21-444-80-2377-01 Illinois Youth Investment Program (IYIP)

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.

Summary Information

1. Awarding Agency Name: Department of Human Services 
2. Agency Contact: Karrie Rueter, Associate Director
Illinois Department of Human Services
Division of Family & Community Services
Bureau of Positive Youth Development
823 E Monroe, Springfield, IL 60701
Karrie.Rueter@illinois.gov
3. Announcement Type: Initial announcement
4. Type of Assistance Instrument: Grant
5. Funding Opportunity Number: 21-444-80-2377-01
6. Funding Opportunity Title: Illinois Youth Investment Program
7. CSFA Number: 444-80-2377
8. CSFA Popular Name: Illinois Youth Investment Program (IYIP) 
9. CFDA Number(s): NA
10. Anticipated Number of Awards: 25-50
11. Estimated Total Program Funding: $17,000,000.00
12. Award Range Not Applicable 
13. Source of Funding: State
14. Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No
15. Indirect Costs Allowed Yes
Restrictions on Indirect Costs These General Revenue funds are used by the Department
as TANF Maintenance of Effort. This means that for provider
purposes, these funds will be considered Federal in nature
and will carry a 15% cap on Indirect costs.
16. Posted Date: April 15, 2020 
17.Application Range: April 15, 2020 to July 1, 2020 by 12:00pm (noon) 
18. Technical Assistance Session:

Session Offered: Yes
Session Mandatory: No

Specify date and time: April 29th & 30th, and June 1st
Register here

AMENDED VERSION - 5/18/2020

This Funding Notice was amended on 5/18/2020. Revision highlights:

  • Extended Due Date for Submission - Wednesday July 1, 2020 at 12:00p.m.

  • FY21Grant Award Period - August 1, 2020 to June 30, 2020.

  • Category #1 Performance Measure removed.

  • Other changes to coincide with the above revisions.

  • Revised Answers to previously posted Q&A - Please refer to Q&A page

  1. Program Description
    Governor Pritzker is committed to attracting new businesses to Illinois, putting people to work on infrastructure and creating opportunities for Illinois communities that have been left behind for too long. To this end, and to ensure that Illinois' at-risk youth population is not being left behind as the state begins to rebuild following the COVID-19 pandemic, the State is making an investment that will begin to ensure Illinois' at-risk youth, 16-24, have an equitable opportunity to participate in the employment successes of the State. The Illinois Youth Investment Program has been established to empower and support these young people along their path toward successful, long-term and career employment.
    Prior to the Covid-19 Pandemic, Illinois unemployment rates were at or near record lows, and many adults had successfully gained or increased employment, however, youth unemployment continued to lag far behind. In January 2020, the overall unemployment rate in Illinois was down to 3.7%. This compared to a youth (16-24) unemployment rate of 11.3% (2017). Even though this rate was nearly 4 times the overall unemployment rate and was consistent with data nationally, this youth unemployment rate is misleading, particularly for youth of color. Unemployment for African American youth in Illinois is 6% higher than the national average, 23.8% compared to 17.9%.
    According to the research conducted by the University of Illinois at Chicago, Great Cities Institute in 2019 (Appendix A), youth in Illinois, particularly those youth in the central and southern regions have some of the highest rates of out-of-school and out-of-work youth in the state. This is profoundly true for youth of color in these more rural counties. For example: While White youth, 20-24, in the southernmost counties of the state are experiencing unemployment at twice the state rate (22.5%), the rates for African American youth in this part of the state average 46.6%. The Hispanic/Latino population in this area fairs considerably better than their African American counterparts, however, they too lag far behind the state average at 24.1%. Similarly, in the southcentral counties, out-of-school and out-of-work African American youth 20-24 average 63.7% compared to their White peers at 16.7% and their Hispanic/Latino peers at 36.4%.
    In general, youth 16-24 fair significantly better in larger and more urban communities in Illinois where there are greater opportunities for employment and education, yet even in places like Chicago, African American youth experience the greatest disparity. In the city of Chicago, 14.6% of youth are out-of-school and out-of-work. African American youth account for 53% of this total. This is an out-of-school and out-of-work rate of 25.6% for African American youth. Racial, ethnic and geographic income disparities in the state are also significant, with African Americans earning approximately 50% less than their White counterparts, according to the 2019 Illinois Kids Count Report (Appendix C).
    Disconnected youth face multiple barriers to employment including lack of work experience, lack of employment opportunities, lack of education, homelessness, justice system involvement, poverty, etc. For example: According to the 2019 Illinois Kids Count Report (Appendix C), the lower 10 counties in Illinois encompass the top 5 counties with youth living in poverty with all 5 counties having a poverty rate greater than 30% and as high as 48.6% (Alexander). In addition, there are 13 counties in Illinois with a homeless student population of 5% or more, up to 9.2% (Jefferson). All 13 of these counties are in the lower 1/3 of the state.
    In the State of Illinois, the public and private sector alike are conducting a broad number of efforts pertaining to education, workforce development, and economic development. At the intersection of these efforts is a broad philosophy around college and career pathways that enable Illinois residents to progressively build toward college and career success through aligned education, training, and employment opportunities over their lifetime. These education and training programs and initiatives are administered by a variety of private, state, and local entities and all fall within this system of college and career pathways. As such, a common Career Pathways definition has been formally adopted by all relevant State Agencies / Boards. This broad-based agreement reflects a major accomplishment through which Illinois is pioneering a new approach to collaboration across education, training, and workforce. This funding notice has infused many of the basic elements of this Career Pathways approach. More information can be found in the Career Pathways Dictionary that can be accessed at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/IL-Career-Pathways-Dictionary.PDF

