Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services (CCBYS)

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.

Administered by: Bureau of Youth Intervention Services

Goals:

To increase family reunification/preserve and stabilize families; and to divert or minimize involvement in the child welfare and/or juvenile justice system.

Outcome:

Youth will be safe; stable; diverted from the child welfare system and diverted from juvenile justice system.

Program Description:

CCBYS is authorized by the Children and Family Services Act (20 ILCS 505/17 and 17a), and implements Article 3 of the Illinois Juvenile Court Act of 1987 (705 ILCS 405/3 et seq.). This statewide 24/7 crisis intervention system is mandated to serve youth in crisis (runaways, lock-outs, beyond control and in physical danger) and also serves youth in high-risk situations, and their families when appropriate, according to their needs and in keeping with the goal of family preservation, reunification and/or family stabilization, or independence, dependent upon the youth's needs. A continuum of services is available statewide and provided to youth at risk of involvement in the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems.

Target Population: 

Any youth who are 11-17 years of age and at risk of involvement with the child welfare and/or juvenile justice system are eligible for CCBYS services. 

  1. Crisis Youth (Mandated)  
    The CCBYS program considers crisis youth to be: Runaways, lockouts (home & institutions), and youth beyond the control of parents in circumstances which constitute an immediate or substantial danger to the youth's physical safety. These youth will be served 24/7 statewide.
  2. Non-Crisis Youth (Discretionary) The CCBYS program considers non-crisis youth to be those youth that are no currently in crisis. Non-crisis youth are considered to be those youth at risk of crisis or at risk of delinquency, or both. These at risk youth are eligible to receive CCBYS services at the determination of the CCBYS program provider agency.

Activities: 

  • Statewide 24 hour crisis intervention services
  • Juvenile justice system intervention services
  • Ensure the safety of youth
  • Individual and family crisis intervention
  • Conduct Crisis/Safety Assessment
  • Develop and implement crisis stabilization plan
  • Reunification and family preservation services
  • Provide Placement services for crisis youth - Shelter, foster care, etc.
  • Conduct full YASI assessments (Initial Assessment, Reassessment and/or Closing Assessment)
  • Conduct additional assessments as needed (mental health, substance abuse; trauma, etc.)
  • Develop and implement an individualized case plan to address identified needs
  • Work with youth and family to increase protective factors and decrease risk factors
  • Develop and implement a discharge plan
  • Provide appropriate referral and follow-up

CCBYS Logic Model

Program Sites/Service Areas: 

CCBYS is a network of community-based providers serving the entire state. Currently there are 33 funded agencies with 12 subcontractors.

CCBYS Program Data & Performance - 2015

CCBYS Youth Served

7,020 youth were served in the CCBYS Program in 2015. They breakdown as follows:

  1. Crisis Youth
    2,984 or 43% of the CCBYS youth served were identified as crisis/mandated cases. (Runaways, lockouts, and youth beyond the control of parents in circumstances which constitute an immediate or substantial danger to the youth's physical safety)
    • 1,325 or 44% were runaways
    • 941 or 32% were lockouts
      • 744 or 79% were parental lockouts
      • 188 or 20% were institutional lockouts
        • 122 or 65% were psychiatric lockouts
        • 38 or 20% were secure confinement lockouts (IDJJ/County Detention)
        • 28 or 15% were lockouts from other impatient treatment facilities.
    • 718 or 24% were beyond control & in immediate physical danger
  2. Non-Crisis Youth
    4,036 or 57%
    of youth served were identified as non-crisis (discretionary) youth.
    (Non-crisis youth are those youth not currently in crisis. Youth at risk of crisis or youth at risk of delinquency, or both, are eligible to receive CCBYS services.)
    • 2,728 or 68% of youth were at risk of crisis
    • 1,308 or 32% of youth were at risk of delinquency

Primary Program Referral Sources

  • 3,297 or 47% of youth were referred to the program by law enforcement related organizations.
  • 1,674 or 24% of youth were referred to the program by educational institutions-either in school or after school

2015 Performance Measures and Outcomes

  • 7,020 youth were served in the CCBYS Program in 2015
  • 5,001 youth exited the program in 2015
  • 92.41% of youth were in a family/long-term living arrangement at case closure
  • 88.4% of youth with a case plan successfully completed that case plan
  • 93.09% of youth with identified Mental Health (MH) needs received services to address those needs. (1,940 of 2,048 youth identified)
  • 79.99% of youth with identified Substance Abuse (SA) needs received services to address those needs. (1,127 of 1,409 youth identified)
  • 93.13% of youth with identified chronic truancy needs received services to address those needs (610 of 655 youth identified)
  • 95.72% of youth with identified trauma needs received services to address those needs (1,789 of 1,869 youth identified)
  • 84.87% of youth with identified learning disability needs received services to address those needs (415 of 489 youth identified)

Additional Program Data 2015

  • The average length of stay in the CCBYS program for successful youth was 4.37 months.
  • 646 or 21.65% of crisis youth required an agency-arranged placement.
  • 2,435 nights of placement were provided to the 646 youth at an average 3.77 nights per youth.
  • A reported $267,218.72 was spent on these placements, for an average cost of $109.74 per night.

State Systems - Diversions 2015

Of the 5,001 youth discharged during 2015, only 176 or 3.52% of youth were in secure confinement or in DCFS care at case closure. (This excludes the 46 youth that were determined to be current DCFS wards at the time of enrollment.) This 3.52% breaks down as follows:

  • 1% (51) of the 5,001 youth discharged from the program in 2015 were reportedly in secure confinement at case closure. Only 16 of those youth residing in state funded systems (IDJJ/IDOC).
    • 1 or 2% of youth were in County Jail
    • 34 or 67% of youth were in County Detention
    • 15 or 29% of youth were in IDJJ
    • 1 or 2% of youth were in IDOC
  • 2.5% (125) of the 5,001 youth discharged from the program in 2015 were in the care of DCFS at case closure.
    • 77 or 69% of referrals were the direct result of initial safety assessment findings.
    • 40 or 31% of referrals were because the youth had no viable family option.
  • Without CCBYS:

    • All of the 2,984 crisis youth would have gone directly to DCFS as hotline calls to be investigated.
    • Many of the 2,728 youth served that were at risk of crisis would have also quickly become DCFS hotline calls were it not for the intervention services provided by CCBYS.

Cost Savings 2015

  • CCBYS providers served 7,020 youth in 2015 at an average per capita cost of $1,862 per youth.
  • In 2015, CCBYS providers contributed $2,288,749.41 in required match from non-state funding.
  • The average per capita cost to house a youth in IDJJ in 2015 remained $111,000.
  • The annual DCFS residential placement cost in 2015 remains approximately $100,000 per youth. It is important to note that these youth, remain in DCFS residential placement for multiple years at this rate.


Links & Resources