To: The Honorable Pat Quinn, Governor and Members of the General Assembly

It is my pleasure to submit to you the Illinois Department of Human Services Fiscal Year 2009 Report of Illinois Child Care.

Child Care is essential for families transitioning from welfare to work, as well as those with low incomes striving to achieve and maintain self-sufficiency. Appropriation by the Illinois General Assembly allows the Department to ensure that parents with low incomes have the supportive systems to gain and maintain employment. Funds support access to a variety of child care settings and impact the quality of services provided to Illinois children. In Fiscal Year 2009, the DHS Child Care Assistance Program supported an average of 174,500 children from 90,100 families every month.

With your support, the Department will continue to serve Illinois children and families.

Sincerely,

Michelle R. B. Saddler, Secretary

INTRODUCTION

As required by State 20 ILCS 505/5.15, the Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS) annually submits a report to the Governor and to the Illinois General Assembly on the status of the Bureau of Child Care and Development Child Care Assistance Program. The 2009 Report on Illinois Child Care includes program information for Fiscal Year 2009 (July 1, 2008 to June 30, 3009). Information about DHS programs impacting the quality of child care is provided also. The data used in this report are from: a) the DHS Child Care Tracking System database for the Child Care Assistance Program; and b) the Illinois Network of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies aggregate databases of local Child Care Resource and Referral parent customers and child care providers. The report traces trends in family needs for child care and the system's capacity to respond to that need.

The report highlights the devotion of the people committed to the ideal of affordable, quality child care for all children. Furthermore, DHS hopes this report is beneficial to the Governor, members of the Illinois General Assembly, and the residents of the State. DHS thanks the thousands of center-based agency staff, family home practitioners, and Child Care Resource and Referral staff for their support in the care and education of Illinois children.

The Bureau of Child Care and Development Vision is: Illinois families will have multiple options for affordable quality child care and early education. All children starting at birth will be offered opportunities to grow, learn, and be cared for in safe, nurturing, culturally and developmentally appropriate settings.

CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Bureau of Child Care and Development is responsible for administrating and reporting on the federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) for the State of Illinois. This program is designed to provide low income families access to affordable, quality child care. In turn, it allows families to gain and maintain employment and supports independence from public assistance. CCDF guidelines extend flexibility to state agencies in developing child care programs and policies that best fit the needs of families. However, states must promote parent choice, make child care consumer education available, and provide quality supports for the child care workforce.

In Illinois, the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) provides child care for children ages six weeks to 13 years and for children with special needs who are 13 through 19 years of age. Families must be income eligible and either be employed or in approved education/training programs. Teen parents pursuing high school diplomas or equivalent can also receive assistance. Caretaker relatives, known as Representative Payees (RPY), who are employed, are eligible to received child care assistance. CCAP income eligibility levels were based on family size and the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) in FY2009.

All eligible families applying for the CCAP received services and no waiting lists were instituted in FY 2009.

GOALS

The Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) has two primary goals:

  1. To support qualifying low income families by providing child care subsidies. This allows parents to maintain employment or further their education, thereby decreasing dependence on public assistance.
  2. To allow families access to multiple options for affordable, quality child care, early education, and after school programs that offer children the opportunity to grow, learn and be cared for in safe, nurturing settings that are culturally and developmentally appropriate.

ADMINISTRATION

Contract Child Care Site Providers:

DHS contracted with 48 agencies in Fiscal Year 2009, including the City of Chicago Department of Family Support Services, to supply site administered CCAP services. These fee-for-service contracts served over 15,014 children throughout the state, ages six weeks to 13 years, whose families qualified for CCAP. Site Administered child care programs provided slots for children of low income families in licensed center-based and licensed home settings, determined family eligibility for CCAP, calculated family co-payments and performed other administrative duties. Site administered programs submitted payment information to DHS for processing. See Appendix D for a list of the Site Administered Child Care Providers.

Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies:

In Fiscal Year 2009, DHS contracted with 16 Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) agencies that were responsible for determining customer eligibility for Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) and approving payments to child care providers, both center-based and family homes. This included supplying CCAP information to families and providers, processing CCAP applications, determining eligibility and co-payment amounts, and processing provider payments. See Appendix C for a list of the CCRR agencies.

Migrant Seasonal Head Start Program:

Migrant Seasonal Head Start is a comprehensive program serving migrant and seasonal farm workers, at or below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), and their children. DHS contracts with five agencies statewide to meet the needs of these families, many of whom are not aware of available services and speak little or no English. Nine child care centers are contracted to provide full-day Head Start programming for 470 children ages six weeks to six years, parent involvement, and health and nutrition services.

REPORTING

Data included in this section and the next chapter is from the DHS Child Care Tracking System (CCTS). The CCTS captures an extensive amount of CCAP data including the number of providers paid by type of care, the number of children enrolled, the ages of children being served, family co-payment amounts and participant demographic information. Data from the CCTS is used to submit monthly reports required by the federal government. Also, it is used by DHS and its contractors to assess program progress, trends and areas in need of improvement.

Fiscal Year 2009 CCAP Enrollment (Table 1)

Total Families Enrolled: 155,520 (unduplicated number)
Monthly Average: 90,100

Total Children Enrolled: 272,401 (unduplicated number)
Monthly Average: 174,500

Annual Income Guidelines by Family Size (Chart A)

FY05 FY06 & FY07 FY08, Sept. 1 FY08, Apr. 1
Family Size of 2 $23,520 $24,612 $25,332 $28,008
Family Size of 3 $29,052 $30,396 $31,776 $35,208
Family Size of 4 $34,584 $36,192 $38,208 $42,408
Family Size of 5 $40,128 $41,976 $44,652 $49,608
Family Size of 6 $45,660 $47,772 $51,084 $56,808
Family Size of 7 $46,692 $48,852 $57,528 $64,008
Family Size of 8 $47,736 $49,944 $63,960 $71,208

Chart A, above, shows the increases in the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) income eligibility levels since Fiscal Year 2005. The third bar (FY08, Sept. 1) marks the switch from using State Median Income to Federal Poverty Level indicators to set income level maximums. Chart B, illustrates the number of CCAP families by percentage of FPL for the month of March 2009. Chart B contains information for all families.

Number of FY09 CCAP Families by Percentage of FPL (Chart B) 

Percentage of FPL Number of Families
10% 4,299
20% 685
30% 2,423
40% 1957
50% 3059
60% 4295
70% 5312
80% 6155
90% 6628
100% 6919
110% 6776
120% 6502
130% 5827
140% 5108
150% 4663
160% 3951
170% 3476
180% 2997
190% 2210
200% 1745
Over 200% 460

Data from March 2009;Cases over 200% of FPL are Representative Payee (RPY) cases. In these instances,
only the child is receiving TANF cash assistance. The child's caregiver is not the parent or stepparent and must be working to participate in the CCAP.

Families can apply for CCAP at their local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) agency (Appendix C) or at contracted child care site providers (Appendix D). Eligible families are required to share in the cost of care by making a co-payment directly to the provider. Co-payments are based on income, family size, number of children in care, and the number of hours they are in care. Chart C illustrates the number of families at a variety of co-payment levels for March 2009.

