who received at least one test for Chlamydia was 58.8 percent.

Accomplishment(s)

Accomplishments in the health status of children and adolescents are many. Notable among them are accomplishments related to the objectives above and to the general well-being of youth in Illinois.

  • Statewide, WIC children ages 12-18 months achieved immunization coverage of 84.4 percent. Chicago Department of Public Health reported for FY 2007, 88.6 percent of two-yearolds were fully immunized.
  • The proportion of Medicaid-eligible infants that obtain routine well-child care has been steadily improving in Illinois. The proportion has exceeded 90 percent for the last five years and reached 95.5 percent in 2006 (the most recent
  • data available). The high rate of utilization reflects the effort of several programs within the division to ensure that infants obtain appropriate well-child care.
  • The rate of births to 15 to 17 year old women in 2006 was 22.1 per 1,000; a slight increase from the rate reported in 2005 (21.2 per 1,000) and above Illinois' performance target (21 per 1,000). The birth rate among 15 to 17 year olds has declined by 18 percent between 2000 and 2005. The birth rate has declined among all racial and ethnic groups (whites, 13 percent; blacks, 22.7 percent; and Hispanics, 13 percent).
  • The 2006 version of the Illinois Youth Survey reports that the percent of students in 8th, 10th, and 12th grades who had smoked cigarettes decreased to 16 percent from 2002 when the percent was 18.9 percent.
  • In 2007, Illinois reported a decrease in the rate of child maltreatment to 7.6 per 1,000 (the previous rate was 7.8). Many  programs within DCHP work to prevent child maltreatment including Healthy Families Illinois (HFI), Parents Too Soon, Parents Care and Share and the High-Risk Infant Follow-up programs.

Priority VI - Integration

Implement cross-cutting processes that enhance achievement of the agency's core mission and provide seamless integrated services for individuals, families and communities.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 86

Enhance the capacity of the youth services system in Illinois.

Objective(s)
  • By December 31, 2008, reduce Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services (CCBYS) and Unified Delinquency Intervention Services (UDIS) youth assessed to be at high risk of delinquency to 40 percent.

    Status: In 2008, the percent of youth assessed to be at high risk of delinquency was 40 percent.

  • By December 31, 2008, increase CCBYS and UDIS youth whose cases are closed due to family reunification to 77.6 percent.

    Status: In 2008, the percent of youth whose cases are closed due to family reunification was 77.6 percent.

Accomplishment(s)

A major accomplishment in enhancing the capacity of youth services program is Redeploy Illinois. In its first three years of  providing services, Redeploy Illinois has demonstrated success. Approximately, 400 youth residing in the pilot sites (Macon County, Peoria County, St. Clair County, and the 2nd Judicial Circuit) were diverted from commitment to the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice. Compared to the number of commitments occurring in the pilot sites prior to Redeploy Illinois, the reported diversions represented a 51 percent reduction in commitments. Had these youth been committed, it is estimated that the costs to the state of Illinois could have totaled almost $19 million. In FY 2009, Redeploy expanded to include five additional pilot areas: Kankakee County, Lee County, Madison County, McLean County, and the 4th Circuit (Montgomery, Christian, and Marion Counties). These new sites are expected to be funded by January 2009 and after an approximate three month start up period begin service delivery in the spring of 2009.

STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES SFY 09 - 11

Priority III - Health

Collaborate with human service agencies to improve the health and well-being of individuals and families and provide effective treatment to individuals in need.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 34

Reduce the incidence of infant mortality, especially among African Americans.

Objective(s)
  • By July 2010, initiate the Campaign for Responsible Sexual Behavior to reduce unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV.
  • By December 31, 2011, maintain births to teenagers 15 - 17 years at a rate of 21 percent for CY 2009 through CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, increase the percent of mothers who breastfeed their infants at six months of age from 27 percent in CY 2009; 27 percent in CY 2010; and 28 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, increase the proportion of African American women who choose to breastfeed their newborn infants from 55 percent in CY 2009; 58 percent in CY 2010; and 60 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, maintain the percent women who smoke in the last three months of pregnancy at a rate of 10  percent or lower for CY 2009 through CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, maintain the percent of Medicaid eligible pregnant women active in FCM and WIC in the first trimester at a rate of 46 percent in CY 2009 through CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease the rate of unintended pregnancy from a rate of 42.0 in CY 2009; to a rate of 41.5 in CY 2010 and a rate of 41.0 in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, maintain the percent of women receiving services from WIC and/or FCM as a percent of Medicaid eligible pregnant women at a rate of 89 percent for CY 2009 through CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease the rate of infant deaths per 1,000 live births from a rate of 6.0 in CY 2009; to a rate of 4.5 in CY 2010 and a rate of 4.0 in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease the rate of deaths per 1,000 live births among African Americans from a rate of 9.0 in CY 2009; to a rate of 9.0 in CY 2010 and a rate of 8.5 in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease the rate of deaths per 1,000 live births among Hispanic/Latino's from a rate of 5.5 in CY 2009; to a rate of 4.1 in CY 2010 and a rate of 4.0 in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease the percent of low birth weight infants from 7.6 in CY2009 to 5.0 in CY2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, maintain the proportion of individuals at or below 100 percent FPL that receive Title X Family Planning services at 75 percent from CY2009 through CY2011.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 35

Improve the health status of children and adolescents.

Objective(s)
  • By December 31, 2011, increase the percent of children receiving Early Intervention service that are under age 1 from 13 percent in CY 2009; 14 percent in CY 2010; 15 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, increase the percent of 19 to 35 month olds who have received the full schedule of age appropriate immunizations against measles, mumps, rebella, polio, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hemophilus, influenza and Hepatitis B from 85 percent in CY 2009; to 90 percent in CY 2010; and 92 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, maintain the percentage of children without health insurance at a rate of 5.9 percent from CY 2009 to CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease 10th grade children reporting use of alcohol in the past month from 40 percent in CY 2009; to 38 percent in CY 2010; and 35 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, decrease the percent children ages 2 to 5 years receiving WIC services that have a Body Mass Index (BMI) at or above the 85th percentile from 29.8 percent in CY 2009; to 29.5 percent in CY 2010; and 29.0 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, increase the percent of females age 15-24 receiving services at Title X Family Planning Clinics who received at least one test for Chlamydia from 59 percent in CY 2009; to 60 percent in CY 2010; and 61 percent in CY 2011.

Priority VI - Integration

Implement cross-cutting processes that enhance achievement of the agency's core mission and provide seamless integrated services for individuals, families and communities.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 86

Enhance the capacity of the youth services system in Illinois

Objective(s)
  • By October 31, 2011, release an RFP for consolidated youth services programming.
  • By December 31, 2011, identify providers for consolidated youth services programming.
  • By December 31, 2011, reduce Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services (CCBYS) and Unified Delinquency Intervention Services (UDIS) youth assessed to be at high risk of delinquency from 40 percent in CY 2009; to 39 percent in CY 2010; and 38 percent in CY 2011.
  • By December 31, 2011, increase CCBYS and UDIS youth whose cases are closed due to family reunification from 80 percent in CY 2009; to 81 percent in CY 2010; and 82 percent in CY 2011.

Strategic Goal/Initiative 87

Develop community-based networks to strengthen and integrate delivery of DCHP services at the community level.

Objective(s)
  • By July 31, 2011, the Integrated Prevention Framework will be implemented throughout the division and its local service provider partners.