    The Illinois Youth Investment Program (IYIP)
    is a multi-faceted approach to youth employment that invests in the future of Illinois' at-risk transition-age youth (16-24). This approach to youth employment accounts for the youth's employment barriers as well as the physical, emotional, social, and mental health needs while helping them to secure and sustain long-term and/or career employment thereby ensuring a greater likelihood of success and self-sufficiency.
    The Department has identified four program categories for which it is making grant funding available. Each of the first three categories are designed to take into account various stages of a youth's employment readiness and employment needs. The fourth and final category, addresses the need within the State and local communities to develop additional employer training programs.
    This multi-faceted approach will allow applicants to consider programming and services best suited to meet the needs of youth. An application may be submitted to serve youth under a single program category, or a single application can be submitted to serve youth in two or more program categories. Applicants may not submit more than one application to serve youth in the same County.
    The Department is accepting applications to serve youth in one or more of the following 4 program categories.
    1. Program Description by Category
      1. Category I - Short-term, Summer Employment
        (Work-based Learning; Career Development Experience; and Pre-Apprenticeship programs)
        1. Overview
          This Category is designed to target those youth who are interested in short-term Summer employment with a goal of developing workplace skills and gaining employment experience while exploring potential Career Pathways. Community-based providers will partner with local employers in need of Summer workers. Youth targeted in this category will be placed in age-appropriate, ability-appropriate, and experience-appropriate Work-Based Learning Opportunities, Career Development Experience Opportunities or Pre-Apprenticeship programs targeting a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship. This may be accomplished by placing and supporting youth in unsubsidized employment, or through an agreement with the employer to fully or partially subsidize the youth's wages for a period not to exceed 3 months (13 weeks).
        2. Objective
          The primary objective for youth served in Category I is to develop their "Essential Employability Skills" and to earn a minimum of 180 hours of entry-level work experience.
        3. Eligible Youth Participants:
          Low income and/or at-risk in-school and out-of-school youth ages 16-24 who can document Illinois residency and are able to provide an I9 prior to employment. Examples of risk factors that will deem a youth qualified for the program include:
          Youth residing in a household receiving TANF funds Youth has an IEP (Individual Education Plan)
          Youth residing in a household receiving SNAP funds Youth has witnessed or been a victim of family violence
          Youth is eligible for Free/Reduced lunch Youth identifies as LGBTQ
          Youth living in a single-parent household Youth has current or prior school expulsions or suspensions
          Youth experiencing academic difficulties Youth with siblings who dropped out of school
          Youth is in danger of or has been previously held back to repeat one or more academic years Youth with siblings who are teen parents
          Youth experiencing truancy concerns Youth has current or prior justice system involvement
          Youth is reported to have behavior issues Youth with siblings who are involved in the juvenile justice system
          Youth is reported to be a victim of bullying Youth with one or both parents who are incarcerated
          Youth is reported to be a perpetrator of bullying Youth is pregnant
          Youth is unsupervised after school Youth is parenting
          Youth with siblings who are gang involved Youth has a disability
          Youth is reported to be gang - involved Youth with no work experience
          Youth has current or prior DCFS system involvement Youth with a history of employment failure
          Youth is experiencing homelessness
        4. Required Program Components:
          1. Paid Work Experience
            All youth will participate in a short-term, 13 week, Work-Based Learning Opportunity, Career Development Experience or Pre-Apprenticeship program targeting a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship. This 13 week work experience requires a minimum 180 hours of paid work.
            1. Work-Based Learning
              Work-based learning provides participants with work-based opportunities to practice and enhance the skills and knowledge gained in their program of study or industry training program, as well as to develop employability, and includes an assessment and recognition of acquired knowledge and skills. Examples include internships, service learning, paid work experience, on-the-job training, and transitional jobs.
            2. Career Development Experience
              A supervised work experience relating to an individual's career area of interest that:
              • Occurs in a workplace or under other authentic working conditions;
              • Is co-developed by at least one employer in the relevant field and a service provider and/or an education provider;
              • Provides compensation or educational credit to the participant;
              • Reinforces foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework; and
              • Includes a Professional Skills Assessment that assesses skill development and is utilized as a participant feedback tool.
                Career Development Experiences may include any of the following, provided the experience meets the definitional criteria: internship, school-based enterprise, supervised agricultural experience, student-led enterprise, or youth apprenticeship.
            3. Pre-Apprenticeship Program
              A program that has a documented partnership with an employer and is designed to prepare individuals to enter and succeed in a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship which includes all the following:
              • Training and curriculum that aligns with the skill needs of employers in the region and that has been designed to prepare participants to meet the minimum entry-level requirements of the Apprenticeship.
              • Access to educational and career counseling, and other supportive services as needed by participants.
              • Hands-on meaningful learning activities that are connected to education and training activities, such as Career Exploration and Career Development Experiences, and that reinforce
                foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework.
              • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program and may receive preference for enrollment.
          2. Employment Readiness Activities
            All programs will be designed to ensure that all youth are prepared for employment. This includes for example, how to conduct a job search, write a resume, complete an application, how to dress for an interview, appropriate workplace attire, attitude etc. All youth will complete, through Illinois workNet, the Career Cluster Inventory; the Employment 101 pre-assessment, work readiness activities, and post-assessments as necessary to demonstrate work readiness skills improvement.
          3. Essential Employability Skills (EES) Development
            1. Self - Assessment - Each youth in the program will complete an initial skills self-assessment.
            2. Skill Development - Programming, services, education and training will be provided and tailored to meet the individualized needs of each youth based on the results of this assessment. (Additional skills assessments can also be incorporated into this process.)
            3. Worksite Professional Skills Assessment - Employers will be required to conduct an assessment on the youth's demonstrated employment skills that at a minimum include Illinois' Essential Employability Skills. This will be conducted at the end of the 2nd week of employment and again anytime within the last 3 weeks of employment. This may also be conducted upon termination if the placement ends prematurely. The first assessment will serve as feedback for the youth and the provider. The second will document skill attainment/improvement.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix K - Illinois' Essential Employability Skills.
          4. Support Services
            1. Employment Support Services
              Supportive services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, work clothes, tools and supplies, or other items that are required for youth to participate in the program.
            2. Social Emotional Support Services.
              Individualized, assessment-based case plan services that incorporate goals to address social-emotional barriers to successful employment.
            3. Life Skills Assessment/Development.
              Services will be provided to youth to increase their life skills in the following areas: Daily Living; Relationships & Communications; Housing & Money Management; Self Care; Work & Study Life; and Permanent Connections. The service plan should be assessment-based (Casey Life Skills Assessment (CLSA)) and age appropriate.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix L - Casey Life Skills Assessment Tool & Guide.
          5. Case Management
            An individualized case plan will be developed with the involvement of the youth (and family where appropriate) that incorporates at a minimum: Employment Skills Development; Employment Support Services; Social-Emotional Support Services and Life-Skills Development.
        5. Wage Subsidies / Stipends - Category I
          Wages may be subsidized by the grant for work experience only. This will include employment, work experience, internships, on-the-job training, transitional jobs, apprenticeships, and supervised school-based and youth-led enterprise. Youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, assessments, case management activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities.
          Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category I is limited to a maximum of 5 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
          Wage subsidies/stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Youth must be paid at least the applicable minimum wage for the jurisdiction in which the youth is employed, and the grant may not provide a wage subsidy or stipend in excess of $10.00 per hour or $13.00 per hour for employment within the City of Chicago. Full and Part-time wages may be subsidized in whole or in part with grant funding up to 3 months (13 weeks) per enrolled youth. The calculation of the 3-month limitation only includes periods during which the youth is earning a full or partial subsidized wage and periods in which a youth is earning a stipend. The 3-month limitation is a limitation per participant, not per placement and considers both stipends and subsidies paid. For example, if a youth's subsidized job placement ends after 9 weeks, and the youth receives a new subsidized job placement, the new job placement may only be subsidized for 4 weeks. Programs that are able to off-set the wage subsidies with other funds or have the capacity to provide unsubsidized opportunities, step down, or partial subsidies will be able to stretch funding to allow for additional youth to be served in the program.
      2. Category II - Targeted Long-term Employment
        (Targeted long-term employment and Youth Apprenticeship programs)
        1. Overview
          This Category is designed to target those youth who are ready to focus on long-term sustained employment that may or may not yet have an identified career path, sector, or industry. Community-based providers will partner with local employers to place youth in long-term employment opportunities within three months of enrollment. These employment placements may be part-time or full-time based on the needs of the youth. Youth targeted in this category will be placed in age-appropriate, ability-appropriate, and experience-appropriate employment linked to one of the 17 nationally recognized career clusters. Youth will be engaged in either targeted long-term employment or in a Youth Apprenticeship program that targets a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship, admission to other articulated postsecondary education, or sustained employment. This may be accomplished by placing and supporting youth in unsubsidized employment, or through an agreement with the employer to fully or partially subsidize the youth's wages for a period not to exceed 9 months (39 weeks/270 days). Fully or partially subsidized wages and/or stipends may also be paid by the grant for youth participating in a Youth Apprenticeship program for a total period not to exceed 9 months (39 weeks/270 days)
        2. Objective
          The primary objective for youth served in Category II is long-term unsubsidized employment in a targeted Illinois industry, or competition of a Youth Apprenticeship program and acceptance into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program; admission to other articulated postsecondary education; or sustained employment.
        3. Eligible Youth Participants:
          Low income and at-risk in-school and out-of-school youth ages 16-24 who can document Illinois residency and are able to provide an I9 prior to employment. Examples of risk factors that will deem a youth qualified for the program include:
          Youth residing in a household receiving TANF funds Youth with siblings who are involved in the juvenile justice system
          Youth residing in a household receiving TANF funds Youth with one or both parents who are incarcerated
          Youth residing in a household receiving SNAP funds Youth with siblings who are gang involved
          Youth is eligible for Free/Reduced lunch Youth is reported to be gang - involved
          Youth living in a single-parent household Youth has current or prior DCFS system involvement
          Youth experiencing academic difficulties Youth is experiencing homelessness
          Youth is in danger of or has been previously held back to repeat one or more academic years Youth is pregnant
          Youth experiencing truancy concerns Youth is parenting
          Youth is reported to have behavior issues Youth has a disability
          Youth is reported to be a victim of bullying Youth with no work experience
          Youth is reported to be a perpetrator of bullying Youth with a history of employment failure
          Youth is unsupervised after school
          Youth has an IEP (Individual Education Plan)
          Youth has witnessed or been a victim of family violence
          Youth identifies as LGBTQ
          Youth has current or prior school expulsions or suspensions
          Youth with siblings who dropped out of school
          Youth with siblings who are teen parents
          Youth has current or prior justice system involvement
        4. Required Program Components:
          1. Paid Long-term Employment or Youth Apprenticeship
            All youth will be placed in either targeted long-term employment or in a Youth Apprenticeship program that targets either a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship or admission to other articulated postsecondary education. Youth will be placed in an employment position or a Youth Apprenticeship program within 3 months of enrollment into this component of the Illinois Youth Investment Program. Supportive services can continue while the youth is enrolled in the Program.
            • Targeted (Industry-Linked) - Employment and apprenticeships are those that are linked to one of seventeen career clusters.
            • Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources Hospitality & Tourism;
              Architecture & Construction; Human Services;
              Arts; Information Technology;
              Audio/Video Technology & Communications; Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security;
              Business Management & Administration; Manufacturing;
              Education & Training; Marketing;
              Finance; Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics; and
              Government & Public Administration; Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics.
              Health Science;
            • Long-term Employment -An employment position that is not temporary in nature. A position that, should the youth successfully complete a probationary period, the youth would continue to work indefinitely. Sustained employment.
            • Youth Apprenticeship - A program for youth (ages 16 to 24) currently enrolled in secondary education or pursuing a high school equivalency, including those with disabilities, that include, at minimum, the following:
              • Programs must include a documented partnership with an employer.
              • 450 hours of paid on-the-job training
              • At least 2 semesters of related instruction that ideally counts towards a high school and/or postsecondary cre-dential, but minimally leading to an Industry Credential;
              • Ongoing and a final assessment measuring success in mastering skill standards;
              • Career exploration where participants learn about several positions within the employer and the field; and
              • Wraparound supports (e.g. case management and counseling) and holistic upskilling (e.g. technical skills and soft skills).
              • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for one or more of the following: entry-level employment, admission to a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program, or admission to other articulated postsecondary education options (including 2- and 4-year programs).
          2. Employment Readiness Activities
            All programs will be designed to ensure that all youth are prepared for employment. This includes for example, how to conduct a job search, write a resume, complete an application, how to dress for an interview, appropriate workplace attire, attitude etc. All youth will complete, through Illinois workNet, the Career Cluster Inventory; the Employment 101 pre-assessment, work readiness activities, and post-assessments as necessary to demonstrate work readiness skills improvement.
          3. Essential Employability Skills Development
            • Self - Assessment - Each youth in the program will complete an initial skills self-assessment.
            • Skill Development - Programming, services, education and training will be provided and tailored to meet the individualized needs of each youth based on the results of this assessment. (Additional skills assessments can also be incorporated into this process.)
            • Worksite Professional Skills Assessment - Employers will be required to conduct an assessment on the youth's demonstrated employment skills that at a minimum include Illinois' Essential Employability Skills. This will be conducted at the end of the 2nd week of employment and again anytime within the last 3 weeks of employment and again between week 10 and week 12. This may also be conducted upon termination if the placement ends prematurely. The first assessment will serve as feedback for the youth and the provider. The second will document skill attainment/improvement. Additional assessments may be conducted.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix K - Illinois' Essential Employability Skills.
          4. Support Services
            • Employment Support Services.
              Supportive services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, work clothes, tools and supplies, or other items that are required for youth to participate in the program.
            • Social Emotional Support Services.
              Individualized, assessment-based case plan services that incorporate goals to address social-emotional barriers to successful employment.
            • Life Skills Assessment/Development.
              Services will be provided to youth to increase their life skills in the following areas: Daily Living; Relationships & Communications; Housing & Money Management; Self Care; Work & Study Life; and Permanent Connections. The service plan should be assessment-based (Casey Life Skills Assessment) and age appropriate.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix L - Casey Life Skills Assessment Tool & Guide.
            • Educational Support Services.
              Educational support services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, clothes, books and supplies, tutoring, academic advising, advocacy, course fees, license and testing fees or other items that are required for youth to participate in education.
            • Career Plan Development.
              Individualized career plan that incorporates both short and long-term educational and employment goals necessary to achieving sustained employment in a chosen career path. Involves the youth and considers an inventory of the youth's skills, talents and interests.
          5. Case Management
            An individualized case plan will be developed with the involvement of the youth (and family where appropriate) that incorporates at a minimum: Skill Development; Employment Support Services; Social-Emotional Support Services; Life-Skills Development; and Educational Support Services.
        5. Optional Program Components:
          Youth may participate in Career Exploration Activities and / or a Career Development Experience in an effort to prepare youth for a long-term employment placement or a Youth-Apprenticeship placement.
          • Career Exploration Activity
            Any activity such as a job shadow, attendance at a career exposition, or employer site visit providing an individual with the ability to engage directly with employers, for the purpose of gaining knowledge of one or more industry sectors or occupations.
          • Career Development Experience
            A supervised work experience relating to an individual's career area of interest that:
            • Occurs in a workplace or under other authentic working conditions;
            • Is co-developed by at least one employer in the relevant field and a service provider and/or an education provider;
            • Provides compensation or educational credit to the participant;
            • Reinforces foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework; and
            • Includes a Professional Skills Assessment that assesses skill development and is utilized as a participant feedback tool.
            • Takes place for a minimum of 60 total hours.
              Career Development Experiences may include any of the following, provided the experience meets the definitional criteria: internship, school-based enterprise, supervised agricultural experience, student-led enterprise, or youth apprenticeship.
        6. Wage subsidies & stipends - Category II
          Wages may be fully or partially subsidized by the grant for the hours worked for both long-term employment and the required minimum 450 on-the-job training hours worked for the Youth Apprenticeship Program. Further, stipends may be paid for the 2 semesters of related instruction that counts toward a high-school and/or postsecondary credential and/or an industry Credential as part of the Youth Apprenticeship program. Should a youth participate in a Career Development Experience, the grant may be used to fully or partially subsidize a wage or to pay a stipend provided the Experience meets the minimal definition criteria above. In total, the wage subsidies and/or stipends in Category II may not exceed a period of 9 months (39 weeks) per youth.
          Note: As a general rule, the employer pays the wage for an Apprenticeship program. In this case, grant funds would only be used to pay stipends. Further, stipends may not be paid for the same hour for which a youth is earning a wage, regardless of payee.
          Except as noted above, youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, Career Awareness Activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities. Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category II is limited to a maximum of 10 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
          Wage subsidies / stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Youth must be paid at least the applicable minimum wage for the jurisdiction in which the youth is employed, and the grant may not provide a wage subsidy or stipend in excess of $10.00 per hour or $13.00 per hour for employment within the City of Chicago. Full and Part-time wages may be subsidized in whole or in part with grant funding up to 9 months (39 weeks) per enrolled youth. The calculation of the 9-month limitation only includes periods during which the youth is earning a full or partial subsidized wage and/or a stipend. The 9-month limitation is a limitation per participant, not per placement and considers both stipends and subsidies paid. For example, if a youth's subsidized job placement ends after 10 weeks, and the youth receives a new subsidized job placement, the new job placement may only be subsidized for 29 weeks. Programs that are able to off-set the wage subsidies with other funds or have the capacity to provide unsubsidized opportunities, step down, or partial subsidies will be able to stretch funding to allow for additional youth to be served in the program.
      3. Category III - Career Development - Industry-linked Long-term Employment
        (Registered Apprenticeship; Non-Registered Apprenticeship; and Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses)) 
        1. Overview
          This Category is designed to target those youth who are ready to focus on an identified career path, sector, or industry. Community-based providers will develop partnerships with established employer and/or Industry Association training programs to identify, refer and support youth participants in these programs that meet the skill needs of local employers and industry. These training programs will provide immediate job placement opportunities for the youth upon completion. Within three months of enrollment into the program, youth will be placed in age-appropriate, ability-appropriate, and experience-appropriate career development training programs in a youth's identified area of interest that is linked to one of the seventeen career clusters. This will be accomplished by recruiting, referring and supporting youth in these established training programs. With limited exceptions, these will be full time employment positions. Fully or partially subsidized wages and/or stipends may be paid by the grant for youth participating in Apprenticeships and credentialing programs for a total period not to exceed 12 months (52 weeks).
        2. Objective
          The primary objective for youth served in Category III is long-term unsubsidized employment in local industry upon completion of established Apprenticeship/Credentialing programs.
        3. Eligible Youth Participants:
          Low income and at-risk in-school and out-of-school youth ages 16-24 who can document Illinois residency and are able to provide an I9 prior to employment. Examples of risk factors that will deem a youth qualified for the program include:
          Youth residing in a household receiving TANF funds Youth is reported to have behavior issues
          Youth residing in a household receiving SNAP funds Youth is reported to be a victim of bullying
          Youth is eligible for Free/Reduced lunch Youth is reported to be a perpetrator of bullying
          Youth living in a single-parent household Youth is unsupervised after school
          Youth experiencing academic difficulties Youth has an IEP (Individual Education Plan)
          Youth is in danger of or has been previously held back to repeat one or more academic years Youth has witnessed or been a victim of family violence
          Youth experiencing truancy concerns Youth identifies as LGBTQ
          Youth with siblings who dropped out of school Youth has current or prior school expulsions or suspensions
          Youth with siblings who are teen parents Youth is reported to be gang - involved
          Youth has current or prior justice system involvement Youth has current or prior DCFS system involvement
          Youth with siblings who are involved in the juvenile justice system Youth is experiencing homelessness
          Youth with one or both parents who are incarcerated Youth is pregnant
          Youth with siblings who are gang involved Youth is parenting
          Youth has a disability
          Youth with no work experience
          Youth with a history of employment failure
        4. Required Program Components:
          1. Registered Apprenticeship; Non-Registered Apprenticeship; and Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses))
            All youth will be placed in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program. Youth may instead or also seek to attain a Recognized Postsecondary Credential (Industry-linked Credential, Certification or License) through other established on-the-job-training programs that lead directly to sustained employment. All youth will be placed within three months of enrollment into this component of the Illinois Youth Investment Program. Youth may continue to receive support services while enrolled in the program.
            • Apprenticeship Models
              An employer-driven, "learn while you earn" model that combines structured on-the-job training with job-related instruction in curricula tied to the attainment of industry-recognized skills standards and leading to an industry credential. The on-the-job training is provided by the employer, who hires the apprentice at the commencement of the program and pays the participant during the program.
              1. Registered Apprenticeship
                An apprenticeship registered with the U.S. Department of Labor meeting the standards defined by USDOL, which includes the five required components:
                • Business Involvement;
                • Structured On-the-Job Training;
                • Related Instruction;
                • Rewards for Skill Gains; and
                • Industry Credentials.
              2. Non-Registered Apprenticeship
                An apprenticeship that is not registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, but that meets all Registered Apprenticeship criteria other than application for registration.
            • Industry Credential
              A work-related credential, certification, or license that:
              • Verifies, through a valid assessment, an individual's qualifications or competence in a specific skillset related to a particular industry or occupation;
              • Is issued by an industry-related organization or state licensing body with the relevant authority to issue such credentials; and
              • Is broadly sought or accepted by employers as a recognized, preferred, or required credential for recruitment, screening, hiring, retention, or advancement purposes.
            • Industry-Linked - Employment, apprenticeships, credentials, etc. that are linked to one of seventeen career clusters.
              • Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources
              • Architecture & Construction;
              • Arts;
              • Audio/Video Technology & Communications;