Number of Families by Monthly Co-payment Amount for March 2009 (Chart C)

CO-PAY AMOUNT NUMBER OF FAMILIES
$0 1,226
$1 to 25 9,789
$26 to 50 11,122
$51 to 100 23,959
$101 to 200 24,708
Greater than $200 13,906

FUNDING

The Illinois Child Care Program is funded by: Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Block Grant, Title XX Social Services Block Grant and state dollars. State spending includes a mandatory amount required by the federal government, CCDF Maintenance of Effort (MOE), and state matching dollars. Illinois takes full advantage of the federal CCDF, including the investment of more general revenue funds (state dollars) than required by the federal government. Chart D provides a breakdown of child care funding.

Fiscal Year 2009 Child Care Funding Sources (Chart D)

FUNDING SOURCE AMOUNT PERCENTAGE 
State GRF $451,344,188 56.02
CCDF $207,919,439 25.81
Title XX $1,200,000 .15
TANF $145,175,251 18.02

In State Fiscal Year 2009, DHS spent $780.9 million on employment-related child care programs. $680.4 million of this amount was expended on child care assistance, helping an average of 90,100 families with 174,500 children afford child care each month. An additional $2.9 million allowed an average of 483 Migrant Head Start children to attend child care programs during the five month migrant season. $46.2 million were spent on quality services that support child care (See Quality Program Activities, page 11). Special Projects were funded at $15.6 million. Other spending included: $25.4 million for non-direct services of CCAP, such as payments to contractors for eligibility determination and $6.0 million for administration costs.

CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS AND SERVICES

The Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) is available to all Illinois families that qualify. Parents participating in the CCAP vary by ethnicity, age, marital status, education level and number of children in care. Children enrolled in the CCAP are also diverse. The following charts and tables contain information and data regarding CCAP participants.

Profile of CCAP Participants in March 2009 (Table 2)

FAMILIES:

  • Average family size = 3.3.
  • 88.1% of families received subsidies because of employment.
  • 95.4% of families were headed by a single parent.
  • 52.8% of families were at or below the federal poverty threshold.

CHILDREN:

  • 55.4% of children were served in licensed care.
  • 15.3% of children were cared for by relatives.
  • Children under 1 year of age were in care an average of 152 hours per month.
  • School-age children (ages 6 and older) constitute 40% of all children served.

EXPENDITURES:

  • The average cost of care this month per child was $392 (monthly subsidy+parent co-pay)
  • 70.7% of the total expenditures were for children under 6 years of age.
  • 98.6% of families had co-payments, at an average of 6.7 of income.
  • The highest average cost of care was in McHenry County at $480 per child.

The CCAP requires that parents be employed or enrolled in approved education and/or training programs in order to be eligible for child care assistance. In March 2009, 88.1% of the families receiving CCAP subsidies were employed.

The CCAP allows families the choice to select the type of child care provider that best meets their needs. Parents can enroll their children in licensed child care centers, licensed family child care homes and group homes, as well as license-exempt centers and family child care settings. License-exempt family child care included care provided by relatives and friends.

Number of Providers Receiving CCAP Payments in FY09 (Table 3)

PROVIDERS NUMBER RECEIVING
Licensed Centers 2,637
Licensed Family Homes 8,125
Licensed Group Homes 364
TOTAL LICENSED PROVIDERS 11,126
License-Exempt Centers 783
License-Exempt Family Homes
(Non-Relative in Provider's Home)
14,011

License-Exempt Family Homes

(Relative in Provider's Home)

26,271

License-Exempt Family Homes

(Non-Relative in Child's Home)

11,198

License-Exempt Family Homes

(Relative in Child's Home)

14,517
TOTAL LICENSE-EXEMPT PROVIDERS 66,780
GRAND TOTAL: 77,906

The following Tables 4 and 6 provide information regarding the number of children in the CCAP by age and type of provider. Tables 5 and 7 display the average cost of care statewide by age and type of care.

Number of Children in Full-time Care by Age and Type of Care (Table 4)

Age Licensed
Center
License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767) TOTAL
Birth to 14 months 4,765 45 3,686 214 1,263 2,598 735 1,184 14,490
15 to 24 months 5,821 52 3,693 240 1,010 2,119 711 1,120 14,766
25 to 30 months 4,262 43 2,232 163 584 1,206 411 580 9,481
31 to 36 months 4,353 36 2,074 141 525 1,157 344 623 9,253
37 months to 4 yrs 17,132 855 6,497 490 1,897 3,980 1,512 2,139 34,502
5 years 5,429 555 2,425 166 905 1,885 833 1,124 13,322
6 to 12 years 2,574 706 7,009 399 4,981 10,445 5,835 7,333 39,282
13 years & older 9 7 96 3 97 174 94 159 639
TOTAL 44,345 2,299 27,712 1,816 11,262 23,564 10,475 14,262 135,735

Data from the service month of March 2009.

NOTE: Data reported here are duplicative and also only represents the children in full-time care.

*Type of care codes for license-exempt family child care providers: 764=Non-relative in the provider's home; 765=Relative in the provider's home; 766=Non-relative in the child's home; and 767=Relative in the child's home.

Average Amount Paid for Full-time Care by Age and Type of Care (Table 5)

Age Licensed Center License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767)
Birth to 14 months $605 $568 $431 $428 $204 $207 $218 $214
15 to 24 months $619 $608 $444 $458 $215 $217 $219 $219
25 to 30 months $526 $572 $425 $439 $221 $216 $218 $225
31 to 36 months $529 $534 $424 $428 $216 $215 $226 $226
37 months to 4 yrs $443 $433 $406 $416 $218 $221 $222 $226
5 years $456 $447 $413 $413 $215 $221 $230 $227
6 to 12 years $431 $427 $413 $435 $222 $224 $233 $229
13 years & older $531 $517 $450 $467 $231 $230 $233 $236

Data from the service month of March 2009 and does NOT include parent co-pay amounts.

NOTE: These are statewide averages and are not necessarily representative of any one case. Provider reimbursement rates vary by region, type of care and the hours a child is in care. (See Appendix E)

Number of Children in Part-time Care by Age and Type of Care (Table 6)

Age Licensed Center License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767) TOTAL
Birth to 14 months 217 4 153 5 73 169 60 94 775
15 to 24 months 263 3 161 9 84 151 53 87 811
25 to 30 months 189 5 89 6 46 94 34 50 513
31 to 36 months 235 2 65 2 37 94 30 54 519
37 months to 4 yrs 953 89 366 19 172 449 144 215 2,407
5 years 1,064 369 451 14 169 397 105 187 2,756
6 to 12 years 8,934 4,477 4,819 309 1,994 4,396 1,701 2,642 29,272
13 years & older 22 17 31 1 21 53 26 52 223
TOTAL 11,878 4,966 6,135 365 2,596 5,803 2,153 3,381 37,277

Data from the service month of March 2009.

NOTE: Data reported here are duplicative and also only represents the children in part-time care.

