WAG 19-02-07

The intensive case review is designed to address all aspects of a family's situation. It can be especially helpful in identifying barriers facing a client who has not yet reached independence.

Purpose of the Intensive Case Review

An intensive case review is designed to:

  • identify barriers to independence,
  • provide appropriate referrals, and
  • develop an RSP that takes into account the client's remaining limited time to receive TANF and that is consistent with the goal of moving the client toward independence.

The intensive case review draws on the skills of the client's caseworker, supervisor, and other critical support staff (e.g., DCFS staff, domestic new textor sexual violence providers, TPS staff, etc). Together these persons:

  • review with the client their family's history and present circumstances, and
  • gather information critical to developing a meaningful, comprehensive plan to achieve self-sufficiency for the client and their family.

When is an Intensive Case Review Required?

An intensive case review may be completed at anytime, but no later than when the client's TANF counter reaches 24. If the client remains on TANF, another intensive case review is required no later than when the client's counter reaches 36.

For Whom is an Intensive Case Review Required?

An intensive case review is required for every case, except one in which the clock is stopped because:

  • a client is employed at least 30 hours a week (35 for an 06 case),
  • a client meets the educational degree program criteria,
  • a client provides full-time care to a child or spouse in the home due to their medical condition (Family Care),
  • of the presence of a child approved for a Home and Community-based Care Program Waiver, or
  • a client is participating in the Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) Project.

An intensive case review is required for a case with a counter at 24 or greater in which the clock is stopped due to the client having a revised textFamily Violence Exclusion. It is important that we work intensively with the client to:

  • ensure the family's safety,
  • allow the client the best possible chance to achieve self-sufficiency, and
  • avoid this problem in the future.

What Makes Up an Intensive Case Review?

The Intensive Case Review consists of:

  • preparation prior to the client interview,
  • client interview,
  • multi-disciplinary staffing, and
  • follow-up meeting.

What Documentation is Required for an Intensive Case Review?

Document in the case record the information obtained during the client interview and the results of the multi-disciplinary staffing and the follow-up interview.

Transfer-in Cases

An office that receives a transfer-in case whose counter is at the 24th month or greater is required to review the record to determine if an intensive case review has been completed. If an intensive case review has not been completed, complete one as soon as possible.

If an intensive case review has been completed, review it and the Responsibility and Services Plan (RSP) to determine if any revisions in the client's RSP are needed due to the change in the client's living arrangements or situation. If necessary, complete another intensive case review.