              • Business Management & Administration;
              • Education & Training;
              • Finance;
              • Government & Public Administration;
              • Health Science;
              • Hospitality & Tourism;
              • Human Services;
              • Information Technology;
              • Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security;
              • Manufacturing;
              • Marketing;
              • Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics; and
              • Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics.
          2. Employment Readiness Activities
            All programs will be designed to ensure that all youth are prepared for employment. This includes for example, how to conduct a job search, write a resume, complete an application, how to dress for an interview, appropriate workplace attire, attitude etc. All youth will complete, through Illinois workNet, the Career Cluster Inventory; the Employment 101 pre-assessment, work readiness activities, and post-assessments as necessary to demonstrate work readiness skills improvement.
          3. Essential Employability Skills Development
            • Self - Assessment - Each youth in the program will complete an initial skills self-assessment.
            • Skill Development - Programming, services, education and training will be provided and tailored to meet the individualized needs of each youth based on the results of this assessment. (Additional skills assessments can also be incorporated into this process.)
            • Worksite Professional Skills Assessment - Employers will be required to conduct an assessment on the youth's demonstrated employment skills that at a minimum include Illinois' Essential Employability Skills. This will be conducted at the end of the 2nd week of employment and again anytime between week 10 and week 12. This may also be conducted upon termination if the placement ends prematurely. The first assessment will serve as feedback for the youth and the provider. The second will document skill attainment/improvement.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix K - Illinois' Essential Employability Skills.
          4. Support Services
            • Employment Support Services.
              Supportive services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, work clothes, tools and supplies, or other items that are required for youth to participate in the program.
            • Social Emotional Support Services.
              Individualized, assessment-based case plan services that incorporate goals to address social-emotional barriers to successful employment.
            • Life Skills Assessment/Development.
              Services will be provided to youth to increase their life skills in the following areas: Daily Living; Relationships & Communications; Housing & Money Management; Self Care; Work & Study Life; and Permanent Connections. The service plan should be assessment-based (Casey Life Skills Assessment) and age appropriate.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix L - Casey Life Skills Assessment Tool & Guide.
            • Educational Support Services.
              Educational support services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, clothes, books and supplies, tutoring, academic advising, advocacy, course fees, license and testing fees or other items that are required for youth to participate in education.
            • Career Plan Development.
              Individualized career plan that incorporates both short and long-term educational and employment goals necessary to achieving sustained employment in a chosen career path. Involves the youth and considers an inventory of the youth's skills, talents and interests.
          5. Case Management
            An individualized case plan will be developed with the involvement of the youth (and family where appropriate) that incorporates at a minimum: Skill Development; Employment Support Services; Social-Emotional Support Services; Life-Skills Development; and Educational Support Services.
        5. Optional Program Components:
          Youth may participate in in a short-term Pre-Apprenticeship Program in an effort to prepare youth for placement in a Registered or Non-registered Apprenticeship or other Industry-linked Credentialing Program as described.
          • Pre-Apprenticeship Program
            A program that has a documented partnership with an employer and is designed to prepare individuals to enter and succeed in a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship which includes all the following:
            • Training and curriculum that aligns with the skill needs of employers in the region and that has been designed to prepare participants to meet the minimum entry-level requirements of the Apprenticeship.
            • Access to educational and career counseling, and other supportive services as needed by participants.
            • Hands-on meaningful learning activities that are connected to education and training activities, such as Career Exploration and Career Development Experiences, and that reinforce foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework.
            • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program and may receive preference for enrollment.
        6. Wage Subsidies & Stipends - Category III
          During participation in the Apprenticeship / Credential training program, youth may receive a weekly stipend not to exceed the equivalent of $10.00 per hour of required training or $13.00 per hour within the City of Chicago. Stipends may only be paid for those training hours required by the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program that are completed and verified. Training stipends and subsidies may not exceed a total period of 12 months (52 weeks).
          Wage subsidies / stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Training stipends will include FICA and workers' compensation as necessary. As a rule, the employer pays the wage for an Apprenticeship program. In this case, grant funds would only be used to pay stipends. In situations where an established training program already pays a wage or stipend for participation in or completion of the training program, the grant may NOT be used to offset or replace this subsidy. Further, stipends may not be paid for the same hour for which a youth is earning a wage, regardless of payee. However, if the employer rate is less than the maximum allowed, the stipend may be paid in addition to but not in lieu of, provided that it at no time exceeds the maximum allowed under the grant ($10.00 / $13.00). If the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program only pays for work hours and not for required training stipends may be paid for those required and verified training hours.
          Except as noted above, youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, Career Awareness Activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities. Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category III is limited to a maximum of 10 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
      4. Category IV - Expansion of Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities
        (Registered Apprenticeships; Non-Registered Apprenticeships; and Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses))
        1. Overview
          Community-based providers will develop partnerships to establish one or more new Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities for youth. These training programs will meet the skill needs of local employers and industry and be immediately available to at-risk youth. The community-based provider will assess the employment barriers of local young people and work with local economic development organizations to identify the skill shortage needs of local employers and industry. The community-based provider will enter into partnership agreements with local employers and/or Industry Associations to develop a skill curriculum for eligible youth that meets the local employer's needs and establishes job placement opportunities for the youth after training.
          Partnerships at a minimum will include a local or regional Community College, a community-based provider and at least one local industry employer. These partnerships will work together to expand industry-linked training program opportunities for youth. Once the new training program has been developed, the community-based provider will refer and support youth through the program(s). Acceptable training programs that will be considered include: Registered Apprenticeships; Non-Registered Apprenticeships; Youth Apprenticeships; and other Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses) leading to sustainable employment in one of seventeen targeted industries and careers.
          DHS intends to support the work of the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) by advancing the goals of their Equity Initiative. ICCB funds a number of Illinois Community Colleges to create, support, or expand short-term workforce training opportunities in high-need communities focused on specific sectors with identified workforce gaps. IYIP applicants applying for Category IV funding will receive scoring preference under this funding notice if they are or are able to demonstrate a program partnership with a Community College implementing the Equity Initiative grant program. (Refer to Section B2,b4 Quality - Description of Program Design and Services for details.) A listing of Community Colleges implementing the Equity Initiative can be found at the following link: https://www.iccb.org/iccb/wp-content/pdfs/workforce/fy2020/FY20_WEI_Grant_Recipients.pdf
          It is expected that the new training program(s) will be in place and that youth will begin participation in those new training program(s) within 120 days from the start of the grant (4 months). The initial cohort of youth should begin enrolling into this program category approximately one (1) month prior to begin preparing to application/participation in the new training program. 
        2. Objective
          The Primary objectives in Category IV is two-fold:
          1. Newly developed training programs for local industry that teach individual youth participants the necessary skills for that industry, and
          2. Long-term unsubsidized employment in a local industry with an identified skills shortage.
        3. Eligible Youth Participants:
          Low income and at-risk in-school and out-of-school youth ages 16-24 who can document Illinois residency and are able to provide an I9 prior to employment. Examples of risk factors that will deem a youth qualified for the program include:
          Youth residing in a household receiving TANF funds Youth has current or prior school expulsions or suspensions
          Youth residing in a household receiving SNAP funds Youth with siblings who dropped out of school
          Youth is eligible for Free/Reduced lunch Youth with siblings who are teen parents
          Youth living in a single-parent household Youth has current or prior justice system involvement
          Youth experiencing academic difficulties Youth with siblings who are involved in the juvenile justice system
          Youth is in danger of or has been previously held back to repeat one or more academic years Youth with one or both parents who are incarcerated
          Youth experiencing truancy concerns Youth with siblings who are gang involved
          Youth is reported to have behavior issues Youth is reported to be gang - involved
          Youth is reported to be a victim of bullying Youth has current or prior DCFS system involvement
          Youth is reported to be a perpetrator of bullying Youth is experiencing homelessness
          Youth is unsupervised after school Youth is pregnant
          Youth has an IEP (Individual Education Plan) Youth is parenting
          Youth has witnessed or been a victim of family violence Youth has a disability
          Youth identifies as LGBTQ Youth with no work experience
          Youth with a history of employment failure
        4. Required Program Components:
          1. Registered Apprenticeship; Non-Registered Apprenticeship; Youth Apprenticeships; and Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses)
            • Establish one or more new Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities for youth that meet the skill needs of local employers and industry and be immediately available to at-risk youth.
            • Assess the employment barriers of local young people and work with local economic development organizations to identify the skill shortage needs of local employers and industry.
            • Enter into partnership agreements with local employers and Community Colleges to develop a skill curriculum for eligible youth that meets the local employer's needs and establishes job placement opportunities for the youth after training.
            • Partnerships at a minimum will include a local or regional Community College, a community-based provider and at least one local industry employer.
            • Once the new training program has been developed, the community-based provider will refer and support youth through the program(s).
              Acceptable training programs to be developed will include: Registered Apprenticeships; Non-Registered Apprenticeships; Youth Apprenticeships; and other Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses) leading to sustainable employment in one of seventeen targeted industries and careers.
              It is expected that the new training program(s) will be in place and that youth will begin participation in those new training program(s) within 120 days from the start of the grant (4 months). The initial cohort of youth should begin enrolling into this program category approximately one (1) month prior to begin preparing to application/participation in the new training program. 
              All youth will be placed in a newly developed Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program and/or an Industry-linked Credential, Certification or Licensing program through other newly developed on-the-job-training programs that lead directly to sustained employment. All youth will be placed within three months of enrollment into this component of the Illinois Youth Investment Program. Youth may continue to receive support services while enrolled in the program.
              • Registered & Non-Registered Apprenticeship Models
                An employer-driven, "learn while you earn" model that combines structured on-the-job training with job-related instruction in curricula tied to the attainment of industry-recognized skills standards and leading to a Recognized Postsecondary Credential. The on-the-job training is provided by the employer, who hires the apprentice at the commencement of the program and pays the participant during the program.
                1. Registered Apprenticeship
                  An apprenticeship registered with the U.S. Department of Labor meeting the standards defined by USDOL, which includes the five required components:
                  • Business Involvement;
                  • Structured On-the-Job Training;
                  • Related Instruction;
                  • Rewards for Skill Gains; and
                  • Industry Credentials.
                2. Non-Registered Apprenticeship
                  An apprenticeship that is not registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, but that meets all Registered Apprenticeship criteria other than application for registration.
              • Youth Apprenticeship - A program for youth (ages 16 to 24) currently enrolled in secondary education or pursuing a high school equivalency, including those with disabilities, that include, at minimum, the following:
                • Programs must include a documented partnership with an employer.
                • 450 hours of paid on-the-job training
                • At least 2 semesters of related instruction that ideally counts towards a high school and/or postsecondary credential, but minimally leading to an Industry Credential;
                • Ongoing and a final assessment measuring success in mastering skill standards;
                • Career exploration where participants learn about several positions within the employer and the field; and
                • Wraparound supports (e.g. case management and counseling) and holistic upskilling (e.g. technical skills and soft skills).
                • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for one or more of the following: entry-level employment, admission to a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program, or admission to other articulated postsecondary education options (including 2- and 4-year programs).
              • Industry Credential
                A work-related credential, certification, or license that:
                • Verifies, through a valid assessment, an individual's qualifications or competence in a specific skillset related to a particular industry or occupation;
                • Is issued by an industry-related organization or state licensing body with the relevant authority to issue such credentials; and
                • Is broadly sought or accepted by employers as a recognized, preferred, or required credential for recruitment, screening, hiring, retention, or advancement purposes.
              • Industry-Linked - Employment, apprenticeships, credentials, etc. that are linked to one of seventeen career clusters.
                Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources Hospitality & Tourism
                Architecture & Construction; Human Services
                Arts; Information Technology;
                Audio/Video Technology & Communications; Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security;
                Business Management & Administration; Manufacturing;
                Education & Training; Marketing;
                Finance; Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics; and
                Government & Public Administration; Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics.
                Health Science;
          2. Employment Readiness Activities
            All programs will be designed to ensure that all youth are prepared for employment. This includes for example, how to conduct a job search, write a resume, complete an application, how to dress for an interview, appropriate workplace attire, attitude etc. All youth will complete, through Illinois workNet, the Career Cluster Inventory; the Employment 101 pre-assessment, work readiness activities, and post-assessments as necessary to demonstrate work readiness skills improvement.
          3. Essential Employability Skills Development
            1. Self - Assessment - Each youth in the program will complete an initial skills self-assessment.
            2. Skill Development - Programming, services, education and training will be provided and tailored to meet the individualized needs of each youth based on the results of this assessment. (Additional skills assessments can also be incorporated into this process.)
            3. Worksite Professional Skills Assessment - Employers will be required to conduct an assessment on the youth's demonstrated employment skills that at a minimum include Illinois' Essential Employability Skills. This will be conducted at the end of the 2nd week of employment and again anytime between week 10 and week 12. This may also be conducted upon termination if the placement ends prematurely. The first assessment will serve as feedback for the youth and the provider. The second will document skill attainment/improvement.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix K - Illinois' Essential Employability Skills.
          4. Support Services
            1. Employment Support Services.
              Supportive services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, work clothes, tools and supplies, or other items that are required for youth to participate in the program.
            2. Social Emotional Support Services.
              Individualized, assessment-based case plan services that incorporate goals to address social-emotional barriers to successful employment.
            3. Life Skills Assessment/Development.
              Services will be provided to youth to increase their life skills in the following areas: Daily Living; Relationships & Communications; Housing & Money Management; Self Care; Work & Study Life; and Permanent Connections. The service plan should be assessment-based (Casey Life Skills Assessment) and age appropriate.
              Please refer to:
              Appendix L - Casey Life Skills Assessment Tool & Guide.
            4. Educational Support Services.
              Educational support services may include transportation assistance, day care expenses, clothes, books and supplies, tutoring, academic advising, advocacy, course fees, license and testing fees or other items that are required for youth to participate in education.
            5. Career Plan Development.
              Individualized career plan that incorporates both short and long-term educational and employment goals necessary to achieving sustained employment in a chosen career path. Involves the youth and considers an inventory of the youth's skills, talents and interests.
          5. Case Management
            An individualized case plan will be developed with the involvement of the youth (and family where appropriate) that incorporates at a minimum: Skill Development; Employment Support Services; Social-Emotional Support Services; Life-Skills Development; and Educational Support Services.
        5. Optional Program Components:
          Youth may participate in in a short-term Pre-Apprenticeship Program in an effort to prepare youth for placement in a Registered or Non-registered Apprenticeship or other Industry-linked Credentialing Program as described.
          1. Pre-Apprenticeship Program
            A program that has a documented partnership with an employer and is designed to prepare individuals to enter and succeed in a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship which includes all the following:
            • Training and curriculum that aligns with the skill needs of employers in the region and that has been designed to prepare participants to meet the minimum entry-level requirements of the Apprenticeship.
            • Access to educational and career counseling, and other supportive services as needed by participants.
            • Hands-on meaningful learning activities that are connected to education and training activities, such as Career Exploration and Career Development Experiences, and that reinforce foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework.
            • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program and may receive preference for enrollment.
        6. Wage Subsidies & Stipends - Category IV
          Grant funding may be used to support coordination activities, research, curriculum development, curriculum and training materials development, and other reasonable and necessary costs associated with the development and establishment of these new training programs.
          During participation in the Apprenticeship / Credential training program, youth may receive a weekly stipend not to exceed the equivalent of $10.00 per hour of required training or $13.00 per hour within the City of Chicago. Stipends may only be paid for those training hours required by the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program that are completed and verified. Training stipends and subsidies may not exceed a total period of 12 months (52 weeks).
          Wage subsidies / stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Training stipends will include FICA and workers' compensation as necessary. As a rule, the employer pays the wage for an Apprenticeship program. In this case, grant funds would only be used to pay stipends. In situations where an established training program already pays a wage or stipend for participation in or completion of the training program, the grant may NOT be used to offset or replace this subsidy. Further, stipends may not be paid for the same hour for which a youth is earning a wage, regardless of payee. However, if the employer rate is less than the maximum allowed, the stipend may be paid in addition to but not in lieu of, provided that it at no time exceeds the maximum allowed under the grant ($10.00 / $13.00). If the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program only pays for work hours and not for required training stipends may be paid for those required and verified training hours.
          Except as noted above, youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, Career Awareness Activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities. Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category IV is limited to a maximum of 10 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
    2. Program Requirements
      Creating a path forward for these youth requires an approach that considers all aspects of the youth's realities and needs. For youth to be successful, there needs to be access to support that is comprehensive and coordinated, including addressing an array of basic needs such as housing, healthcare, childcare, transportation, legal support, and connection to the community.
      Services must also be developmentally appropriate and tailored to address the unique needs of the youth. Research on adolescent brain development finds that executive functioning and self-regulation skills are not fully developed until youth are in their mid-twenties. These are the critical skills that enable us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions, and juggle multiple tasks successfully. The brain needs this skill set to filter distractions, prioritize tasks, set and achieve goals, and control impulses. IYIP program models must consider these facts when designing how youth will be served in their programs. These youth have unique strengths and challenges that must be embraced as part of their preparation for career and employment opportunities. A developmentally appropriate approach will help to build the protective factors that foster resiliency and increase long-term success.
      While each program category varies as described above, all programs need to be designed to ensure that every youth served in the program is prepared for job placement and is supported as necessary to ensure they develop the capacity to maintain that employment.
      All programs will be designed to ensure that all youth complete the Career Cluster Inventory; the Employment 101 pre-assessment, work readiness activities, and post-assessment as necessary to demonstrate work readiness skills improvement; youth will be assessed and work to develop the their Essential Employability Skills; programs will ensure that each youth receives a Professional Workplace Skills Assessment to demonstrate the attainment of the Illinois Essential Employability Skills. Programs will also be designed to ensure youth receive, through assessment-based case management, Employment Support Services, Social Emotional Support Services, Life Skills Development, Educational Support Services, and for youth interested in long-term/career employment, programs will also be designed to assist youth in developing a Career Plan.
      1. Project Commitments
        Activities listed below apply to all program categories unless otherwise stated. Illinois Youth Investment Program applicants agree to meet all program requirements including requirements to:
        1. Recruit and secure partnerships with employers to place youth in jobs.
          • Recruit employers prepared to offer long-term employment opportunities. (Category II, III, & IV)
          • Recruit employers prepared to offer short-term employment opportunities. (Category I)
        2. Programs may provide wage subsidies for qualified employment. (Refer to Job Placements later in this section.)
        3. Programs may provide stipends for qualified industry-linked training programs (Category III & IV) (Refer to Job Placements later in this section.)
        4. Programs may provide stipends for qualified industry-linked training programs (Category III & IV) (Refer to Job Placements later in this section.)
        5. Prior to placement, and with restrictions, programs may provide stipends for certain non-workplace activities.
        6. No youth may receive a combined wage subsidy and/or stipend, for a period in excess of 12 months (52 weeks).
        7. All youth must register in Illinois workNet or other data system as directed by the Department.
        8. All subsidies and stipends paid will be disallowed if the youth was not fully enrolled in Illinois workNet on or before the date the subsidy/stipend was earned.
        9. Service provision for all youth served will be documented in Illinois workNet unless otherwise directed by the Department.
        10. Data will be collected, tracked and reported for all youth referred/served in the program. For a listing of required data elements please refer to Appendix J.
        11. Provide Work Readiness Activities/opportunities for youth. Youth may NOT receive a subsidized wage for participation in Work Readiness Activities, however stipends may be earned on a limited basis and with restrictions.
        12. Provide either employment placements, apprenticeship placements or Recognized Postsecondary Credential (industry-linked credential, certification or licensing) program placements as described herein for all enrolled youth.
        13. Have administrative and fiscal capacity to administer the program according to the Department's requirements.
        14. Conduct outreach to identify eligible youth participants and partner with local organizations for referrals to the program.
        15. Establish and maintain cooperative relationship with local IDHS Family & Community Resource Center (FCRC) offices in the service area to ensure eligible youth referred by FCRCs are enrolled in the program. This will include outreach to FCRCs to develop awareness of the Illinois Youth Investment Program, recruit potential participants, and regularly participating in local FCRCs' service provider meetings if requested.
        16. Establish proper eligibility documentation for each youth participant including a signed I9 prior to placing in employment. A file that includes the eligibility documentation must be maintained for each youth participant.
        17. Ensure that the youth targeted and served are reflective of the service area and the need presented. In the presence of gender, ethnic and/or racial disparity, the program must work to reduce that disparity.
        18. Ensure standardized youth assessments are completed as necessary to inform case plan.
        19. Reflect a trauma-informed approach, which involves understanding and responding to the symptoms of chronic interpersonal trauma and traumatic stress, as well as the behavioral and mental health consequences of trauma.
        20. The case plan shall address needs and barriers as necessary to maintain stable employment. (Examples include but are not limited to: transportation, child care, work attire, etc.)
        21. Ensure every enrolled participant acquires the Illinois Essential Employability Skills as demonstrated through a Worksite Professional Skills Assessment.
        22. Ensure every youth receives the Casey Life Skills Assessment.
        23. Ensure the case plan addresses needs identified in the Casey Life Skills Assessment. Skill areas include:

          Daily Living

          1.  Food/Nutrition
          2. Home Cleanliness
          3. Home Safety
          4. Home Repairs
          5. Computer Basics
          6. Permanency

          Relationships & Communications

          1. Personal Development
          2. Developing Relationships
          3. Communication
          4. Cultural Competency
          5. Domestic Violence
          6. Legal Permanency

          Permanent Connections

          1. Conflict resolution/anger management skills
          2. Decision making skills
          3. Mental health, substance use and trauma concerns
          4. Family stability & family responsibilities
          5. Personal safety and health

          Housing & Money Management

          1. Budgeting/Spending
          2. Banking/Credit
          3. Housing
          4. Transportation

          Self Care

          1. Health
          2. Personal Benefits
          3. Personal Hygiene
          4. Personal Safety
          5. Sexuality

          Work & Study Life

          1. Personal Development
          2. Study Skills
          3. Time Management
          4. Employment
          5. Legal
          6. Income Tax
          7. Personal safety and health
        24. Provide assistance to youth in securing eligible State and Federal benefits. Non-FCRC referred youth 18 and older should be encouraged/assisted to apply through ABE to determine potential benefit eligibility.
        25. Develop an assessment-based individualized case plan for the youth with the involvement of the youth (and family where appropriate) that incorporates at a minimum: Skill Development; Employment Support Services; Social-Emotional Support Services; Life-Skills Development; and Educational Support Services.
        26. Develop an individualized Career Plan for each youth that incorporates both short and long-term educational and employment goals necessary to achieving sustained employment in a chosen career path. It will involve the youth and considers an inventory of the youth's skills, talents and interests. (Category II, III & IV)
        27. Document assessments utilized in the Illinois workNet system.
        28. Document case plan activities and results in the youth's file and in the Illinois workNet system.
        29. Ensure employers provide an adequate level of supervision and a quality work opportunity related to seventeen career clusters.
        30. A file must be maintained for each worksite and must include among other items, the signed worksite agreement for the worksite location and copies of any participant employment termination forms (Appendix H). Signed worksite agreements for unsubsidized employment are strongly encouraged but not required. (See Section B Employer Agreements below.)
        31. Perform background checks on any individual that may have an opportunity to be alone with the youth. This will include program staff, mentors, job coaches, etc. A file that includes the results of the background checks and subsequent determination must be maintained for each individual. Youth should not be placed at a jobsite if the employer does not have an adequate policy for conducting background checks and cannot provide such assurances.
        32. Provide supportive services to facilitate a positive attendance record.
        33. Provide supportive services as necessary to ensure youth are working toward a high school diploma / GED.
        34. Employers will document youth attendance through time sheets.
        35. Provide oversight of the program through the monitoring of employment and the continuous assessment of program activities and outcomes.
        36. Provide timely reports as required or requested.
        37. Track and report all required data elements on the timeline dictated by the Department.
        38. Meet minimum performance measures/standards.
        39. Ensure representation at mandatory program meetings and trainings convened by or on behalf of the Department.
        40. Receive consultation and technical assistance from authorized Department representatives. The provider and collaborating partners will be required to be in attendance at site visits as required by Department staff.
        41. Ensure adequate internal controls and supporting documentation to ensure the accountability and appropriateness of all grant expenditures.
        42. All youth applications must be entered in Illinois workNet unless otherwise directed by the Department.
        43. Completed application will be reviewed and verified for eligibility. Verified applications will be signed by the participant and case manager.
        44. All career exploration and work readiness activities must be aligned with the nationally recognized career clusters or groups of occupations and industries.
        45. Category IV Specific Activities:
          • Partner with a Community College.
          • Assess the employment barriers of local youth who are unemployed and at-risk
          • Work cooperatively with local economic development organizations to identify the unmet skill needs of one or more local industries
          • Work cooperatively with local employers and/or Industry Association from those industries to design and deliver training programs for unemployed at-risk youth that will assist the targeted industries in meeting skill shortages
          • Design program to ensure placement of youth who have successfully completed the training program into jobs in the targeted industries.
      2. Employer Agreements
        All subsidized youth employment opportunities must have signed Employer Agreements. Signatures are encouraged but not required for unsubsidized employment agreements.
        • Each agreement must contain, at a minimum, the following items for each subsidized worksite included in the agreement:
          • Worksite contact and mailing information;
          • Detailed information on the worksite such as location, working days and hours, activities, job titles, job descriptions, and number of positions under each;
          • Worksite supervisor information;
          • Background check policies and assurances;
          • A detailed set of mutual terms, conditions, promises, and payments that the grantee and contractor have agreed upon;
          • When the employment is fully or partially subsidized, the written agreement must delineate the conditions and terms of successful probationary employment, thereby ensuring that when these terms & conditions are met, the youth's employment may continue under the employer unsubsidized;
          • A listing of participants for each worksite along with their projected start.
          • Commitment on the part of the employer to provide long term employment opportunities and not just subsidized employment; (excludes Category I, although encouraged)
          • Commitment on the part of the employer to provide weekly documentation (including signed timesheets) to the provider to verify hours worked etc. for each youth employed along with other attendance information and concerns;
          • Commitment on the part of the employer to complete Worksite Evaluations/Workplace Skills Assessments for each participant upon an agreed to schedule.
          • Commitment on the part of the employer to complete employment termination report (Appendix H) if participant employment ends during the period of subsidized employment or within 3 months following the youth's period of subsidized for those youth that continue unsubsidized.
          • Commitment on the part of the employer to provide employment verification and status information for program youth to the provider upon request up to 9 months following the youth's period of subsidized employment for those youth that continue unsubsidized.
        • Grantees must ensure that worksites for youth adhere to current workplace safety guidelines.
        • Grantees must ensure that worksites for youth adhere to applicable federal/state wage, labor, and workers' compensation laws.
          Employer agreements for unsubsidized employment will incorporate the above requirements whenever possible.
      3. Background Checks
        The applicant must ensure background checks are completed for any staff or volunteer that may come into contact with a minor youth AND for all staff involved in direct service provision for any program youth. The policy should include procedures for interpreting and making employment decisions based on the results. All supervisors of youth at worksites subsidized under this program must pass a background check conducted prior to being allowed to supervise any youth. Background checks are an allowable expense as a condition of employment for program staff.
      4. Job Placements (Category I)
        The primary objective is to place youth in short-term Summer Work Experience (minimum 180 hours) that will enable the youth to gain work experience, explore potential Career Pathways and develop the Essential Employability Skills.
        When the youth's wage is being subsidized by the grant, the provider may assume the role of employer of record for the employed youth and process a payroll request every two weeks during this subsidized period if this is formally agreed to in writing by both the employer and provider and the job meets all of the following criteria:
        • The job being subsidized meets the definitional criteria herein as an actual "Work Experience".
        • The position may be a full or part-time work experience
        • The work experience is for a minimum 180 hours.
        • The position is at an official job site of the employer (exceptions must be pre-approved by IDHS in writing).
        • The position has a corresponding job description.
        • The youth MUST be paid a legal wage; however, it is not necessary for that wage to be subsidized by the grant.
        • The youth's wage is at least minimum wage.
        • The subsidy or stipend does not exceed the maximum allowed under the grant for the employment area.
        • The youth's immediate supervisor is employed by the employer and not the provider unless the provider is the employer.
          IYIP participants may be employed directly by the Grantee under the following conditions:
        • The job being subsidized meets the definitional criteria herein as an actual "Work Experience" and meets all above criteria.
        • The position is at an official job site of the grantee (exceptions must be pre-approved by IDHS in writing).
        • The maximum number of youths that may be employed at the Grantee agency is 10.
      5. Job Placements (Category II, III & IV)
        The primary objective is to place youth in long-term unsubsidized employment/career employment. This grant and the subsidies/stipends it provides are not intended to create jobs. Since the subsidy is temporary and the expectation is that youth job placements will be long-term, it is essential that any job placements are not dependent on the subsidy.
        When the youth's wage is being temporarily subsidized by the grant, the provider may assume the role of employer of record for the employed youth and process a payroll request every two weeks during this subsidized period if this is formally agreed to in writing by both the employer and provider and the job meets all of the following criteria:
        • The job being subsidized is an actual full or part-time job.
        • The position is at an official job site of the employer.
        • The position is a formal position, with a corresponding job description, within the employer organization.
        • The youth's wage is at least minimum wage.
        • The subsidy / stipend does not exceed the maximum allowed under the grant for the employment area.
        • The youth's immediate supervisor is employed by the employer and not the provider.
        • If applicable, the written agreement between the provider and the employer will detail the transition of "employer of record" to the employer immediately following the subsidized period of
          employment.
        • The written agreement should further delineate the conditions and terms of successful probationary employment, thereby ensuring that when these terms & conditions are met, the youth's employment may continue under the employer alone.
          Youth IYIP participants may be employed directly by the Grantee under the following conditions:
        • The job is an actual full or part-time job that is anticipated to extend beyond the grant period.
        • The position is a formal position, with a corresponding job description, within the Grantee's organization.
        • The youth's wage is at least minimum wage.
        • The youth's wage is not subsidized by IYIP funds.
        • The youth may continue to receive other services required by the grant program.
      6. Youth Payroll & Timesheets
        The Grantee must submit payroll documentation, including stipends, to the Department using Illinois workNet, or other data system as directed by the Department, including hourly wage and the employer's FICA and workers' compensation that is attributed to the participant. Standardized employer timesheets must be used. The Grantee must also maintain in the file the signed timesheet to support the grant expenditures for each participant. Timesheets will be reviewed onsite by IDHS and will to be electronically maintained in the Illinois workNet System as directed by the Department.
        When recording payroll information in the Illinois workNet, the Grantee will be required to document the applicable minimum wage and ensure that the youth's hourly wage is not less than the applicable minimum wage and that the subsidized portion, if any, does not exceed the maximum allowed under the grant for the employment area.
      7. Reporting
        The Grantee's financial management system shall be structured to provide for accurate, current and complete disclosure of the financial results of the Project funded under this grant program. The general ledger must support costs and revenue reported to the Department and must allow tracing of funds to a level of expenditure adequate to ensure funds have been expended appropriately.
        Grantees are required to submit financial reports to IDHS as prescribed by the Department. Grantees' submittal of required reports allows DHS to monitor the Grantees' progress toward grant defined goals and their due diligence in grant fiscal management and recordkeeping. Further, Grantees will be required to relate financial data to performance accomplishments in their reporting (2 CFR 200.301).
      8. Participant File
        Each youth participant must have his or her own file and it must be kept securely. It is required to have a minimum of the following in each participant file:
        • Application signed by participant and IYIP grantee agency
        • Proof of eligibility - risk
        • Proof of Illinois residency
        • Completed I9 Form http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-9.pdf
        • Employer information
        • Employment information
        • Document verification of subsidized youth wage or stipend, FICA, Workers' Comp, signed timesheets, etc.
        • Checklist showing completion of required activities
        • Standardized assessment results used for case planning.
        • Case Plan and supporting documentation of service delivery
        • Copies of any termination of employment reports (Appendix H)
      9. Records and Retention / Destruction
        In accordance with the Community Services Agreement, each provider shall maintain full and complete records of program operations in compliance with state records retention requirements. Records are defined as those documents that capture program activity, participant information and outcomes, and fiscal data. IYIP providers shall comply with the Local Records Act, which regulates the destruction and preservation of public records within the State of Illinois. IDHS may require longer retention of records and/or submission of such records to the Department if the records cover a time period still open to audit.
      10. Employment Placements - Service Area
        While the Department's preference is for youth to be placed in jobs within the state of Illinois, for programs operating near an Illinois border with a neighboring state, it is acceptable to place youth in jobs at worksites in the neighboring state within a reasonable distance. However, it is the responsibility of the Grantee to ensure that any such job placements are in compliance with all local, state, and federal laws which may be applicable to the jurisdiction in which the placement is made.
      11. Illinois workNet Tools
        The following is a sample of tools available through the Illinois workNet that are available at no cost:
        • IYIP Application
        • Career Cluster Inventory
        • Employment 101 Curriculum
          • Pre-assessment
          • Educational Activities
          • Post-assessment
        • Individualized Services, Training, and Employment Plan (ISTEP) - In collaboration with individual youth participants, providers will utilize assessment data to develop a comprehensive college and career plan that will address each participant's short term and long-term goals for employment. The provider will use ISTEP to document the following:
          • prior work history
          • prior education, training, and credentials
          • realistic immediate and long-term education and employment goals
          • immediate and long-term steps necessary to achieve education and employment goals.
          • immediate and long-term barriers to achieving education and employment goals.
          • resources and strategies available to help overcome barriers to achieving education and employment goals.
          • plan for maintaining independent sustainable progress toward achieving employment goals after transitioning out of the Illinois Youth Investment Program
    3. IYIP Performance Measures and Standards
      1. Performance Measures
        • Category I
          1. Proposed vs. Actual youth served
          2. % of youth placed in a Paid Work Experience or a Pre-Apprenticeship Program
          3. % of youth placed within 1 month (30 days) of enrollment
          4. % of youth completing a Paid Work Experience (minimum 180 hours).
          5. % of youth completing a Pre-Apprenticeship Program.
          6. % of youth completing a Pre-Apprenticeship Program that has an application pending or has been accepted into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program
        • Category II
          1. Proposed vs. Actual youth served
          2. % of youth placed in employment or a Youth Apprenticeship program
          3. % of youth placed within 3 months (90 days) of enrollment
          4. % of youth completing a Youth Apprenticeship Program
          5. % of youth completing a Youth Apprenticeship Program that are: hired into entry-level employment in a targeted field; accepted into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program; or accepted into other Articulated Postsecondary Education.
          6. % of youth in unsubsidized long-term employment following program completion.
        • Category III
          1. Proposed vs. Actual youth served
          2. % of youth placed in a Registered Apprenticeship, Non-Registered Apprenticeship, and Recognized Postsecondary Credential program (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses).
          3. % of youth placed within 3 months (90 days) of enrollment
          4. % of youth acquiring one or more Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses).
          5. % of youth completing or continuing in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program at case closure.
          6. % of youth employed in a targeted industry at case closure.
        • Category IV
          1. Proposed vs. actual NEW Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities established.
          2. # of NEW Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities established within four (4) months of the grant start date.
          3. Proposed vs. Actual youth served
          4. % of youth placed in a NEW Registered Apprenticeship, NEW Non-Registered Apprenticeship, a NEW Youth Apprenticeship, or a NEW Recognized Postsecondary Credential program (Industry-Linked Credential, Certification, or Licensing program).
          5. % of youth placed within 3 months (90 days) of enrollment
          6. % of youth acquiring one or more Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses).
          7. % of youth completing a Youth Apprenticeship Program
          8. % of youth completing a Youth Apprenticeship Program that are: hired into entry-level employment in a targeted field; accepted into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program; or accepted into other Articulated Postsecondary Education.
          9. % of youth completing or continuing in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program at case closure.
          10. % of youth employed in a targeted industry at case closure.
      2. Performance Standards
        • Category I
          1. 100% of proposed youth will be served in the program. Acceptable performance 90%
          2. 100% of youth will be placed in a Paid Work Experience or a Pre-Apprenticeship Program. Acceptable performance 90%.
          3. 100% of youth will be placed within 1 month (30 days) of enrollment. Acceptable performance 70%.
          4. 100% of youth placed in a Paid Work Experience (minimum 180 hours) will complete that Work Experience. Acceptable performance 70%.
          5. 100% of youth placed in a Pre-Apprenticeship Program will complete that Pre-Apprenticeship Program. Acceptable performance 80%.
          6. 100% of youth completing a Pre-Apprenticeship Program will either: have an application pending or have been accepted into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program. Acceptable performance 85%.
        • Category II
          1. 100% of proposed youth will be served in the program. Acceptable performance 90%
          2. 100% of youth will be placed in employment and/or a Youth Apprenticeship program. Acceptable performance 90%.
          3. 100% of youth placed within 3 months (90 days) of enrollment. Acceptable performance 70%.
          4. 100% of youth placed in a Youth Apprenticeship Program will complete the program. Acceptable performance 70%.
          5. 100% of youth completing a Youth Apprenticeship Program will be either: hired into entry-level employment in a targeted field; accepted into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program; or accepted into other Articulated Postsecondary Education. Acceptable performance is 65%.
          6. 100% of placed youth in employment will continue in unsubsidized long-term employment at case closure. Acceptable performance 65%. (Excluded youth placed in a Youth Apprenticeship Program.)
        • Category III
          1. 100% of proposed youth will be served in the program. Acceptable performance 90%
          2. 100% of youth will be placed in either a Registered Apprenticeship, Non-Registered Apprenticeship, or Recognized Postsecondary Credential program (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses). Acceptable performance 90%.
          3. 100% of youth will be placed within 3 months (90 days) of enrollment. Acceptable performance 70%.
          4. 100% of youth placed in a Recognized Postsecondary Credential program (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses) will acquire a Credential, Certification or License. Acceptable performance 65%.
          5. 100% of youth placed in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program will have either completed the program by case closure or will be continuing the program at case closure. Acceptable performance 65%.
          6. 100% of placed youth will be employed in a targeted industry at case closure. Acceptable performance 65%. ("Placed" youth includes all youth "Placed" in #2 herein. Measure excludes youth Continuing in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program at case closure.)
        • Category IV
          1. 100% of proposed NEW Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities will be established. Acceptable Performance 90%.
          2. 100% of proposed NEW Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities will be established within four (4) months of the grant start date. Acceptable performance one (1).
          3. 100% of proposed youth will be served in the program. Acceptable performance 90%
          4. 100% of youth placed in a NEW Registered Apprenticeship, NEW Non-Registered Apprenticeship, a NEW Youth Apprenticeship, or a NEW Recognized Postsecondary Credential program (Industry-Linked Credential, Certification, or Licensing program). Acceptable performance 90%.
          5. 100% of youth will be placed within 3 months (90 days) of enrollment. Acceptable performance 70%.
          6. 100% of youth placed in a Recognized Postsecondary Credential program (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses) will acquire a Credential, Certification or License. Acceptable performance 65%.
          7. 100% of youth placed in a Youth Apprenticeship Program will complete the program. Acceptable performance 70%.
          8. 100% of youth completing a Youth Apprenticeship Program will be either: hired into entry-level employment in a targeted field; accepted into a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program; or accepted into other Articulated Postsecondary Education. Acceptable performance is 65%.
          9. 100% of youth placed will be completing or continuing in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program at case closure. Acceptable performance 65%.
          10. 100% of placed youth will be employed in a targeted industry at case closure. Acceptable performance 65%. ("Placed" youth includes all youth "Placed" in #4 herein. Measure excludes all youth Continuing in a Registered or Non-Registered Apprenticeship Program or other Articulated Postsecondary Education at case closure.)
    4. Definitions
      • Articulated Post-Secondary Education
        Ensures that students receive credit for comparable coursework without unnecessary repetition when transferring from one institution or program to another
      • Career Development Experience
        A supervised work experience relating to an individual's career area of interest that:
        • Occurs in a workplace or under other authentic working conditions;
        • Is co-developed by at least one employer in the relevant field and a service provider and/or an education provider;
        • Provides compensation or educational credit to the participant; Reinforces foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework; and
        • Includes a Professional Skills Assessment that assesses skill development and is utilized as a participant feedback tool.
          Career Development Experiences may include any of the following, provided the experience meets the definitional criteria: internship, school-based enterprise, supervised agricultural experience, student-led enterprise, or youth apprenticeship. Career Education/Illinois Pathways
      • Career Education/Illinois Pathways
        Career education includes training that expands the student's understanding and awareness of career clusters and pathways. Projects will be tied to the courses, work-based learning activities, and credentials/assessments outlined in the Illinois pathways initiative. The objective of these strategies is to provide youth with a structured pathway related to their academic or career interests, as well as resources to fully engage students in their learning and enable them to successfully transition into postsecondary education programs and the workforce.
      • Career Exploration
        Learning about various occupations and their "fit" with an individual's unique career preferences
      • Certificate
        An official document attesting to certain standards in the areas of curriculum for example: Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and Assistant Behavioral Analyst (ABA)
      • Credential
        Document verifying the attainment of academic, educational or certain occupational qualifications and competence for example: high school diploma, GED, Registered Nurse (RN) and Registered Dietitian (RD)
      • Incumbent Worker Training
        A program that helps employers develop and implement training programs for new or current employees who need intensive services in order to retain employment
      • Industry Credential
        A work-related credential, certification, or license that:
        • Verifies, through a valid assessment, an individual's qualifications or competence in a specific skillset related to a particular industry or occupation;
        • Is issued by an industry-related organization or state licensing body with the relevant authority to issue such credentials; and
        • Is broadly sought or accepted by employers as a recognized, preferred, or required credential for recruitment, screening, hiring, retention, or advancement purposes.
      • In-School Youth
        In-School youth are those youth actively pursuing their high school diploma, equivalent or are enrolled at least half-time in post-secondary education including technical education.
      • Internship