*Type of care codes for license-exempt family child care providers: 764=Non-relative in the provider's home; 765=Relative in the provider's home; 766=Non-relative in the child's home; and 767=Relative in the child's home.

Average Amount Paid for Part-Time Care by Age and Type of Care (Table 7)

Age Licensed Center License Exempt Center Licensed FCC Home Licensed Group Home License Exempt FCC Home*(764) License Exempt FCC Home*(765) License Exempt FCC Home*(766) License Exempt FCC Home*(767)
Birth to 14 months $236 $141 $177 $148 $85 $91 $100 $96
15 to 24 months $243 $152 $198 $189 $99 $99 $91 $104
25 to 30 months $219 $224 $187 $197 $96 $96 $87 $106
31 to 36 months $216 $182 $186 $256 $110 $99 $102 $103
37 months to 4 yrs $180 $169 $172 $193 $94 $103 $102 $99
5 years $196 $180 $181 $171 $98 $105 $101 $99
6 to 12 years $213 $194 $192 $187 $107 $107 $108 $108
13 years & older $237 $195 $193 $240 $113 $112 $114 $116

Data from the service month of March 2009 and does NOT include parent co-pay amounts. NOTE: These are statewide averages and are not necessarily representative of any one case. Provider reimbursement rates vary by region, type of care and the hours a child is in care. (See Appendix E)

QUALITY PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) requires at least four percent of federal funds be allocated for the improvement of child care quality (See Funding on page 5). These funds are used to support a variety of services for children, families, child care practitioners and communities. In Fiscal Year 2009, DHS contracted with Child Care Resource and Referral agencies (CCRRs) to provide parents with consumer education and referrals to child care programs, giving them information necessary to make knowledgeable choices. CCRRs offer technical assistance to communities and employers interested in the development of child care options and supports. Additionally, child care practitioners are supported through technical assistance, professional development opportunities and other resources.

CCRRS are responsible for compiling and maintaining parent, customer and child care provider databases. The parent database includes information such as: family size and income, type of child care requested, and hours of care requested. Provider database information includes type of care, licensing status, capacity, hours of operation, and fees. CCRRs are also required to record data for quality program services. The list of quality services begins at the bottom of this page.

QUALITY PROGRAM GOAL

The goal of the Quality Program is to increase the quality of child care available to all Illinois families. The goal is addressed with a multi-faceted approach that works to meet the individual needs of families, child care practitioners and communities.

ADMINISTRATION

In Fiscal Year 2009, DHS contracted with 16 CCRR agencies and the Illinois Network of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (INCCRRA) to implement multiple quality programs. These agencies supply the following services:

CCRRs

Families

  • Consumer education on legal and quality child care
  • Referrals to child care settings according to family preferences
  • Referrals to CCAP, other DHS programs, community services

Child CarePrograms & Practitioners

  • Free referrals to families
  • Technical assistance and consultation on topics such as: quality child care settings, child development, health and safety, inclusion, business practices and relationships with parents
  • Training opportunities and Professional Development Funds
  • Program Improvement and Accreditation Funds
  • Equipment/Facility Improvement grants
  • Resources, such as printed materials and lending library items

Communities

  • Technical assistance, such as child care supply and demand information
  • Resource development/recruitment of new child care in areas of need
  • Advisement on community and employer options to supply child care

INCCRRA

Families

  • Toll-free number, in English and Spanish, that connects parents and providers to local CCRRs
  • Website that educates users about INCCRRA's services and local CCRRs

Child CarePrograms & Practitioners

  • The Illinois Trainers Network statewide training seminars
  • Gateways to Opportunity: Illinois Professional Development System, including: Gateways Credentials, Professional Development Advisors
  • Gateways to Opportunity Scholarship Program
  • Great START Wage Supplement Program
  • Quality Counts: Quality Rating System

Communities

  • Compilation of local and aggregate statewide data, including parent referral and provider database information, as well as other quality program data
  • CCRR staff training and professional development
  • Statewide outreach marketing resources

REPORTING

Much of the data contained in the Quality Program sections are from the parent, customer and child care provider databases compiled by local CCRRs. Therefore, the data presented does not include all families and children requiring child care services in Illinois. Most families do not receive child care assistance and many families find child care services through friends, family, advertisements and other means. Additionally, although licensed child care centers and family child care homes in the State are included in the provider database, many license-exempt programs, especially family homes, are not included. Because of these factors, it is important to note that this report is only one means of examining the larger child care supply and demand picture in Illinois.

FAMILIES

Families of any income level can receive child care referrals and consumer education from Child Care Resource and Referral agencies (CCRRs). In Fiscal Year 2009, 29,853 families received child care referrals for 42,648 children. A statewide sliding fee scale based on Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) eligibility requirements is used to assess charges for referrals. An annual fee ranging from $0 - $30 is calculated for families, and within that time period multiple referrals may be requested. Parents who are income eligible for the CCAP receive this service free of charge. CCRR staff insure that parents requesting child care referrals are made aware of CCAP. Conversely, those applying for the CCAP are informed about child care referral services.

Families who are income eligible for the CCAP represent the largest group of consumers of child care referrals. In Fiscal Year 2009, these families were 89.3 percent of the total seeking child care referrals.

CHILD CARE PRACTITIONERS

CCRRs support child care providers by referring families to programs. Licensed centers, family child care homes and group homes are listed in the provider database. License-exempt centers and homes may choose to be included on the provider database. Every provider has the option to decline parent referral services. Fiscal Year 2009 provider database numbers are shown in Table 8 below.

Fiscal Year 2009 Statewide Child Care Database (Table 8)

TYPE OF CARE NUMBER OF PROVIDERS NUMBER OF SPACES
Licensed Family Homes 10,717 94,232
License-Exempt Homes 712 2,164
TOTAL FAMILY HOMES 11,429 96,396
Licensed Centers 3,187 231,221
License-Exempt Centers 2,433 152,751
TOTAL CENTERS 5,620 388,972

In addition to the provider database remaining steady at over 17,000, the number of providers willing to enroll children whose parents were approved for the CCAP also remains steady. In Fiscal Year 2009, as in the previous three years, 70% of providers on the CCRR database were willing to care for children whose parents participate in the CCAP.

CHILD CARE DEMAND

There are two dimensions of the "demand" for child care in any community.

  1. Number of children needing child care compared to the number of child care spaces available to meet the need; and
  2. The unique requirements of families for their specific child care needs, such as child's age, type of care desired, parent schedule, location, special needs of the child and cost.

Table 9 compares types of schedules requested in FY 2009 and the number of providers on the database by the schedule offered.

Table 9: FY09 Schedules Requested for Children and Offered by Providers

SCHEDULE Requested for Children Offered by Family ChildCare Homes Offered by Child CareCenters Offered by Providers TOTAL
Standard Hours* 36,210 10,293 2,878 13,171
Evening 6,040 4,001 99 4,100
Weekend 3,444 1,394 52 1,446
Overnight 1,594 2.944 38 2,982
Rotating 1,230 4,245 777 5,022
Temp/Emergency 232 5,609 767 6,376
Drop In 198 5,094 859 5,953

*A standard schedule is full-time care offered during traditional work hours.

NOTE: Multiple schedules may be requested for one child so numbers will not add to the total number of children for whom care was requested. Providers may also offer more than one schedule.

QUALITY PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS AND SERVICES

Quality services are available to families and child care providers statewide. Child Care Resource and Referral agencies (CCRRs) compile child care provider database information to supply referrals to families based on unique needs and preferences. Parents requesting child care referrals receive a listing of potential providers, as well as information regarding legal child care and indicators of quality care. Child care referral services supply listings that are strictly referral, not recommendations for child care.

Child care practitioners are offered a wide variety of programs and supports to help improve the quality of care they provide. CCRRs administer multiple programs aimed at supplying providers with the support and resources necessary to improve program quality. These quality supports:

  • Encourage increased professionalism and educational attainment for child care practitioners,
  • Supply required in-service training to maintain Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) licensing, and
  • Offer grants to expand capacity and increase quality in child care programs and settings.

FAMILIES

Table 10 shows information about families who received child care referrals during Fiscal Year 2009:

FY09 Families Receiving Child Care Referrals (Table 10)

  • 29,853 families received child care referrals.
  • 79% of families required care due to employment.
  • 1,149 families of children with special needs requested referrals.
  • 12,738 requests were made for non-standard schedules.

NOTE: A standard child care schedule is full-time care offered during traditional work hours.

FY09 Number of Children for Whom Child Care was Requested by Age and Type of Care (Table 11)

Number Percentage
REQUESTS BY AGE
Infants & Toddlers 14,700 34.5%
Two Year Old Children 4,972 11.6%
Three - Four Year Old Children 12,691 29.8%
Five Year Olds/Kindergarteners 3,012 7.1%
School Age Children 7,271 17.0%
TOTAL CHILDREN 42,646 100%
REQUESTS BY TYPE OF CARE*
Child Care Center 43,758 57.5%
Family Child Care Home 31,961 42.0%
In-Home Care 331 0.4%
TOTAL REQUESTS 76,050 100%

*Families may request more than one type of care.

CHILD CARE PRACTITIONERS

Child care practitioners care for children in a variety of settings: child care centers, their own homes and in the home of the child. Child Care Resource and Referral agencies (CCRRs) off a variety of services to support the work done by child care practitioners.

Training

One service provided by the CCRRs is training for child care practitioners. CCRRs supply training services based on the results of needs assessments that include input from providers, DHS, DCFS, and other community organizations within their Service Delivery Area (SDA). Training includes stand-alone workshops and workshop series and self study materials. Topics such as health and safety, child development, nutrition, guidance and discipline, inclusion, and program assessment are routinely offered. Some are free of charge. Training sessions for the still fairly new program Quality Counts: Quality Rating System are also offered by the CCRRs (see page 18.)

Professional Development Funds

CCRRs promote quality by assisting child care practitioners with Professional Development Funds. These monies can be used for college tuition, Gateways to Opportunity credentials, and non-CCRR sponsored conferences and training expenses.

Program Improvement and Accreditation Funds

Center-based and family child care programs are encouraged to pursue quality improvement. Voluntary participation in the new Quality Rating system (QRS) and/or national accreditation provides pathways to improve quality. CCRRs offer information about QRS and accreditation processes, technical assistance and support funds.

Equipment/Facility Improvement Grants

Any provider on a CCRR database is eligible to apply for an equipment/facility improvement grant (a.k.a. Quality Counts Grants). This funding is available by a competitive grant process with the goal of increasing capacity and improving quality in child care programs. Awards vary from $100 to $12,000 depending on provider type and program capacity. These grants may be used for materials, equipment and/or facility improvements. Children and providers have benefited from the grants supplying such things as:

  • Fencing
  • Outdoor and indoor play equipment
  • Child-sized tables and chairs
  • Cribs and high chairs
  • Adaptive equipment for children with special needs

Sixty-three percent of the funds expended in FY09 for the Quality Counts Grants were used for equipment and materials for children. The remaining 37% was used for facility improvement, and parent and professional resources.

DHS has set infant/toddler needs as one of the priorities for these grants. In FY09, 40% of the funds went to meeting the needs of infants and toddlers.

Fiscal Year 2009 Quality Program Services (Table 12)

  • Training Sessions (Stand alone workshops & workshop series only) = 3,532
  • Training Participants = 55,121
  • Professional Development Fund Grants = 3,084
  • Program Improvement/Accreditation Grants = 477
  • Equipment/Facility Improvement Grants = 889

Gateways to Opportunity Scholarship Program

The Gateways to Opportunity Scholarship Program is an individual-based scholarship opportunity for practitioners working in Early Care and Education (ECE). Practitioners working in DCFS licensed centers and family child care homes can apply for a Gateways Scholarship. Goals of the program are:

  • Enabling practitioners to continue education in ECE and to earn degrees and/or credentials
  • Promoting increased earning ability through increased education
  • Improving the quality and consistency of care received by children in licensed child care settings

The Gateways Scholarship Program will pay a percentage of the cost of tuition, fees and books based on an eligible participant's child care income. The program also provides bonuses based on an eligible participant's grade point average and completion of work commitment in ECE.

Great START

Great START (Strategies to Attract and Retain Teachers) is a wage supplement program that offers financial incentives to licensed center and family child care home practitioners who have attained education beyond state licensing requirements and who remain employed by the same child care program. Wage supplements are awarded every six months based on the level of formal education an eligible applicant has achieved and continue as long as the practitioner remains employed by the same program. Program data shows higher retention rates for Great START participants than the field overall. Data also shows increasing attainment of formal education by participants. Over 5,000 early care and education practitioners participated in Great START in Fiscal Year 2009.

Illinois Quality Counts: Quality Rating System

The Illinois Quality Counts: Quality Rating System (QRS) assists Illinois child care programs in providing quality care for children and their families. This voluntary system is available to License-Exempt Family Child Care providers, Licensed Family Child Care providers, and Licensed Child Care Centers. The QRS offers levels of recognition which providers can achieve depending on the type of care they provide. There is required training that must be completed prior to any provider applying for QRS. In addition, there are basic QRS eligibility requirements specific to the type of child care. Providers must serve children eligible for the DHS Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) to participate in QRS. Once a child care provider has met the required criteria for a level, they are awarded a certificate for their achievement and receive a quality add-on rate to the CCAP standard daily reimbursement rate. Technical assistance, training and supports are offered to all types of providers through their local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCRR) agency. In Fiscal Year 2009, 389 providers, serving 13,472 children receiving CCAP assistance, were eligible for a QRS award.

The FY2009 Illinois Salary and Staffing Survey of Licensed Child Care Facilities can be found at the DHS Child Care website at www.dhs.state.il.us.

ACHIEVEMENTS AND OUTCOMES

The DHS Bureau of Child Care and Development, in partnership with the Child Care Advisory Council, developed a three-year strategic plan that was adopted in April 2009. This plan guides the Bureau with program improvement in relation to available resources. The strategic goals and objectives listed in the plan build on currently offered child care services and include recommendations related to policy, program assessment, service expansion and quality improvements. Five major goals are stated in the plan, each with accompanying strategies and action steps.