        An opportunity offered by an employer to potential employees, called interns, to work for the employer for a fixed period of time
        • Can be paid or voluntary
        • Provides practical experience in an occupation or profession
      • License
        A permit from an authority to own or operate something, do a particular thing, or carry on a trade
      • Long-term Employment -An employment position that is not temporary in nature. A position that, should the youth successfully complete a probationary period, the youth would continue to work indefinitely. Sustained employment.
      • Non-Registered Apprenticeship
        An apprenticeship that is not registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, but that meets all Registered Apprenticeship criteria other than application for registration
      • On-the-Job Training
        A hands-on method of teaching the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed for employees to perform a specific job within the workplace and to face the challenges that occur during the performance of the job
        • Uses existing workplace tools, machines, documents, & equipment
        • Takes place within the employee's normal job environment
        • May occur as the employee performs their actual work
        • Usually conducted by a supervisor or a co-worker/mentor
      • Out-of-School Youth
        Out-of-School youth are those youth that have already acquired their high school diploma or equivalent and do not meet In-School criteria.
      • Pre-Apprenticeship Program
        A program that has a documented partnership with an employer and is designed to prepare individuals to enter and succeed in a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship which includes all the following:
        • Training and curriculum that aligns with the skill needs of employers in the region and that has been designed to prepare participants to meet the minimum entry-level requirements of the Apprenticeship.
        • Access to educational and career counseling, and other supportive services as needed by participants.
        • Hands-on meaningful learning activities that are connected to education and training activities, such as Career Exploration and Career Development Experiences, and that reinforce foundational professional skills including, at a minimum, those outlined in the Essential Employability Skills framework.
        • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program and may receive preference for enrollment.
      • Recognized Postsecondary Credential
        A Recognized Postsecondary Credential is defined as a credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State involved or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree, as well as graduate degrees for purposes of the VR program as required by section 103(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by title IV of WIOA. A recognized postsecondary credential is awarded in recognition of an individual's attainment of measurable technical or industry/occupational skills necessary to obtain employment or advance within an industry/occupation. These technical or industry/occupational skills generally are based on standards developed or endorsed by employers or industry associations.
      • Registered Apprenticeship
        A program of the United States Department of Labor that connects job seekers looking to learn new skills with employers looking for qualified workers; it is a proven centuries-old model for effective skilled workforce development
        • A registration package must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Labor to develop and register an apprenticeship program
        • Components that make up a registered apprenticeship are
          • Employer ownership
          • Structured on-the-job learning
          • Related technical instruction
          • Rewards for skill gains
          • National occupational credential
        • Registered apprenticeship programs qualify for state-based tax credits and have access to resources from federal programs to help reduce cost and support apprentices
        • The program provides a pipeline of skilled workers enrolled in customized programs that meet a variety of the employer's needs
        • Enrolled apprentices receive a paycheck that is guaranteed to increase as their training and skill levels increase
        • Apprentices complete a combination of industry-specific classroom education and hands-on career training leading to nationally recognized, portable Certificates of Completion.
      • School-based Enterprise
        A supervised entrepreneurial operation usually in a school setting, that provides goods/services to meet the needs of the market and are managed and operated by students/youth
        • Provide realistic and practical learning experiences that reinforce classroom instruction
        • Help to prepare students for the transition from school to work or college
        • Goods may include spirit wear, food and beverages, school supplies, and more
        • Services may include creative design, advertising sales, and more
      • Service Learning
        An educational approach that combines learning objectives with community service to provide a pragmatic, progressive learning experience while meeting societal needs
        • involves students in a wide range of experiences, which often benefit others and the community, while also advancing the goals of a given curriculum
      • Supervised Agricultural Experience
        A planned, practical activity that helps a student develop skills, competencies, and experience in a career area of the student's choice and should be designed to implement specific agricultural and academic knowledge and skills learned in the classroom
        • There are four types of supervised agricultural experience programs
          • Exploratory - allows a student to have a wide range of experiences to learn more about career opportunities or the agricultural industry in general and may involve job shadowing
          • Entrepreneurship - involves personally owning all or part of an enterprise in agriculture, the student has an ownership interest in the materials and supplies or is the sole owner or has an ownership share
          • Placement - involves gaining work experience and competencies in an agricultural business by working for another person or company
          • Research/experimentation - a science-based experience that may involve using a science laboratory or an environmental site for study
      • Transitional Jobs
        Time-limited subsidized work experiences that help individuals who are chronically unemployed and have barriers to employment establish a work history and develop skills to access unsubsidized employment and progress in the workplace
      • Work-Based Learning
        Work-based learning provides participants with work- based opportunities to practice and enhance the skills and knowledge gained in their program of study or industry training program, as well as to develop employability, and includes an assessment and recognition of acquired knowledge and skills. Examples include: internships, service learning, paid work experience, on-the-job training, incumbent worker training, transitional jobs, and apprenticeships.
      • Youth Apprenticeship - A program for youth (ages 16 to 24) currently enrolled in secondary education or pursuing a high school equivalency, including those with disabilities, that include, at minimum, the following:
        • Programs must include a documented partnership with an employer.
        • 450 hours of paid on-the-job training
        • At least 2 semesters of related instruction that ideally counts towards a high school and/or postsecondary credential, but minimally leading to an Industry Credential;
        • Ongoing and a final assessment measuring success in mastering skill standards;
        • Career exploration where participants learn about several positions within the employer and the field; and
        • Wraparound supports (e.g. case management and counseling) and holistic upskilling (e.g. technical skills and soft skills).
        • Upon successful completion of the program, participants are supported to apply for one or more of the following: entry-level employment, admission to a Registered Apprenticeship or Non-Registered Apprenticeship program, or admission to other articulated postsecondary education options (including 2- and 4-year programs).
      • Youth-led Enterprise
        A supervised entrepreneurship that integrates practices of positive youth development with community engagement to enable mutual transformation of economies, neighborhoods, and individuals
        • Youth-designed, youth-led business or community social initiative that is supported within a framework of intergenerational participation
        • Promotes the overall development of adolescents through initiatives that increase their creative and skillful vision to gain financial stability while caring for their communities
        • Includes activities to promote social and emotional learning, develop business and financial skills, engage entrepreneurial and design thinking
  2. Funding Information
    1. This is a competitive funding opportunity.
    2. The release of this NOFO does not obligate the Illinois Department of Human Services to make an award. Work cannot begin until a contract is fully executed by the Department.
    3. In FY2021 the Department anticipates the availability of approximately $17 Million in funding available for grants under this Competitive Funding Notice.
    4. The Department anticipates funding approximately 25 to 50 applicants to provide the Illinois Youth Investment Program.
    5. Funding for this award will come from the State's General Revenue Fund and does NOT have a match requirement.
    6. These General Revenue funds are used by the Department as TANF Maintenance of Effort. This means that for provider purposes, these funds will be considered Federal in nature and will carry a 15% cap on Indirect costs. Further, these grant dollars may not be used by the provider to match other federal grant awards.
    7. Subject to appropriation, the grant period will begin on August 1, 2020 and will continue through June 30, 2021.
    8. Successful applicants under this funding notice may be eligible to receive up to two (2) subsequent one-year grant awards for this program.
    9. Proposed project budgets and narratives must be sufficiently detailed and justified to be approved by IDHS. Successful applicants will NOT receive a grant agreement until after their budget has been approved through the CSA system. Refer to Appendix O for additional instructions for registering and completing budgets in the CSA system.
    10. Subcontractor Agreement(s) and budgets must be pre-approved by the Department and on file with the Department. Subcontractors are subject to all provisions of this Agreement. The successful Applicant Agency shall retain sole responsibility for the performance of the subcontractor. Subcontractor budgets are not entered in CSA, forms can be found via link listed in Appendix O.
    11. Pre-Award costs will be allowed under the following conditions: 1.) the applicant must have received and accepted the Notice of State Award (NOSA) AND, 2.) Submitted any and all requested program plan and budget revisions per the NOSA; AND 3.) May NOT incur pre-award costs prior to acceptance of the NOSA.
    12. All funding is subject to sufficient appropriations.
  3. Eligibility Information & Grant Funding Requirements
    1. Eligible Applicants
      This competitive Funding Notice, for the Illinois Youth Investment Program, is limited to those public or private not-for-profit community-based agencies, Illinois units of local government, Illinois public school districts and/or Illinois Community Colleges as specified below who meet all of the Pre-Qualification and Mandatory Requirements described in this section. Failure to provide the requested information as outlined in this NOFO to demonstrate these criteria are met will result in the application being removed from funding consideration. Note: It is NOT necessary for applicants to have previously held a Community Youth Employment Grant by IDHS to be eligible.
      Category I, II and Category III: To be eligible for a grant under Category I, II and Category III, the applicant must be a non-profit community-based organization in Illinois, an Illinois unit of local government, or an Illinois public school district that has a history of providing direct services to at-risk youth. Prefer an organization with experience providing youth employment services.
      Category IV: To be eligible for a grant under Category IV, the applicant must be a non-profit community-based organization in Illinois, an Illinois unit of local government, an Illinois public school district, or an Illinois Community College that has a history of directly providing job training services. Prefer an organization that also has experience providing direct services to at-risk-youth.
    2. Pre-Qualification
      Applicant entities will not be eligible to apply for a grant award until they have pre-qualified through the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA) Grantee Portal, www.grants.illinois.gov Grantee Links tab. Registration and pre-qualification are required annually. During pre-qualification, verifications are performed including a check of federal Debarred and Suspended status on the Illinois Stop Payment List and good standing with the Secretary of State. An automated email notification is sent to the entity alerting them of "qualified" status or providing information about how to remediate a negative verification (e.g., inactive DUNS, not in good standing with the Secretary of State). A federal Debarred and Suspended status cannot be remediated. Applicants must be pre-qualified, therefore, applications from entities that have not completed the GATA pre-qualification process prior to the due date of this application will NOT be reviewed and will NOT be considered for funding. A statement indicating the applicant has completed Pre-Qualification steps and is currently Pre-Qualified will be required with the application. (A screenshot indicating the applicant has completed Pre-Qualification steps and is currently Pre-Qualified will also be accepted).
      The Provider's proposed budget must be entered into the CSA system. The completed budget must be electronically signed and submitted in the CSA system, and a printed copy of the signed and submitted budget must be included with the application. To do this, the following is required: at a minimum, the applicant agency's Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or equivalent, or the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) or equivalent must be registered in the CSA system to electronically sign the required budget documents prior to submission. Budgets not submitted as described here and by the due date and time will not be considered.
      For more information about submitting a budget in the CSA system, refer to Appendix O and also see: http://www.dhs.state.il.us/OneNetLibrary/27896/documents/GATA_2020Grants/GATA2020links/IDHSBudgetTrainingManual_Revision032719.pdf 
    3. Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)
      Each applicant is required to:
      1. Be registered in SAM before submitting the application. The following link provides a connection for SAM registration: https://www.sam.gov/SAM/;
      2. provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and
      3. continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times in which the applicant has an active Federal, Federal pass-through or State award or an application or plan under consideration by a Federal or State awarding agency.
        IDHS may not make a Federal pass-through or State award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time IDHS is ready to make the award, DHS may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive the award and use that determination as a basis for making the award to another applicant.
    4. Unique entity identifier and System for Award Management (SAM)
      Each applicant is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active award or an application or plan under consideration by the Department.
      The Department may not make an award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Department is ready to make an award, the Department may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making an award to another applicant. Please refer to Section C. Eligibility Information & Grant Funding Requirements for additional information and detail regarding SAM.
    5. Pre-Award Requirements
      The pre-award process includes a financial and administrative risk assessment utilizing an Internal Controls Questionnaire (ICQ) and a Programmatic Risk Assessment (PRA). The PRA must be completed for each separate grant for which an applicant intends to apply. The Department may NOT issue a Notice of Award or a Grant Agreement to any applicant that does not have a submitted and approved FY21 ICQ and a submitted and complete FY21 PRA for the Illinois Youth Investment program. While these are NOT required prior to submitting the application, they are required prior to the Department issuing an award.
      Applicants that have not completed an FY21 ICQ and/or an FY21 PRA at the time of application will be contacted by the Department to complete these Pre-Award requirements.
      These grantee pre-award requirements are mandated by Federal Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200) and the Grant Accountability and Transparency Act (GATA). Grantees must complete these requirements prior to receiving a grant award from the State of Illinois.
    6. Mandatory Requirements of Applicant
      The Mandatory Requirements are essential items that must be met by the Applicant. If any Mandatory Requirement is not met, the responding Applicant's entire proposal will not be considered. If all responding applicants fail to meet a particular mandatory requirement, that mandatory requirement may, at the sole discretion of the State, be removed from the Mandatory Requirements so the evaluation process may continue. However, this does not obligate IDHS to make an award to any applicant that fails to meet all mandatory requirements.
      1. Have the capacity to assume the role of employer of record for the employed youth and process a payroll request every two weeks of the program period if the youth's wage is being temporarily subsidized by the grant.
      2. Have the administrative and fiscal capacity to implement the program on a reimbursement basis.
      3. Have current systems in place to identify eligible underserved populations of youth, and
      4. Have strong established employer relationships and methods to recruit employers.
      5. Have the technological and staff capacity to document service provision as required, including capturing all required youth participation data in the Illinois workNet System.
      6. Meet all reporting requirements of the grant both programmatic and financial.
      7. For applicants proposing to address Category I - If the selected provider proposed a Summer 2020 program, the provider must be able to begin providing services in August 2020. Note: Applications will be accepted/considered that chose to forego Summer 2020 and elect to begin programming Summer 2021. Those selected providers will be expected to begin Summer programming in May/June 2021. For applicants proposing to address Categories II and III - The selected provider must be able to begin providing services 60 days followings the contract start date. For applicants proposing to address Category IV - The selected provider must be able to begin providing new services within 120 days followings the contract start date.
      8. Technology: Agencies awarded funds through this funding notice must have a computer that meets the following minimum specifications for the purpose of utilizing the required IDHS web-based reporting system (Illinois workNet) and the receipt/submission of electronic program and fiscal information:
        • Internet access, preferably high-speed
        • Email capability
        • Microsoft Excel
        • Microsoft Word
        • Adobe Reader
      9. State and Federal Laws and Regulations: The agency awarded funds through this NOFO must agree to comply with all applicable provisions of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to nondiscrimination, sexual harassment and equal employment opportunity including, but not limited to: The Illinois Human Rights Act (775 ILCS 5/1-101 et seq.), The Public Works Employment Discrimination Act (775 ILCS 10/1 et seq.), The United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) (42 USC 2000a-and 2000H-6), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 USC 794), The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 USC 12101 et seq.), and The Age Discrimination Act (42 USC 6101 et seq.).
    7. Cost Sharing or Match Requirements
      Providers are NOT required to provide in-kind and/or financial match
    8. Grant funds - Use Requirements
      All applicants will use grant funds according to the guidelines, conditions and parameters set forth in this funding notice and in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and the terms and conditions of any applicable federal awards.
      Please refer to 2 CFR 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, PART 200 Subpart E - Cost Principles to determine the appropriateness of costs.
      1. Allowable costs:
        Allowable costs are those that are necessary and reasonable based on the activity(ies) contained in the Scope of Work, are justified in the Budget Narrative, and are allowable under Subpart E of 2 CFR 200. Funding allocated under these grants is intended to provide direct services to youth. It is expected that administrative costs, both direct and indirect, will represent a small portion of the overall program budget. Any budget deemed to include inappropriate or excessive administrative costs will not be approved. Program budgets and narratives must detail how all proposed expenditures are necessary for program implementation.
        The following guidelines apply to specific allowable costs:
        1. Youth Wages/Stipends
          While it is preferred that youth are placed directly in unsubsidized employment, it is allowable, through an agreement with the employer, to fully or partially subsidize the youth's wage as described under each separate category below.
          A stipend is payment made to an IYIP youth participant during his/her enrollment to encourage the youth to participate in certain activities (seat/participation time payments). The stipend can be used for activities such as training, education and classroom instruction. A stipend payment may also be tied to work readiness activities, employability skills development, and life skills development goals as identified in the youth's case plan. Stipends may not exceed the maximum per hour amount allowed under the grant. Stipends may be paid based on actual hours of attendance/participation. Attendance in the activity must be documented as the basis of stipend payments. Justification of need must be documented in the youth's file.
          The calculation of the time limitation in each category only includes periods during which the youth is earning a subsidized wage or a stipend. The limitation is a limitation per participant, not per placement. For example, if a youth's subsidized job placement ends after 8 weeks, and the youth receives a new subsidized job placement, the overall length of available wage subsidy/stipend is reduced by 8 weeks. Youth wages and stipends may not exceed the total allowed under the program category for which the youth is enrolled. While a youth may be enrolled in one category multiple times and may be enrolled in in multiple program categories at different times, no youth may receive subsidized wages or stipends for a combined period in excess of 12 months (52 weeks). Programs that are able to off-set the wage subsidies / stipends with other funds or have the capacity to provide unsubsidized opportunities or step down, or partial subsidies will be able to stretch funding to allow for additional youth to be served in the program.
          NOTE: If the full subsidy/stipend has been utilized for an individual youth, that youth will no longer be eligible for any additional wage subsidy or stipend - even if they re-enroll in the program at the same provider or another provider agency at a later time. This youth will, however, continue to be eligible for all other services in a current or subsequent enrollment.
          1. Category I - Short-term, Summer Employment
            (Work-based Learning; Career Development Experience; and Pre-Apprenticeship programs)
            Wages may be subsidized by the grant for work experience only. This will include employment, work experience, internships, on-the-job training, transitional jobs, apprenticeships, and supervised school-based and youth-led enterprise. Youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, assessments, case management activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities.
            Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category I is limited to a maximum of 5 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
            Wage subsidies/stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Youth must be paid at least the applicable minimum wage for the jurisdiction in which the youth is employed, and the grant may not provide a wage subsidy or stipend in excess of $10.00 per hour or $13.00 per hour for employment within the City of Chicago. Full and Part-time wages may be subsidized in whole or in part with grant funding up to 3 months (13 weeks) per enrolled youth. The calculation of the 3-month limitation only includes periods during which the youth is earning a full or partial subsidized wage and periods in which a youth is earning a stipend. The 3-month limitation is a limitation per participant, not per placement and considers both stipends and subsidies paid. For example, if a youth's subsidized job placement ends after 9 weeks, and the youth receives a new subsidized job placement, the new job placement may only be subsidized for 4 weeks. Programs that are able to off-set the wage subsidies with other funds or have the capacity to provide unsubsidized opportunities, step down, or partial subsidies will be able to stretch funding to allow for additional youth to be served in the program.
          2. Category II - Targeted Long-term Employment
            (Targeted long-term employment and Youth Apprenticeship programs)
            Wages may be fully or partially subsidized by the grant for the hours worked for both long-term employment and the required minimum 450 on-the-job training hours worked for the Youth Apprenticeship Program. Further, stipends may be paid for the 2 semesters of related instruction that counts toward a high-school and/or postsecondary credential and/or an industry Credential as part of the Youth Apprenticeship program. Should a youth participate in a Career Development Experience, the grant may be used to fully or partially subsidize a wage or to pay a stipend provided the Experience meets the minimal definition criteria above. In total, the wage subsidies and/or stipends in Category II may not exceed a period of 9 months (39 weeks) per youth.
            Note: As a general rule, the employer pays the wage for an Apprenticeship program. In this case, grant funds would only be used to pay stipends. Further, stipends may not be paid for the same hour for which a youth is earning a wage, regardless of payee.
            Except as noted above, youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, Career Awareness Activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities. Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category II is limited to a maximum of 10 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
            Wage subsidies / stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers compensation. Youth must be paid at least the applicable minimum wage for the jurisdiction in which the youth is employed, and the grant may not provide a wage subsidy or stipend in excess of $10.00 per hour or $13.00 per hour for employment within the City of Chicago. Full and Part-time wages may be subsidized in whole or in part with grant funding up to 9 months (39 weeks) per enrolled youth. The calculation of the 9-month limitation only includes periods during which the youth is earning a full or partial subsidized wage and/or a stipend. The 9-month limitation is a limitation per participant, not per placement and considers both stipends and subsidies paid. For example, if a youth's subsidized job placement ends after 10 weeks, and the youth receives a new subsidized job placement, the new job placement may only be subsidized for 29 weeks. Programs that are able to off-set the wage subsidies with other funds or have the capacity to provide unsubsidized opportunities, step
            down, or partial subsidies will be able to stretch funding to allow for additional youth to be served in the program.
          3. Category III - Career Development - Industry-linked Long-term Employment
            (Registered Apprenticeship; Non-Registered Apprenticeship; and Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses))