As stated above, this three-year Strategic Plan was adopted in April 2009, the fourth quarter of the fiscal year. Therefore, very little progress was made before the end of Fiscal Year 2009. The goals and objectives of the new strategic plan are outlined below.

Goal 1: Fully implement a Child Care Assistance Program that provides all Illinois families with affordable access to quality child care.

  1. Change IDHS administrative policies and procedures that limit eligible families' access to the Child Care Assistance program.
  2. Ensure that child care is affordable for Illinois families by implementing the recommendations in IDHS' Making Quality Child Care Affordable for Illinois' Working Families report.
  3. Promote the Child Care Assistance Program and increase efforts to engage hard to reach families.
  4. Implement and support technological best practices to modernize and improve the efficiency of the Child Care Assistance Program.
  5. Align IDHS provider payment policies with best business practices.
  6. Improve access to the Child Care Assistance Program for children with special needs.
  7. Develop an ongoing process to solicit feedback from families (utilizing a variety of instruments and procedures) and incorporate the findings into policies and practices deemed appropriate.

Goal 2: Support a quality child care system through adequate standards, base rates, the Quality Rating System (QRS), and other initiatives to improve the early care and education of children.

  1. Incorporate evaluation and quality assurance into the Child Care Assistance Program and other IDHS Bureau of Child Care and Development-funded activities.
  2. Establish provider reimbursement rates that are adequate and ensure access to quality care.
  3. Evaluate the Quality Counts Quality Rating System.
  4. Increase the quality of care in family child care homes.
  5. Promote child development and early education in all child care settings.
  6. Make recommendations to DCFS on licensing standards in support of desired outcomes promoted through the early care and education system.

Goal 3: Support a highly qualified diverse workforce that is well-compensated for the care and education provided to children.

  1. Strengthen the partnership between the Child Care Advisory Council, Professional Development Advisory Council (PDAC), and the Illinois Network of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (INCCRRA).
  2. Support professional development activities.
  3. Support state strategies that improve the working conditions and compensation available to staff.
  4. Regularly disseminate information to and solicit feedback from child care providers in IDHS policies related to the child care workforce.

Goal 4: Promote a coordinated early care and education system achieved through partnerships between federal, state, and community agencies and supported by policies, procedures and funding.

  1. Expand and diversify the Child Care Advisory Council membership.
  2. Advance collaboration among state and federal entities, including the Child Care Advisory Council, Early Learning Council, Head Start, Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE), the Illinois Network of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (INCCRRA), and other key partners to ensure an effective communication system and alignment of strategies.
  3. Promote the alignment and rules and policies across child care and early education programs to remove barriers, maximize the ability of families to access the programs they need, and strengthen the connections among programs, including family child care homes.
  4. In conjunction with the Early Learning Council and the Good Start, Grow Smart Team support the development of community early childhood councils.
  5. Explore models of service access that support families as they look for early care and education in their communities.

Goal 5: Ensure a child care program that has access to sufficient capital to maintain, upgrade and build new facilities to meet community needs.

  1. Included the child care program in any state capital funding plans by identifying and tracking opportunities at the federal and state levels.
  2. Examine strategies to encourage eco-friendly operating practices in child care facilities through exploring and securing necessary expertise.

Appendix A
INCOME GUIDELINES FOR THE CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

FAMILY SIZE MAXIMUM GROSS
ANNUAL INCOME
2 28,008
3 35,208
4 42,408
5 49,608
6 56,808
7 64,008
8 71,208

Appendix B
CCAP ENROLLMENT PROFILES BY COUNTY

The following table provides information regarding CCAP participation by county for the State of Illinois. The data being reported is from March 2009. It does NOT include the Chicago Department of Family Support Services site administered child care program.