            During participation in the Apprenticeship / Credential training program, youth may receive a weekly stipend not to exceed the equivalent of $10.00 per hour of required training or $13.00 per hour within the City of Chicago. Stipends may only be paid for those training hours required by the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program that are completed and verified. Training stipends and subsidies may not exceed a total period of 12 months (52 weeks).
            Wage subsidies / stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Training stipends will include FICA and workers' compensation as necessary. As a rule, the employer pays the wage for an Apprenticeship program. In this case, grant funds would only be used to pay stipends. In situations where an established training program already pays a wage or stipend for participation in or completion of the training program, the grant may NOT be used to offset or replace this subsidy. Further, stipends may not be paid for the same hour for which a youth is earning a wage, regardless of payee. However, if the employer rate is less than the maximum allowed, the stipend may be paid in addition to but not in lieu of, provided that it at no time exceeds the maximum allowed under the grant ($10.00 / $13.00). If the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program only pays for work hours and not for required training stipends may be paid for those required and verified training hours.
            Except as noted above, youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, Career Awareness Activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities. Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category III is limited to a maximum of 10 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
          4. Category IV - Expansion of Industry-Linked Career Development Opportunities
            (Registered Apprenticeships; Non-Registered Apprenticeships; and Recognized Postsecondary Credentials (Industry-Linked Credentials, Certifications, or Licenses))
            Grant funding may be used to support coordination activities, research, curriculum development, curriculum and training materials development, and other reasonable and necessary costs associated with the development and establishment of these new training programs.
            During participation in the Apprenticeship / Credential training program, youth may receive a weekly stipend not to exceed the equivalent of $10.00 per hour of required training or $13.00 per hour within the City of Chicago. Stipends may only be paid for those training hours required by the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program that are completed and verified. Training stipends and subsidies may not exceed a total period of 12 months (52 weeks).
            Wage subsidies / stipends in this category will include compensation for services rendered limited to youth wages and benefits to include FICA and workers' compensation. Training stipends will include FICA and workers compensation as necessary. As a rule, the employer pays the wage for an Apprenticeship program. In this case, grant funds would only be used to pay stipends. In situations where an established training program already pays a wage or stipend for participation in or completion of the training program, the grant may NOT be used to offset or replace this subsidy. Further, stipends may not be paid for the same hour for which a youth is earning a wage, regardless of payee. However, if the employer rate is less than the maximum allowed, the stipend may be paid in addition to but not in lieu of, provided that it at no time exceeds the maximum allowed under the grant ($10.00 / $13.00). If the Apprenticeship / Credentialing program only pays for work hours and not for required training stipends may be paid for those required and verified training hours.
            Except as noted above, youth may not receive subsidized wages for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, Career Awareness Activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities. Although it is discouraged, youth may receive a stipend for participation in employment readiness activities, Career Exploration activities, and non-workplace training and skill development activities connected to case plan goals, however, stipends for these non-workplace activities in Category IV is limited to a maximum of 10 weeks and may only be earned prior to a worksite placement. Note: These stipends, will count toward the maximum subsidy/stipend allowed.
        2. Program Services
          Program services includes the delivery of services related to youth employment and career development activities identified in the Required & Optional Programming subsections of Section A, Program Description, for each separate program Category. This includes but is not limited to employment readiness activities and supports, occupational learning and exploration, employer coordination and recruitment, assessment, case management, workplace skill development; employment support services; social-emotional support services; life-skills development; educational support services and career plan development and youth supportive services that may include transportation, child care (refer to the Child Care Assistance Program guidelines) work-related attire, physicals, and background checks, and an array of additional services identified through an individualized assessment.
          Providers funded under Category IV will also be able to use grant funding to support coordination activities, focus groups, surveys, research, curriculum development, curriculum and training materials development, and other reasonable and necessary costs associated with the development and establishment of eligible new training programs.
      2. Unallowable costs
        Please refer to 2 CFR 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, PART 200 Subpart E - Cost Principles to determine the appropriateness of costs. In addition, and specific to this grant, the following costs will be unallowable without specific prior written approval from IDHS:
          1. Entertainment costs, except where specific costs that might otherwise be considered entertainment have a programmatic purpose and are authorized in the approved budget (2 CFR 200.438)
          2. Capital expenditures for general purpose equipment, including any vehicle regardless of cost, buildings, and land (2 CFR 200.439)
          3. Capital expenditures for improvements to land, buildings, or equipment which materially increase their value or useful life (2 CFR 200.439)
          4. Food, and other goods or services for personal use of the grantee's employees, contractors, or consultants of the grantee unless authorized as per diem under the State of Illinois Governor's Travel Control Board (2 CFR 200.445).
          5. Deposits for items, services, or space
            • The following guidelines apply to specific unallowable costs:
        • Youth Wages/Stipends
          • Wage subsidies, and stipends may not be paid by the grant in excess of the maximum allowed $10.00 per hour ($13.00 in Chicago)
          • Youth may not receive subsidized wages/stipends for participation in non-workplace activities such as employment readiness activities, assessments, case management activities, non-workplace training and skill development activities unless specifically authorized above in Section C8a Allowable Costs above or special written permission is sought and granted.
          • Youth wages and stipends may not exceed the total allowed under the program category for which the youth is enrolled. While a youth may be enrolled in one category multiple times and may be enrolled in in multiple program categories at different times, no youth may receive subsidized wages or stipends (combined) for a period in excess of 12 months (52 weeks).
      3. Limitation of Use of Award funds for Employee Compensation: With respect to any award over $250,000, recipients may not use federal funds to pay total cash compensation to any employee that exceeds 110% of the maximum annual salary payable to a member of the Federal Government's Senior Executive Service (SES) at an agency with a Certified SES Performance Appraisal System for that year. A salary table is available at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management website https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversight/pay-leave/salaries-wages/salary-tables/pdf/2020/ES.pdf
      4. Indirect cost requirements
        In order to charge indirect costs to this grant, the applicant organization must have a Federal or State annually negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) or must elect to use the De Minimis Rate.
        Every organization that receives an FY2021 state award must make an indirect cost rate proposal or election in the Crowe Activity Review System (CARS), including organizations that are choosing not to claim payment for indirect costs.
        CARS URL: https://solutions.crowehorwath.com/CARS/StateofIllinoisGOMB/Login.aspx 
        Indirect Cost Rate Election:
        1. Federally Negotiated Rate. Organizations that receive direct federal funding may have an indirect cost rate that was negotiated with the Federal Cognizant Agency. Illinois will accept the federally negotiated rate. The organization must provide a copy of the federal NICRA as Attachment 11.
        2. State Negotiated Rate. The organization must negotiate an indirect cost rate with the State of Illinois by completing an indirect cost rate proposal in the CARS system if they do not have Federally Negotiated Rate or elect to use the De Minimis Rate.
        3. De Minimis Rate. An organization that has never received a Federal or State Negotiated Rate may elect a de Minimis rate of 10% of modified total direct cost (MTDC). Once established, the de Minimis rate may be used indefinitely. The State of Illinois must verify the calculation of the MTDC annually in order to accept the de Minimis rate. If programs elect to use the De Minimis rate, it is critical that program budgets accurately calculate the MTDC base. Please see the regulation below and note the exclusions to MTDC.
          2 CFR § 200.68 Modified Total Direct Cost (MTDC).
          MTDC means all direct salaries and wages, applicable fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, and subawards and subcontracts up to the first $25,000 of each subaward or subcontract (regardless of the period of performance of the subawards and subcontracts under the award). MTDC excludes equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs, tuition remission, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs and the portion of each subaward and subcontract in excess of $25,000. Other items may only be excluded when necessary to avoid a serious inequity in the distribution of indirect costs, and with the approval of the cognizant agency for indirect costs.
      5. "No Rate": Grantees have discretion not to claim payment for indirect costs. Grantees that elect not to claim indirect costs cannot be reimbursed for indirect costs. The organization must record an election of "No Indirect Costs" into CARS.
        Crowe Activity Review System (CARS).
        CARS will allow your organization to document your already established federally approved indirect cost rate, complete an indirect cost rate proposal (see State Negotiated Rate above), elect to charge the De Minimis rate (10%) of modified total direct costs (MTDC), or select that no reimbursement of indirect costs will be requested. Submission requirements are located on page 2 of the Uniform Budget Template as well as 2 CFR 200 Appendices IV, V & VII.
        1. Organizations which have not previously made an indirect cost rate election must submit an election (and indirect cost rate proposal, if necessary) immediately and no later than 3 months after receiving an award notification or invitation to the CARS system.
        2. Organizations that have previously established an indirect cost rate election must submit a new indirect cost rate election immediately and no later than 6 months after the close of their organization's fiscal year.
        3. Every organization must make an indirect cost rate election in CARS even if the organization is choosing De Minimis Rate or "no rate". Organizations that do not make an election or submission inside the CARS system within the required timeframes will not be allowed to claim indirect cost reimbursement.
        4. For more information, see https://www.illinois.gov/sites/GATA/Pages/default.aspx.
      6. Administrative costs
        It is expected that administrative costs, both direct and indirect, will represent a small portion of the overall program budget. Program budgets and narratives will detail how all proposed expenditures are directly necessary for program implementation and will distinguish between Indirect/Direct Administrative and Direct Program expenses. Any budget deemed to include inappropriate or excessive administrative costs will not be approved. At no time may the approved NICRA be exceeded under this agreement. Documentation will be required to verify the approved NICRA.
      7. Simplified Acquisition Threshold
        Potential grantees under this funding announcement may receive an award in excess of the Simplified Acquisition Threshold, currently $250,000 (Refer to 2CFR200 Section 200.88). Therefore, the grantee must be aware of the following regarding the Simplified Acquisition Threshold as it will be applicable to any qualifying sub award:
        • That the grantee agency, prior to making a sub-award with a total amount of funds greater than the simplified acquisition threshold, is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the designated integrity and performance system accessible through SAM (currently FAPIIS) (see 41 U.S.C. 2313);
        • That an applicant, at its option, may review information in the designated integrity and performance systems accessible through SAM and comment on any information about itself that the awarding agency previously entered and is currently in the designated integrity and performance system accessible through SAM;
        • That the awarding agency will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in the designated integrity and performance system, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in §200.205 awarding agency review of risk posed by applicants.
    9. Additional Requirements
      1. Applicants must commit to becoming trauma-informed as recognized through a Department recognized/accepted assessment tool. For example, the CBAT-O Assessment tool. Applicants will demonstrate an ongoing commitment to developing/maintaining trauma informed capacity within the organization. Training and technical assistance will be made available to successful applicants to achieve/maintain this status.
      2. Applicants agree to provide Illinois Youth Investment Program services as described throughout this Funding Notice.
      3. Collaboration with local Family and Community Resource Centers (FCRCs): Providers will maintain a collaborative working relationship with the local IDHS FCRCs. This will include outreach to FCRCs to develop awareness of the Illinois Youth Investment program, recruit potential participants, and participating in local FCRCs' service provider meetings as requested.
      4. Program Evaluation Reporting Requirements: Providers will be required to participate in evaluation efforts as directed by the Department and/or its subcontractor(s) and collect and report data accordingly. All Providers are required to utilize the Illinois workNet web-based system for reporting service provision data as required on all youth served. Providers will be required to report quarterly regarding program performance measures and outcomes. Providers will be required to participate in a Department directed Performance and Standards Assessment reviews. A year-end program and performance measures and outcomes report will also be required. Additional data and information may be requested throughout the year as determined by the Department
      5. Training and Technical Assistance: Programs must agree to receive consultation and technical assistance from authorized representatives of the Department. The program and collaborating partners will be required to be in attendance at site visits. Programs will be required to attend regular meetings and training as provided by the Department or a subcontractor of the Department and should budget accordingly (at least quarterly).
      6. Sectarian Issue: Provider organizations may not expend federal or state funds for sectarian instruction, worship, prayer or to proselytize. If the Provider organization is a faith-based or a religious organization that offers such activities, these activities shall be voluntary for the individuals receiving services and offered separately from the program.
      7. Background Checks: Background checks are required for all program staff and volunteers who have the potential for contact with youth under 18. These background checks must be completed in advance of individuals working directly with youth. Such individuals will authorize such checks in writing and submit to fingerprinting when required. The agency shall retain the signed form authorizing the background check. All background check information, including the signed authorizing forms shall be maintained separately in a confidential file, apart from the employee's personnel records. Funded programs will be required to have a written protocol in place detailing the requirement for background checks; evidence of their completion; the protocol for reviewing and making determinations regarding results; etc. In no case shall a Person who has been indicated as the perpetrator of any of the child abuse/neglect allegations identified in 89 Ill. Adm. Code Section 385.50(a) be deemed fit for service that allows access to children.
      8. Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting Mandate: Per the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act (ANCRA, 325 ILCS 5/4), mandated reporters are professionals who may work with children in the course of their professional duties. Mandated reporters are required to report suspected child maltreatment immediately when they have "reasonable cause to believe that a child known to them in their professional or official capacity may be an abused or neglected child" (ANCRA Sec.4). This is done by calling the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) Hotline at 1-800-252-2873 or 1-800-25ABUSE. Programs funded through this grant opportunity must review ANCRA and, where appropriate, have a written protocol for identifying and reporting suspected child maltreatment.
      9. Hiring and Employment Policy: It is the policy of the Department to encourage cultural diversity in the work environment and to promote employment opportunities through its programs. The Department philosophy is that the program workforce should appropriately reflect the populations to be served, with special attention given to hiring individuals indigenous to those communities. Consistent with Department policy, whenever a position becomes available, funded programs are encouraged to consider TANF clients for employment, contingent upon their qualifications in the areas of education and work experience.
    10. Other Requirements:
      The Applicant Agency must demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of positive youth development concepts.
  4. Application and Submission Information
    1. Address to Request Application Package.
      Application materials are provided throughout this announcement. Appendices will be made available in user/printer friendly format and may be found on the Illinois Department of Human Services web site at this link. Additional copies may be obtained by contacting the contact person listed below.
      Each applicant must have access to the internet. The Department's web site will contain information regarding the NOFO and materials necessary for submission. Questions and answers will also be posted on the Department's website as described later in this announcement. It is the responsibility of each applicant to monitor that web site and comply with any instructions or requirements relating to the NOFO.