County # of Families In the CCAP % of Families Statewide Number of Children % of Children Average Monthly Payment Per Child % of Working Families % of Families with TANF Income % of Single Parent Families % of Children in Licensed Care % of Children with 2 or More Providers % of Children in Care of a Relative
Adams 492 0.6% 835 0.5% $274 85.0% 2.0% 94.7% 68.1% 5.6% 13.4%
Alexander 129 0.1% 283 0.2% $246 78.0% 19.4% 98.4% 16.6% 3.5% 25.1%
Bond 58 0.1% 89 0.1% $287 79.3% 5.2% 91.4% 65.2% 6.7% 5.6%
Boone 212 0.2% 366 0.2% $394 87.1% 1.4% 98.6% 67.2% 1.9% 9.0%
Brown 8 0.0% 11 0.0% $271 87.5% 0.0% 100.0% 72.7% 0.0% 0.0%
Bureau 99 0.1% 154 0.1% $313 88.7% 3.0% 87.6% 73.4% 0.0% 12.3%
Calhoun 3 0.0% 4 0.0% $177 66.7% 0.0% 100.0% 75.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Carroll 42 0.0% 66 0.0% $291 90.0% 7.1% 92.5% 59.1% 6.1% 13.6%
Cass 58 0.1% 110 0.1% $240 91.4% 1.7% 96.6% 38.2% 4.5% 24.5%
Champaign 1,857 2.1% 3,222 2.0% $377 93.1% 1.3% 94.3% 66.1% 4.7% 10.9%
Christian 105 0.1% 190 0.1% $296 88.6% 1.0% 93.3% 50.5% 4.7% 17.9%
Clark 72 0.1% 132 0.1% $239 84.1% 5.6% 73.9% 74.2% 3.8% 12.1%
Clay 57 0.1% 98 0.1% $247 89.5% 5.3% 86.0% 74.5% 1.0% 10.2%
Clinton 109 0.1% 179 0.1% $317 86.9% 5.5% 84.1% 79.9% 3.4% 5.6%
Coles 297 0.3% 464 0.3% $291 85.7% 0.7% 86.4% 66.4% 3.9% 15.1%
Cook 50,225 56.3% 91,319 57.2% $408 88.2% 5.5% 96.7% 50.1% 2.2% 16.9%
Crawford 72 0.1% 108 0.1% $275 81.7% 2.8% 85.9% 75.9% 3.7% 6.5%
Cumberland 44 0.0% 69 0.0% $274 88.1% 4.5% 73.8% 63.8% 4.3% 18.8%
De Witt 55 0.1% 100 0.1% $266 90.7% 5.5% 92.6% 43.0% 0.0% 28.0%
DeKalb 613 0.7% 907 0.6% $455 78.3% 1.5% 91.0% 73.9% 4.5% 9.5%
Douglas 80 0.1% 138 0.1% $306 92.4% 1.3% 89.9% 55.8% 2.2% 16.7%
DuPage 2,160 2.4% 3,649 2.3% $466 90.3% 2.2% 94.0% 73.9% 2.5% 7.2%
Edgar 83 0.1% 137 0.1% $284 89.0% 1.2% 93.9% 67.2% 1.5% 9.5%
Edwards 16 0.0% 22 0.0% $285 75.0% 0.0% 93.8% 68.2% 9.1% 13.6%
Effingham 152 0.2% 266 0.2% $270 90.7% 0.7% 89.4% 77.4% 2.3% 5.6%
Fayette 88 0.1% 157 0.1% $256 85.2% 2.3% 85.2% 56.1% 0.6% 14.6%
Ford 51 0.1% 89 0.1% $303 92.2% 0.0% 96.1% 62.9% 5.6% 22.5%
Franklin 290 0.3% 491 0.3% $318 88.8% 2.6% 94.8% 77.2% 1.1% 7.9%
Fulton 113 0.1% 178 0.1% $324 81.1% 2.7% 86.5% 67.4% 2.8% 11.2%
Gallatin 15 0.0% 25 0.0% $270 86.7% 0.0% 93.3% 32.0% 4.0% 24.0%
Greene 46 0.1% 75 0.0% $262 84.8% 0.0% 95.7% 69.3% 4.0% 13.3%
Grundy 117 0.1% 189 0.1% $379 88.8% 2.6% 94.8% 77.2% 1.1% 7.9%
Hamilton 28 0.0% 44 0.0% $245 82.1% 0.0% 82.1% 54.5% 0.0% 13.6%
Hancock 50 0.1% 86 0.1% $261 78.0% 2.0% 90.0% 68.6% 10.5% 17.4%
Hardin 18 0.0% 35 0.0% $294 77.8% 0.0% 88.9% 91.4% 5.7% 11.4%
Henderson 9 0.0% 17 0.0% $228 88.9% 0.0% 66.7% 58.8% 0.0% 17.6%
Henry 150 0.2% 263 0.2% $288 80.5% 3.3% 91.9% 57.4% 4.9% 17.9%
Iroquois 118 0.1% 208 0.1% $294 92.4% 0.0% 94.9% 51.4% 1.0% 23.6%
Jackson 458 0.5% 727 0.5% $331 66.9% 5.9% 89.4% 59.0% 3.0% 23.1%
Jasper 36 0.0% 60 0.0% $282 91.4% 2.8% 80.0% 73.3% 6.7% 5.0%
Jefferson 302 0.3% 494 0.3% $276 79.9% 7.9% 91.5% 59.5% 6.5% 13.0%
Jersey 59 0.1% 88 0.1% $300 77.6% 0.0% 96.6% 83.0% 8.0% 12.5%
Jo Daviess 36 0.0% 68 0.0% $251 88.6% 2.8% 94.3% 47.1% 5.9% 29.4%
Johnson 38 0.0% 54 0.0% $295 81.6% 5.3% 86.8% 88.9% 1.9% 1.9%
Kane 1,787 2.0% 3,338 2.1% $424 89.4% 1.6% 95.4% 59.9% 2.2% 13.3%
Kankakee 912 1.0% 1,765 1.1% $361 88.2% 2.3% 96.6% 54.6% 3.4% 17.7%
Kendall 207 0.2% 373 0.2% $442 86.3% 2.9% 93.6% 64.3% 0.8% 5.1%
Knox 272 0.3% 457 0.3% $265 85.1% 2.6% 93.3% 46.2% 6.1% 20.1%
La Salle 286 0.3% 479 0.3% $317 84.9% 2.8% 94.7% 53.7% 0.8% 15.9%
Lake 3,317 3.7% 6,077 3.8% $457 94.6% 1.7% 89.7% 76.8% 2.6% 10.6%
Lawrence 49 0.1% 77 0.0% $280 80.4% 10.2% 93.5% 74.0% 2.6% 9.1%
Lee 118 0.1% 196 0.1% $350 90.6% 3.4% 92.3% 77.6% 3.6% 11.7%
Livingston 104 0.1% 170 0.1% $298 91.2% 2.9% 94.1% 59.4% 2.4% 25.9%
Logan 134 0.2% 205 0.1% $329 90.2% 2.2% 89.5% 52.2% 2.4% 15.1%
Macon 1,154 1.3% 2,091 1.3% $314 96.0% 1.6% 97.6% 48.6% 3.7% 18.2%
Macoupin 141 0.2% 222 0.1% $318 84.3% 0.7% 89.3% 56.8% 0.9% 16.7%
Madison 1,432 1.6% 2,409 1.5% $352 82.0% 5.1% 94.2% 61.0% 4.6% 11.4%
Marion 356 0.4% 609 0.4% $287 82.9% 6.7% 89.1% 66.0% 4.6% 15.3%
Marshall 11 0.0% 26 0.0% $282 81.8% 0.0% 90.9% 61.5% 11.5% 42.3%
Mason 45 0.1% 83 0.1% $260 86.4% 0.0% 97.7% 49.4% 4.8% 24.1%
Massac 78 0.1% 136 0.1% $263 76.9% 3.8% 89.7% 53,7% 8.1% 14.7%
McDonough 113 0.1% 175 0.1% $304 66.1% 5.3% 85.7% 60.0% 7.4% 14.9%
McHenry 754 0.8% 1,202 0.8% $480 89.4% 1.9% 90.5% 82.2% 1.9% 4.1%
McLean 1,079 1.2% 1,757 1.1% $407 87.3% 2.3% 91.4% 72.7% 3.8% 14.8%
Menard 41 0.0% 60 0.0% $342 95.1% 0.0% 92.7% 58.3% 1.7% 20.0%
Mercer 46 0.1% 77 0.0% $355 82.6% 4.3% 89.1% 88.3% 2.6% 2.6%
Monroe 72 0.1% 130 0.1% $411 94.2% 4.2% 89.9% 95.4% 0.0% 0.0%
Montgomery 114 0.1% 186 0.1% $310 85.1% 0.0% 85.1% 71.5% 4.3% 12.9%
Morgan 241 0.3% 426 0.3% $309 87.8% 2.5% 87.8% 61.5% 5.4% 4.9%
Moultrie 70 0.1% 128 0.1% $296 94.2% 2.9% 88.4% 71.1% 5.5% 14.1%
Ogle 279 0.3% 474 0.3% $343 84.1% 1.1% 91.3% 69.0% 3.2% 9.7%
Peoria 1,900 2.1% 3,430 2.1% $372 87.7% 3.4% 95.9% 55.6% 5.2% 16.9%
Perry 118 0.1% 196 0.1% $297 79.7% 0.0% 89.8% 51.5% 6.1% 21.4%
Piatt 50 0.1% 79 0.1% $323 95.8% 4.0% 89.6% 62.0% 3.8% 16.5%
Pike 56 0.1% 94 0.1% $264 80.0% 1.8% 89.1% 74.5% 4.3% 5.3%
Pope 23 0.0% 35 0.0% $303 60.9% 8.7% 87.0% 71.4% 11.4% 5.7%
Pulaski 69 0.1% 140 0.1% $251 75.4% 5.8% 94.2% 37.1% 0.0% 18.6%
Putnam 2 0.0% 3 0.0% $169 100.0% 0.0% 100.0% 33.3% 0.0% 66.7%
Randolph 123 0.1% 199 0.1% $298 86.2% 3.3% 95.1% 51.3% 1.5% 14.6%
Richland 74 0.1% 118 0.1% $296 76.7% 4.1% 91.8% 66.9% 8.5% 8.5%
Rock Island 911 1.0% 1,521 1.0% $374 84.8% 2.1% 94.2% 69.6% 4.2% 8.3%
Saline 219 0.2% 380 0.2% $303 83.1% 0.5% 90.0% 63.2% 4.5% 16.8%
Sangamon 2,004 2.2% 3,502 2.2% $359 91.4% 5.1% 93.9% 51.7% 4.2% 16.6%
Schuyler 30 0.0% 54 0.0% $288 83.3% 0.0% 96.7% 74.1% 5.6% 11.1%
Scott 15 0.0% 19 0.0% $293 80.0% 0.0% 93.3% 78.9% 0.0% 10.5%
Shelby 47 0.1% 81 0.1% $244 80.4% 2.1% 84.8% 37.0% 4.9% 30.9%
St. Clair 3,078 3.5% 5,667 3.6% $347 85.4% 6.0% 97.1% 59.4% 4.1% 12.5%
Stark 13 0.0% 23 0.0% $404 100.0% 0.0% 100.0% 82.6% 0.0% 8.7%
Stephenson 351 0.4% 651 0.4% $290 87.4% 5.4% 91.7% 53.9% 4.1% 19.5%
Tazewell 687 0.8% 1,057 0.7% $426 88.1% 3.2% 94.6% 78.4% 3.2% 5.4%
Union 48 0.1% 80 0.1% $257 79.2% 0.0% 83.3% 45.0% 1.3% 17.5%
Vermillion 676 0.8% 1,300 0.8% $296 91.8% 3.6% 96.0% 44.5% 2.8% 20.6%
Wabash 29 0.0% 50 0.0% $261 79.3% 0.0% 89.7% 54.0% 6.0% 28.0%
Warren 65 0.1% 109 0.1% $307 87.5% 3.1% 92.2% 68.8% 3.7% 11.0%
Washington 45 0.1% 70 0.0% $282 84.4% 6.7% 88.9% 55.7% 5.7% 9.6%
Wayne 37 0.0% 73 0.0% $316 81.1% 0.0% 78.4% 64.4% 2.7% 9.6%
White 59 0.1% 90 0.1% $319 83.1% 0.0% 89.8% 82.2% 5.6% 13.3%
Whiteside 314 0.4% 556 0.3% $372 90.0% 2.9% 92.9% 68.3% 2.9% 13.1%
Will 2,517 2.8% 4,566 2.9% $376 88.6% 3.1% 96.3% 54.7% 2.8% 16.2%
Williamson 439 0.5% 709 0.4% $324 81.7% 0.9% 88.1% 67.3% 3.9% 12.1%
Winnebago 2,722 3.1% 5,034 3.2% $369 88.1% 1.2% 96.4% 57.6% 3.9% 12.6%
Woodford 89 0.1% 131 0.1% $354 81.8% 1.1% 95.5% 63.4% 0.8% 14.5%

Appendix C
Child Care Resource and Referral Agency Contact Information

SDA PROGRAM NAME PHONE NUMBERS COUNTIES SERVED
Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies (INCCRRA)1226 Towanda PlazaBloomington, IL 61701

(877)20-CHILD

(877-202-4453)

(800) 649-1884

(309) 829-5327

TTY (800)649-1884

All Counties in Illinois.
1 YWCA Child Care Solutions4990 East State StreetRockford, IL 61108

REF (815) 484-9442

(888) 225-7072

PROV (815) 484-9442

CCAP (800) 872-9780

(815) 484-9448

TTY (815) 484-9442

Boone, JoDaviess, Stephenson, Winnebago
2 4C: Community Coordinated Child CareChild Care Resource & Referral155 North 3rd Street, Suite 300DeKalb, IL 601154C McHenry County667 Ridgeway DriveMcHenry, IL 60050

REF (815) 758-8149 x287

(800) 848-8727 x287

PROV (815) 758-8149 x286

(800) 848-8727 x286

REF & PROV(815) 344-5510

(866) 347-2277

CCAP (815) 758-8149 x225

(800) 848-8727 x225

Carroll, DeKalb, Lee, Ogle, WhitesideMcHenryCarroll, DeKalb, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Whiteside
3 YWCA Child Care Resource & ReferralYWCA Lake County2133 BelvidereWaukegan, IL 60085

REF & PROV(800) 244-5376

(847) 662-4247

CCAP (847) 662-6129

FAX (847) 662-4707

TTY (847) 662-4752

Lake
4 YWCA Child Care Resource & Referral739 Roosevelt RoadBuilding #8, Suite 210Glen Ellyn, IL 60137

REF & PROV(630) 790-8137

(630) 790-3030

CCAP (630) 790-8009

TTY (630) 790-8137

DuPage, Kane
5 Child Care Resource & Referral801 North Larkin, Suite 202Joliet, IL 60435

REF (815) 741-1179

(800) 552-2256

PROV (815) 741-1163

CCAP (815) 741-4622

(800) 641-4622

Grundy, Kankakee, Kendall, Will
6 Illinois Action for ChildrenCook County Child Care Resource & Referral4753 North Broadway, Suite 1200Chicago, IL 60640

REF & CCAP(312) 823-1100

FAX (312) 823-1200

Cook
7 Community Child Care Resource & ReferralCommunity Action of Eastern Iowa500 East 59th StreetDavenport, IA 52807

REF & CCAP(563) 324-3236

(866) 324-3236

Henderson, Henry, Knos, McDonough, Mercer, Rock Island, Warren
8 Child Care ConnectionIllinois Central College5407 N. UniversityEast Peoria, IL 61635-0001

REF (309) 690-7300

(800) 421-4371

CCAP (309) 690-7300

(800) 301-3304

Bureau, Fulton, LaSalle, Marshall, Peoria, Putnam, Stark, Tazewell, Woodford
9 Child Care Resource & Referral Network207 West Jefferson, Suite 301Bloomington, IL 61701

REF & CCAP(309) 828-1892

(800) 437-8256

DeWitt, Ford, Livingston, McLean
10 Child Care Resource ServiceUniversity of Illinois314 Bevier Hall905 S. Goodwin AvenueUrbana, IL 61801

REF & CCAP(217) 333-3252

(800) 325-5516

TTY (217) 244-9660

Champaign, Douglas, Iroquois, Macon, Piatt, Vermillion
11 Child Care Resource & ReferralEastern Illinois UniversityKlehm Hall, Room 1325600 Lincoln AvenueCharleston, IL 61920

REF (217) 581-6698

(800) 545-7439

PROV (800) 545-7439

CCAP (217) 581-7081

(800) 643-1026

Clark, Coles, Cumberland, Edgar, Moultrie, Shelby
12 West Central Child Care Connection510 Maine Street, Room 610Quincy, IL 62301

REF & CCAP(217) 222-2550

(800) 782-7318

Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Greene, Hancock, Jersey, Pike, Schuyler
13 Community Child Care Connection, Inc.1004 North Milton AvenueSpringfield, IL 62702-4430

REF & CCAP(217) 525-2805

(800) 676-2805

Christian, Logan, Macoupin, Mason, Menard, Montgomery, Morgan, Sangamon, Scott
14 Children's Home & Aid of IllinoisChild Care Resource & Referral 2133 Johnson Road, Suite 100AGranite City, IL 62040