      Contact Person

      Brandon Bax, Program Administrator
      IDHS, Division of Family & Community Services
      Bureau of Youth Intervention Services
      823 East Monroe
      Springfield, Illinois 62701
      DHS.YouthServicesInfo@illinois.gov
      Phone: 217-524-7441
    2. Content and Form of Application Submission.
      1. Uniform Application for State Grant Assistance
        Applicants must submit a completed and signed Uniform Application for State Grant Assistance. Click Here (pdf) or refer to Appendix N.
      2. Proposal Narrative Content
        Applicants must submit a proposal narrative that contains the information outlined below. Each section must have a heading that corresponds to the headings listed below. The total narrative may not exceed 20 pages, single-spaced, using 12-point Times New Roman font, with 1-inch margins. If the application is for multiple program categories, an additional 5 pages will be allowed per category. Example: Application for Categories 1,2 &3. Maximum # of pages: 20 + 5 + 5 = Max 30 pages. The Uniform Application for State Grant Assistance, required attachments, letters of intent, and Uniform Grant Budget are not included in the page limitation. If the applicant believes that a subject has been adequately addressed in another part of the application narrative, then a cross-reference to the appropriate part of the narrative must be provided. The narrative portion must follow the page maximums where prescribed and must be organized in the format outlined below. If an applicant receives an award through this Notice of Funding Opportunity, the proposal will become the local program plan and budget unless revisions are required. The application/plan will be the basis for monitoring compliance by IDHS.
        Applications will be accepted to address a single program Category. Applications will be accepted to address more than one program Category. Multiple applications from a single Provider will NOT be accepted UNLESS, each separate application is intended to serve youth in different Counties.

        Applications for one or more program Categories, must be organized by program Category. The requested information under each section below MUST be preceded by the corresponding Category heading unless otherwise directed.
        Applicants must submit an application that contains the information outlined below:
        1. Executive Summary - 10 Points
          The Executive Summary will serve multiple purposes. First, as a scored portion of this application and secondly, for successful applicants it will serve as a stand-alone document that may be shared with various state-level stakeholders and others requesting a brief overview of each funded project. Therefore, applicants should be concise and direct in their description. At a minimum, each of the following should be addressed in the Executive Summary:
          1. Applicant's Name
          2. Name of the proposed project
          3. Brief description of the Service Area
          4. Highlights of the Identified Need and Description of the target population (Indicate any differences by program Category)
          5. Total amount of funds requested through this grant (include separate amounts for each program Category and total as appropriate)
          6. Projected number of youth to be served. (Include separate counts for each program Category and a total. In addition, indicate the number of youth, if any, that are expected to be served under multiple Categories.)
          7. Estimated cost per youth. (Include separate amounts for each program Category and overall cost per youth if multiple Categories). (Total grant divided by total youth served.) For youth to be served across multiple Categories, in addition to the single Category projections, separately indicate projected average costs for those youth.
          8. Brief description of the overall program model and implementation design (If multiple, describe each by Category and explain how each Category fits into the overall model.)
          9. Identification of project partners (service providers, employers, Industry Associations, Local Workforce Areas, Community Colleges etc.) and their roles/responsibilities. (by Category as appropriate)
            In addition to the above, Appendix M - Executive Summary, must be completed and included as Attachment 1 of the application.
        2. Capacity - Agency Qualifications and Organizational Capacity - 30 Points
          Present an accurate picture of the agency's ability to implement a youth employment and career education/employment program that will meet the requirements of this Funding Notice and will lead to expected youth outcomes. (For applications to serve youth under multiple program Categories, this section does NOT need to be separated by Category, rather, as relevant, include additional information as it would specifically apply to different program Categories.)
          Information in this section should include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following:
          1. Convincing evidence that the applicant agency is capable of carrying out all components of the proposed program.
          2. Description of the experience that your agency has in conducting employment programs for at-risk youth. Include data to support the successes and outcomes of the program(s) as well as the employment outcomes of the youth served. Describe other relevant major accomplishments of your organization serving this at-risk population of youth.
          3. If the program intends to offer subsidized employment opportunities, provide information regarding your agency's capacity and experience in managing a participant payroll system - particularly for youth employment programs if applicable.
          4. An organizational chart of the applicant organization, showing where the program and its staff will be placed including subcontractors if used. If subcontractors will be used, include the relationship with those organizations in the chart. Please include this as Attachment 2.
          5. Identify any key staff positions that will be responsible for the program. Describe their relevant experience and expertise in the areas of youth employment and youth services. Describe how these key staff will be reflective of the population of youth being targeted for services. Include evidence that your agency maintains adequate staff coverage and supervision to meet the requirements of the grant. Present the résumés of the Project Manager/Coordinator, Agency Director, Fiscal Manager and Payroll Coordinator (if applicable) as Attachment 3 of your proposal.
          6. Job descriptions for all employee positions that will be funded in whole or in part with this grant, and an indication of the percent of time or hours those employees will spend in this program. Programs must recruit and hire staff that are qualified for the positions through education, experience, and/or training. Employee positions should be reflective of the community and the population of youth to be served. Include job descriptions as Attachment 4.
          7. A description of your agency's current programs and activities relevant to the services described in this Notice of Funding Opportunity. Please describe if and how these programs will impact the youth targeted and enrolled in your IYIP program.
          8. Describe how and provide assurances that IYIP monies will not supplant existing funds or services.
          9. A description of your agency's readiness for service provision. Category I Programs proposing a Summer 2020 program will begin enrolling youth on August 1, 2020. Summer 21 programs will begin enrolling youth in May/June 2021. Category II & III programs will begin enrolling youth within 1 month (30 days) of grant start. Category IV Programs are expected to place the initial group of youth into new training programs in December 2020 (4 months from grant start). Youth should be enrolled into Category IV programs 1 to 3 months prior.  Category I: Programs will begin placing youth in employment within 30 days of enrollment into the program. Category II, III & IV: Programs will begin placing youth within 90 days of enrollment into the program. Include an implementation timeline as Attachment 5. (Include a separate timeline for each program Category)
          10. A description of existing employment partnerships your agency has in place to offer work experience and job placement opportunities, apprenticeships, etc. Describe if and how these existing partnerships will impact IYIP youth.
          11. Category IV Applicants Only: Describe the applicant's experience working with local economic development organizations, local employers, Industry Associations, Local Workforce Areas, Community Colleges, other education organizations, etc. to assess, design and deliver training programs for youth that will assist the targeted industries in meeting skill shortages. Provide examples and describe models and successes.
          12. Describe any financial resources that have been secured to off-set the costs associated with youth wages or other activities for the proposed program.
          13. Identify other youth employment or similar State, Federal, or Foundation grants for which you have applied or intend to apply, if any. Describe how you anticipate the award of such grants to compliment this proposal.
          14. Provide a description of existing service provider partnerships your agency has to other community resources and services essential to the positive development of youth related to this program, including procedures to ensure provision of services to youth. Include copies of signed, current or expected agreements in Attachment 6 of your application. These agreements or letters of commitment must delineate the partner's responsibilities and commitments to the project - letters of "support" will NOT be considered.
          15. Describe your policy and procedure for conducting background checks within your organization.
          16. Indicate of the applicant agency is considered "trauma-informed".
            1. If yes, describe the trauma-informed principles adopted by the agency (For example, Safety, Strength-based, Supportive environment, etc.)-include agency mission statement if applicable and describe the process and standards by which the agency became trauma-informed.
            2. If the agency is not considered "trauma-informed", the agency must provide a statement of its intent to begin working toward this goal during the grant period. (The Department will offer assessment, technical assistance and training etc. free to successful applicants.)
          17. Describe the plan for monitoring subcontracted providers and assuring they are meeting the program service requirements, timelines and financial requirements (if applicable).
          18. Include as Attachment 7 the Program Contact Information Form found in Appendix D.
          19. Include as Attachment 8 the Subcontractor Contact Information Form(s) found in Appendix E. Include as Attachment 8a the Subcontractor Information Form(s) found in Appendix E. Also include as Attachment 8b copies of corresponding subcontracts.
          20. Include as Attachment 9 the Program Placement/Work Site Information Form found in Appendix G.
          21. Include as Attachment 10 the Service Delivery Site Information Form found in Appendix F.
          22. Include as Attachment 13 a copy of the Applicant's current Federal Form W-9.
          23. Any additional information that the applicant feels might be relevant to a reviewer in determining the agency's ability to carry out a quality program should be included
        3. Need - Description of Need - 10 Points
          The purpose of this section is for the applicant to provide a clear and accurate picture of the need for these services within the targeted community and how the proposed project will address these needs. It is understood that the need for these services is statewide and this Notice of Funding Opportunity is intended to identify and fund applicants to serve communities with the greatest identified need in the target population in areas throughout the State. As described in this Funding Notice, and as indicated in Appendix B, significant disparities exist with regards to youth of color and geography. The Department intends to apply an equity lens in the geographic distribution of awards throughout the state. Please describe how your program will work to mitigate these disparities. It is necessary for the applicant to demonstrate that it has a thorough knowledge and understanding of the needs of these youth in the specific service area targeted by this application.
          Provide a description of your targeted county/community/service area. Include data to support your description. Examples include: Youth population (16-24 if possible); poverty, unemployment, under-employment; HS graduation rates, drop-out rates; truancy/expulsion; educational attainment levels; violence/crime statistics; homelessness (youth); teen pregnancy rates; substance use/abuse; gang involvement/activity etc.
          Describe how the eligible youth population will be targeted for services based on the identified need. Identify if the data presented suggests that certain gender, racial or ethnic populations are over-represented within these negative data elements. Describe the Outreach Plan that will be implemented to ensure that the youth targeted and ultimately enrolled into the program will in fact be representative of that disparity.
        4. Quality - Description of Program Design and Services - 40 Points
          The purpose of this section is for the applicant to provide a detailed, clear and accurate picture of its intended program design. For those applicants applying to serve youth in multiple program Categories, it will be necessary to provide Items A-J separately by program Category.
          1. Identify the program Category
          2. Service Area Description
          3. Description of the target population
          4. Identify the projected number of youth to be served and anticipated demographics based on the population targeted. Include: Ethnicity; Race; Gender and Age (16-17; 18-20; 21-24)
          5. Estimated cost per youth. (Grant amount requested divided by total youth served.)
          6. Identification of project partners (service providers, employers, Industry Associations, Local Workforce Areas, Community Colleges, other education organizations, etc.) and their roles/responsibilities.
            Category IV applications that are able to demonstrate a planned partnership with a Community College actively participating in the ICCB Equity Initiative will receive 5 priority points.
          7. Describe in detail the overall program design, methodology, activities, processes; steps, etc. that clearly reflects implementation/operationalization of the Required Program Components identified in Section A4. Describe how the program design will ensure a holistic and developmentally appropriate approach to serving youth. Demonstrates how the Objectives and Performance Measures will be achieved through the design of the program.
          8. Describe in detail how the proposed program will ensure implement EACH of the Program Requirements identified in Section A2, Program Requirements.
          9. Describe in detail the plan, if any, to offer wage subsidies/stipends to youth for eligible activities. Describe how the applicant organization plans to ensure that wage subsidies / stipends meet the necessary criteria identified in this Funding Notice and that both individual youth and program Category limitations are not exceeded. Describe systems in place/to be put in place to ensure youth are paid timely and that appropriate documentation is uploaded to the Illinois workNet system as directed by the Department.
          10. Provide a walkthrough of services etc., with timeline, of the "typical" youth to be served in this Category. Include everything from initial recruitment and referral of the youth to case closure, and everything in between. Include the expected outcomes for the youth.
          11. If multiple Categories are applied for, provide the overall picture of how the various program Categories will complement each other. Indicate the number of youths that are expected to be served under multiple Categories. Describe the reasoning behind this plan. Indicate an assurance of the understanding that no individual youth may receive a subsidized wage and/or stipend (combined) in excess of 12 months.
          12. Past Performance - Provide a brief summary of the recent performance and outcomes achieved (past 3 years) operating similar employment programs for transition-age youth.
          13. Describe the plan for monitoring worksites (site visits, phone contact, reports, etc. - include frequency).
          14. Complete the Program Category Placement Summary Form(s) found in Appendix I and include it as Attachment 11 of the application.
        5. Evaluation (2 Pages Maximum) - 5 Points
          1. Applicants must include a clear statement indicating that the agency has or will have within the first month of the grant period a sufficient number of computers with internet service for grantee staff and program participants to access the Illinois workNet.
          2. Applicants must include a clear statement indicating their ability to collect participant data and report it via the Illinois workNet.
          3. Describe in detail the capacity and the plan to track, evaluate and report performance measures.
          4. Describe how the program will ensure the capacity to collect, track and regularly report the data elements identified in Appendix J.
          5. Applicants must make a clear statement of their intention to participate in any formal evaluation of the program that may be conducted by the Department or any of its contractors.
        6. Budget Narrative (3 Pages Maximum) - 5 Points
          In this section of the application narrative, provide a detailed Budget Narrative of the items allocated within your proposed budget. This will include all funds budgeted for the program, including match if applicable. Detail how the specified resources and personnel are being allocated to ensure the tasks, activities, goals and objectives described in your proposal will be implemented. Illustrate the use of state or federal funds, other than grant funds, that will be used to support the program. If sub-contractors are planned, please also describe how these funds will be utilized to implement the program. This narrative will include projected numbers of youth to be served and the corresponding average cost per youth served.
          If multiple program Categories are applied for, all requested information in this Budget Narrative section must be separated by program Category.
          Please restate and provide a response to each of the following questions as part of your FY21 Budget Narrative.
          Does your Agency maintain written procedures that minimize the time elapsing between the receipt and disbursement of grant funds?
          Does your Agency comply with/meet the financial management standards of 2 CFR 200.302?
          Does your Agency anticipate any immediate cash needs to implement this grant?
          Does your Agency have sufficient working capital to fully operate the grant program for 2 months beginning July 1, without advance payment, including initial startup costs and normal monthly grant expenses? 
          In addition to the above narrative, Applicants must complete and submit the Uniform Grant Budget in the CSA system. For more information about how to access the CSA system, click here  and/or reference Appendix O. For instructions about how to enter a budget into the CSA system, click here and/or reference Appendix O For EACH cost item listed in the budget worksheet, a detailed justification must be included in the narrative section. This justification should describe specifically how the budgeted amount was derived. The justification must also directly correlate the expenditure to the grant program - why/how it is necessary under the grant. Items being cost allocated must be fully detailed as to the method utilized. This narrative justification must also clearly identify indirect costs, direct program costs, direct administrative costs, and match within each line item as appropriate. The Budget (including MTDC base exclusions as appropriate) should clearly describe how the specified resources and personnel have been allocated for the tasks and activities described in your plan. The Budget and its narrative sections should be prepared to reflect a budget period from August 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021. The Budget should be electronically signed and submitted in the CSA system. The budget must be electronically signed by the applicant's Chief Executive Officer or Chief Financial Officer - only one electronic signature is required for budget submission. Click here and/or reference Appendix O for more information about requesting CSA budget signoff authority.
          If the Uniform Grant Budget is not entered, signed and submitted in the CSA system by the application due date and time, ZERO points will be awarded for the Budget Narrative.
          Please note that if you receive a grant award under this Notice of Funding Opportunity, your FY21 Uniform Grant Agreement will not be processed until your budget has been reviewed AND approved by IDHS. It is critical that the budget submitted with the application is as detailed as possible. It may be necessary to adjust your proposed budget.
          Subcontractor budgets must be pre-approved, and therefore must be submitted with this application as Attachment 12. Subcontractor budgets should not be submitted in the CSA system. Instead, Subcontractor budgets should be completed using the Uniform Budget Template which can be found here (docx) and/or reference Appendix O This PDF template should only be used for Subcontractor budgets. The Applicant's budget must be prepared in and printed from the CSA system. Subcontractor budgets must be signed by the Subcontractor's Chief Executive Officer or Chief Financial Officer.
        7. Attachments to the Application Narrative
          If any attachments are not applicable, a page labeled with the attachment number should be submitted and should include a statement explaining why the attachment was not applicable.
          • A 1 - Executive Summary
          • A 2 - Organizational chart
          • A 3 - Résumés of IYIP Project Manager/Coordinator, Agency Director, Fiscal Manager and Payroll Coordinator
          • A 4 - Job Descriptions
          • A 5 - Implementation Timeline (by Category)
          • A 6 - Service Provider Partner Agreements
          • A 7 - Program Contact Information Form
          • A 8 - Subcontractor Contact Information Form(s) (if applicable)
            • A 8a - Subcontractor Information Form(s) (if applicable)
            • A 8b - Copies of Subcontract(s) (if applicable)
          • A 9 - Program Employment/Worksite Information Form
          • A 10 - Service Delivery Site Information Form
          • A 11 - Program Category Placement Summary Form
          • A 12 - Subcontractor Budget(s) (if applicable)
          • A 13 - Applicant's Federal Form W-9
    3. Submission Dates and Times
      Submission Format, Location, and Deadline
      1. Applicants must electronically submit the complete application including all required narratives and attachments in the prescribed order. Applications must be received submitted electronically to DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov  no later than 12:00 p.m. (noon) on Wednesday, July 1st, 2020. The application container will be electronically time-stamped upon receipt. The Department will ONLY accept applications submitted by electronic mail sent to DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov. The electronic copy must be a complete single PDF file. Applications will NOT be accepted if received by fax machine, hard copy, disk or thumb drive.
        Applicants will receive an email within 48 hours of receipt notifying them that their application was received and if it was received by the due date and time. This email will be sent to the email address provided in the application. Applications received after the due date and time will not be considered for review or funding. Applicants are required to notify the Department by 12:00 PM on Tuesday, July 7th, 2020, if they did NOT receive an email notifying them that their application was received. If the applicant does not receive an email and does not notify the Department by Tuesday, July 7th, 2020 at noon, their application will be considered a late submission and will NOT be reviewed or scored. The applicant will NOT have the right to protest the submission/receipt of their application to the Department after Tuesday, July 7th, 2020 at noon. In the event of a dispute, the applicant bears the burden of proof that the application was received on time at the email location listed above.
      2. Complete applications must be electronically submitted to DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov. Application submissions or delivery to any other email address or contact, including other IDHS offices or employees, will not be considered for review or funding.
      3. The subject line must state: "21-444-80-2377 Brandon IYIP"
      4. All applicants are strongly encouraged to submit the completed grant application (single PDF document) to DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov utilizing the CMS File Transfer Utility located at https://filet.illinois.gov/filet/PIMupload.asp. This will ensure large documents are able to cross firewalls and will provide you with a transmission receipt. Please follow the instructions to attach your application. Don't forget the subject line above.
      5. To be considered, proposals must be submitted to DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov by the designated date and time listed above. For your records, please keep a copy of your submission with the date and time the application was submitted along with the email address to which it was sent. The deadline will be strictly enforced. 
    4. Other Submission Requirements
      1. Proposal Container and Format Requirements
        All applications must be typed on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper using 12-point type and at 100% magnification. With the exception of letterhead and stationery for letter(s) of support (not required), the entire proposal should be typed in black ink on white paper. The program narrative must be typed single-spaced, on one side of the page, with 1-inch margins on all sides. The program narrative must not exceed the page totals specified in the "Content and Form of Application Submission" section including the Executive Summary. Items included as Attachments are NOT included in the page limitations.
        The entire application, including attachments, must be sequentially page numbered and compiled in the order specified below.
        Applications will ONLY be accepted as described herein. Emailed copies, Faxed copies, etc. will not be accepted. The Department is under no obligation to review applications that do not comply with the above requirements.
      2. ALL Applications MUST include the following mandatory forms/attachments in the order identified below.
        All applications must include the following documents in the order identified below. All documents should be labeled and attachment labels should include the attachment number. If any attachments are not applicable, a page labeled with the attachment number should be submitted and should include a statement explaining why the attachment was not applicable.
        1. Uniform State Grant Application
        2. A statement indicating the applicant has completed Pre-Qualification steps and is currently Pre-Qualified. (A screenshot will also be accepted.)
        3. Proposal Narrative
          • Executive Summary
          • Capacity - Agency Qualifications/Organizational Capacity
          • Need - Description of Need
          • Quality - Description of Program Design and Services
          • Evaluation
          • Budget Narrative
          • Attachments to Your Application
            • A 1 - Executive Summary
            • A 2 - Organizational chart
            • A 3 - Résumés of IYIP Project Manager/Coordinator, Agency Director, Fiscal Manager and Payroll Coordinator
            • A 4 - Job Descriptions
            • A 5 - Implementation Timeline (by Category)
            • A 6 - Service Provider Partner Agreements
            • A 7 - Program Contact Information Form
            • A 8 - Subcontractor Contact Information Form(s) (if applicable)
              • A 8a - Subcontractor Information Form(s) (if applicable)
              • A 8b - Copies of Subcontract(s) (if applicable)
            • A 9 - Program Employment/Worksite Information Form
            • A 10 - Service Delivery Site Information Form
            • A 11 - Program Category Placement Summary Form
            • A 12 - Subcontractor Budget(s) (if applicable)
            • A 13 - Applicant's Federal Form W-9
        4. Uniform Grant Budget - The proposed budget must be entered, signed and submitted in CSA and is required for the application to be considered complete. A hard copy of this signed and submitted budget must be included with the application.
    5. Unique entity identifier and System for Award Management (SAM)
      Each applicant is required to: (i) Be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active award or an application or plan under consideration by the Department. The Department may not make an award to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the Department is ready to make an award, the Department may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making an award to another applicant. Please refer to Section C. Eligibility Information & Grant Funding Requirements for additional information and detail regarding SAM.
    6. Intergovernmental Review
      This funding opportunity is NOT subject to Executive Order 12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs,".
    7. Funding Restrictions
      The applicant must develop a budget consistent with program requirements as described in Section A. Program Description and in accordance with Section C. 8 Grant Funds Use Requirements.
      The Department will allow reimbursement of pre-award costs and services under this funding opportunity. Please refer to Section B.13 Funding Information, Pre-Award Costs.
  5. Application Review Information
    1. Criteria
      Applications that fail to meet the criteria described in Section C "Eligibility & Grant Funding Requirements" will not be scored and/or considered for funding.
      Review teams comprised of 3 individuals employed by IDHS serving in the Division of Family and Community Services will be assigned to review applications. These review teams, where possible will be comprised of staff within the Bureau of Youth Intervention Services and may include individuals working as Government Public Service Interns under contract from the University of Illinois at Springfield.
      Each application will first be reviewed and scored individually. Then, review team members will collectively review the application, their scores, and comments to ensure review team members have not missed items within the application that other review team members identified. Application highlights and concerns will be discussed. Individual review team members may choose to adjust scores to appropriately capture content that may have been missed initially. Scores will then be sent to the application Review Coordinator to be compiled and averaged to produce the single final application score. Scoring will be on a 100 point scale, with an additional 5 priority points available to Category IV eligible applications.
    2. Proposal Scoring
      Application Narratives will be evaluated on the following criteria:

      Executive Summary

      Capacity - Agency Qualification & Organizational Capacity

      Need - Description of Need

      Quality - Description of Program Design & Services

      Evaluation

      Budget Narrative

      SUB-TOTAL

      Priority Points Community College Partnership (ICCB Equity)

      TOTAL

      10 Points

      30 Points

      10 Points

      40 Points

      5  Points

      5  Points

      100 Points

      5 Points

      105 Points

      • If the Uniform Grant Budget is not entered, signed and submitted in the CSA system by the application due date and time, zero points will be awarded for the Budget Narrative.
    3. Review and Selection Process.
      As described in the Criteria section above, scoring will be done by committee on a 100-point scale, with an additional 5 priority points available to Category IV eligible applications. The numerical score may not be the sole award criterion. The Department reserves the right to consider other factors such as: the projected cost per youth; the state need to address geographical inequities; and the state and county need to address Racial/Ethnic disparities in employment, income, education, youth homelessness, youth poverty, violence data, and other relevant factors. In addition, the state may also consider the applicant agency's past performance as a state grantee, to include contract performance and financial compliance. The Department intends to ensure equity in the geographic distribution of awards throughout the state. While recommendations of the review panel will be a key factor in the funding decisions, the Department maintains final authority over funding decisions and considers the findings of the review panel to be non-binding recommendations. Any internal documentation used in scoring or awarding of grants shall not be considered public information.
      Final award decisions will be made by the Director of the Division of Family and Community Services at the recommendation of the Bureau Chief for the Bureau of Positive Youth Development and the Associate Director of the Office of Community & Positive Youth Development.
      The Department reserves the right to negotiate with successful applicants to adjust award amounts, service areas, service projections, service categories, # of youth to be served, etc.
      Note: Should the Department exercise its right to consider the state and county need to address Racial/Ethnic disparities in employment, income, education, youth homelessness, youth poverty, violence data, etc. The Department will utilize data identified in Appendix A, B and C.
    4. Merit-Based Evaluation Appeal Process.
      1. Competitive grant appeals are limited to the evaluation process. Evaluation scores may not be protested. Only the evaluation process is subject to appeal and shall be reviewed by IDHS' Appeal Review Officer (ARO).
      2. Submission of Appeal.
        1. An appeal must be submitted in writing to the grant contact listed in this Notice of Funding Opportunity, who will send to the ARO for consideration.
        2. An appeal must be received within 14 calendar days after the date that the grant award notice has been published.
        3. The written appeal shall include at a minimum the following:
          1. the name and address of the appealing party;
          2. identification of the grant; and
          3. a statement of reasons for the appeal.
      3. Response to Appeal.
        1. The IDHS will acknowledge receipt of an appeal within fourteen (14) calendar days from the date the appeal was received.
        2. IDHS will respond to the appeal within 60 days or supply a written explanation to the appealing party as to why additional time is required.
        3. The appealing party must supply any additional information requested by IDHS within the time period set in the request.
      4. Resolution
        1. The ARO shall make a recommendation to the Agency Head or designee as expeditiously as possible after receiving all relevant, requested information.
        2. In determining the appropriate recommendation, the ARO shall consider the integrity of the competitive grant process and the impact of the recommendation on the State Agency.
        3. The Agency will resolve the appeal by means of written determination.
        4. The determination shall include, but not be limited to:
          1. Review of the appeal;
          2. Appeal determination; and
          3. Rationale for the determination.
    5. Simplified Acquisition Threshold
      Potential grantees under this funding announcement may receive an award in excess of the Simplified Acquisition Threshold, currently $250,000 (Refer to 2CFR200 Section 200.88). Therefore, the grantee is subject to Simplified Acquisition Threshold. Refer to Section C. 8 Grant Funds Use Requirements.
  6. Award Administration Information
    1. State Award Notices
      Applicants receiving a grant award under this Notice of Funding Opportunity will receive a Notice of State Award (NOSA). The NOSA shall include:
      • The grant award amount
      • The terms and condition of the award.
      • Specific conditions assigned to the grantee based on the fiscal and administrative and programmatic risk assessments.
        Upon acceptance of the grant award, announcement of the grant award shall be published by the awarding agency to https://grants.Illinois.gov.
        A written Notice of Denial shall be sent to any applicants not receiving awards.
        The NOSA must be signed by the grants officer (or equivalent). This signature effectively accepts the state award and all conditions set forth within the notice. This signed NOSA is the authorizing document. The grantee-signed NOSA must be remitted to the Department as instructed in the notice.
    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements.
      The agency awarded funds shall provide services as set forth in the IDHS grant agreement and shall act in accordance with all state and federal statutes and administrative rules applicable to the provision of the services.
      To review a sample of the FY2021 DHS Uniform Grant Agreement, please visit the IDHS Website at http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=29741.
      The agency awarded funds through this Notice of Funding Opportunity must further agree to comply with all applicable provisions of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to nondiscrimination, sexual harassment and equal employment opportunity including, but not limited to: The Illinois Human Rights Act (775 ILCS 5/1-101 et seq.), The Public Works Employment Discrimination Act (775 ILCS 10/1 et seq.), The United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 (as amended) (42 USC 2000a-and 2000H-6), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 USC 794), The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 USC 12101 et seq.), and The Age Discrimination Act (42 USC 6101 et seq.). Additional terms and conditions may apply.
    3. Reporting
      1. The Provider will submit monthly expenditure documentation forms in the format prescribed by the Department. The Expenditure Documentation Forms must be submitted no later than the 30th of each month for the preceding month by email.
      2. Periodic Financial Reports will be submitted quarterly by email in a format prescribed by the Department, no later than the 30th day of the month immediately following the quarter for the preceding quarter.
      3. Periodic Performance Reports will be submitted quarterly by email in a format prescribed by the Department, no later than the 30th day of the month immediately following the quarter for the preceding quarter.
      4. Additional annual performance data may be collected as directed by the Department and in a format prescribed by the Department.
    4. Payment Determination
      1. Payment Determination
        1. Applicants identified as low risk on the ICQ: Applicants identified as low-risk will receive monthly advance payments. An initial 2/12 of the Award amount will be issued upon execution of the agreement; and may be rounded to the nearest $100.00. Subsequent payments will be issued, after reconciling all current and previously reported expenditures, ensuring the Applicant maintains a 1/12 rolling advance.
        2. Applicants identified as Medium to High Risk on the ICQ: An annual determination will be made regarding the need for a working capital advance. This determination will be made based on information submitted by the applicant as part of the FY21 Grant Application/Plan process. Applicants will be placed in one of the following payment categories:
          1. For applicants that indicate insufficient working capital to fully operate the grant program for 2 months beginning July 1, will receive an initial working capital advance payment of 2/12 of the Award amount upon execution of the agreement; and may be rounded to the nearest $100.00. Subsequent payments will be issued on a reimbursement basis and will consider all previously submitted and documented expenditures.
          2. For applicants that indicate sufficient working capital to fully operate the grant program for 2 months beginning July 1, grant payments will be issued on a reimbursement basis that will consider all previously submitted and documented expenditures.
      2. The Department will compare, as applicable, the amount of the initial advance/working capital payment made to date with the documented expenditures provided to the Department by the Applicant.
        1. Applicants identified as low risk on the ICQ: In the event the documented services provided by the Applicant do not justify the level of award being provided to the Applicant, future payments may be withheld or reduced until such time as the services documentation provided by the Applicant equals the amounts previously provided to the Applicant to ensure each payment advanced does not exceed 1/12 cash-on-hand. Failure of the Applicant to provide timely, accurate and sufficiently detailed documentation will result in delayed payments and may result in a reduction to the total award.
        2. Applicants identified as Medium to High Risk on the ICQ: In the event the documented services provided by the Applicant do not justify the level of award being provided to the Applicant, future payments may be withheld or reduced until such time as the services documentation provided by the Applicant equals the amounts previously provided to the Applicant. Failure of the Applicant to provide timely, accurate and sufficiently detailed documentation will result in delayed payments and may result in a reduction to the total award.
      3. The final payment from the Department under this Agreement shall be made upon the Department's determination that all requirements under this Agreement have been completed, which determination shall not be unreasonably withheld. Such final payment will be subject to adjustment after the completion of a review of the Applicant's records as provided in the Agreement.
      4. In the event payments made by the Department to the Applicant exceed the total amount of Applicant reported and Department authorized expenditures, the Applicant will be required to issue a repayment to the Department in an amount equal to the overpayment.
  7. Questions Regarding this Notice of Funding Opportunity
    Please e-mail any questions regarding this Notice of Funding Opportunity to: DHS.YouthServicesInfo@Illinois.gov  with "IYIP FY20 Application Question." in the subject line of the email. Questions with their respective answers will be posted under the Questions & Answers link on the IDHS FY21 Family and Community Services Grant Information website located here. This section may be updated periodically as new questions are received, so applicants are encouraged to check it frequently. Only written answers posted on the website will be considered valid and official. The final deadline to submit any written questions regarding this Notice of Funding Opportunity will be Tuesday, June 23rd, 2020.
    There will be multiple in-person technical assistance sessions planned to be held throughout the state. For detailed information about times and locations, please click here.

Illinois Youth Investment Program NOFO (pdf)