REF & PROV(800) 467-9200

CCAP (800) 847-6770

Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, St. Clair, Washington
15 Project CHILD - Child Care Resource & Referral327 Potomac BoulevardP.O. Box 826Mt. Vernon, IL 62864

REF & CCAP(800) 362-7257

(618) 244-2210

Clay, Crawford, Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jefferson, Lawrence, Marion, Richland, Wabash, Wayne
16 Child Care Resource & ReferralJohn A Logan College700 Logan College RoadCarterville, IL 62918 REF & CCAP(800) 548-5563 Alexander, Franklin,Gallatin, Perry, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Johnson, Massac, Pulaski, Pope, Saline, Union, White, Williamson

Appendix D
Fiscal Year 2009 Contracted Child Care Site Providers

PROGRAM NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP CODE
First Step Day Cay Care Center 1300 Pearl Street Belvidere IL 61008
Bloomington Day Care Center, Inc. 2708 East Lincoln Bloomington IL 61704
Heartland Head Start 206 Still Well, P.O. Box 1585 Bloomington IL 61702-1585
Carole Robertson Center for Learning 2020 West Roosevelt Road Chicago IL 60608-1148
Casa Central. Inc. 1343 North Carolina Avenue Chicago IL 60622-2803
Chicago State University 9501 South King Drive-RUC 101 Chicago IL 60628
Chicago Urban Day School 1248 West 69th Chicago IL 60636
Child Services 8765 West Higgins Road, #450 Chicago IL 60631
Children's Home & Aid Society of Illinois 125 South Wacker Drive, Floor 14 Chicago IL 60606-4475
City of Chicago Dept of Family Support Services 1615 West Chicago Avenue Chicago IL 60622-5127
Community & Economic Development Assoc/Cook Co 208 South LaSalle, Suite 1900 Chicago IL 60604-1119
Ezzard Charles School 7946 South Ashland, P.O. Box 208079 Chicago IL 60620-8079
Fifth City Child Development Institute, Inc. 3411 West 5th Avenue Chicago IL 60624-3239
First Congregational Church 1305 North Hamlin Chicago IL 60651
Hull House Association 1712 South Prairia Chicago IL 60616
Improved Child Care Management Services, Inc. 1130 South Michigan Avenue, Suite 304 Chicago IL 60605
Marillac Social Center 212 South Francisco Avenue Chicago IL 60612-3618
Mary Crane League 2905 North Leavitt Street Chicago IL 60618-8105
Northwestern University Settlement 1400 West Augusta Boulevard Chicago IL 60622-3939
Ounce of Prevention Fund 33 West Monroe Street, Suite 2400 Chicago IL 60603
Puerto Rican Cultural Center 2739-41 West Division Street Chicago IL 60622
St. Vincent de Paul Center 2145 North Halsted Chicago IL 60614
Aunt Martha's Youth Service Center, Inc. 233 West Joe Orr Road, North Building Chicago Heights IL 60411
Children's Center of Tazewell County 210 North Thorncrest Drive Creve Coeur IL 61610-3960
4C: Community Coordinated Child Care 155 North 3rd Street, Suite 300 DeKalb IL 60115-3365
Northwest Suburban Day Care Center 1755 Howard Des Plaines IL 60018
East Moline Citizens for Community Center 489 - 27th Street East Moline IL 61244
YWCA of Elgin 220 East Chicago Street Elgin IL 60120
Child Care Network of Evanston 1416 Lake Street Evanston IL 60201
Kiddie Kollege of Fairfield 2226 Mt. Vernon Road, P.O. Box 362 Fairfield IL 62837
Geneseo Development & Growth, Inc 541 East North Street, P.O. Box 172 Geneseo IL 61524
Human Development Corporation 142 East 154th Street Harvey IL 60426-3326
Highland Park Community Nursery School & Day Care 1850 Green Bay Road Highland Park IL 60035-3110
Tri-Con Child Care Center, Inc 425 Laurel Avenue Highland Park IL 60035-2652
Program Name Address City State Zip Code
Educational Day Care 330 West Michigan Avenue Jacksonville IL 62650-3223
YWCA of Kankakee 1086 East court Street Kankakee IL 60901-4255
The Pillars Community Services 8020 W. 87th Street LaGrange IL 60525
Kid's Hope United, Inc. P.O. Box 1128 Lake Villa IL 60046-1128
McDonough County Council for Child Development 425 North Prairie Macomb IL 61455-1882
Community Mennonite 3215 West 162nd Street Markham IL 60426-5401
Just Kids Child Care P.O. Box 410 Milan IL 61264
Skip-A-Long Child Care Centers, Inc. 4800 - 60th Street Moline IL 61265-8104
Oak Park/River Forest Day Nursery 1139 Randolph Street Oak Park IL 60302-3422
Paxton Day Care Center 200 North Elm Street Paxton IL 60957
Rockford Day Care Center 208 South Rockton Avenue Rockford IL 61102-2256
Thornton Township High School Dist. 205 465 East 170th South Holland IL 60473-3481
Stickney Township 6721 West 40th Street Stickney IL 60402
Streator Child Development Center 405 Chicago Street Streator IL 61364

Appendix E
CHILD CARE PAYMENT RATE CHARTS

Effective July 1, 2008

Group 1A Counties: Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake & McHenry

Under Age 2
Full Day/Part Day
Age 2
Full Day/Part Day
Age 3 and Older
Full Day/ Part Day/School Age Day
Licensed and Lic. Exempt
Day Care Centers
$40.50/$20.25 $34.20/$17.10 $28.50/$14.25/$14.25
Licensed Day Care Homes or Lic. Group Day Care Homes $26.60/13.30 $25.60/$12.80 $24.00/$12.00

Group 1B Counties: Boone, Champaign, Kankakee, Madison, McLean, Monroe, Ogle, Peoria, Rock Island, Sangamon, St. Clair, Tazewell, Will, Winnebago, & Woodford

Under Age 2
Full Day/Part Day
Age 2
Full Day/Part Day
Age 3 and Older
Full Day/ Part Day/School Age Day
Licensed and Lic. Exempt Day Care Centers $40.50/$20/25 $32.00/$16.00 $24.00/$12.00/$12.00
Licensed Day Care Homes or Lic. Group Day Care Homes 23.60/$11.80 $22.60/$11.30 $21.60/$10.80

Group 2 Counties: All counties not listed above

Under Age 2Full Day/Part Day Age 2Full Day/Part Day Age 3 and Older
Full Day/ Part Day/School Age Day
Licensed and Lic. Exempt Day Care Centers $29.20/$14.60 $24.80/$12.40 $20.70/$10.35/$10.74
Licensed Day Care Homes or Lic. Group Day Care Homes $21.60/$10.80 $20.60/$10.30 $19.60/$9.80

Payment Rates for Non-Licensed Care - All Counties

All Children
Full Day/Part Day
License-Exempt Day Care Home, Non-Relative in Child's Home or Relative Care $12.75/$6.38