Independent Living Annual Report 2009

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.
State of Illinois
Department of Human Services

Independent Living means different things to different people. For those steeped in the Independent Living Movement, it means having control of one's life. Living independently does not mean however, doing everything for one's self, but being in control of decisions made about one's self. This is the foundation from which Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are founded.

A Center for Independent Living is a private, non-residential, community-based, not-for-profit, consumer-controlled organization that is mandated to provide four core services: Advocacy, Peer Support, Independent Living Skills Development and Information and Referral. Staff serve as role models, demonstrating that people with disabilities can be independent and productive. Their knowledge, support and guidance help to create informed choice options that give consumers the confidence to pursue their own independence and to realize their dreams and aspirations.

In contrast to more traditional medical models in which the "client" or "patient" is highly dependent on "experts," a CIL's emphasis is on "consumer" self-direction and control. CILs promote a positive self-image, which is important to developing significant peer relationships.

What truly distinguishes and set CILs apart from other organizations is the fact that consumer control exists on every level, where at least fifty one percent of staff, management staff and the Board of Directors must be persons with disabilities. Having consumer control in decision-making positions is paramount to maintaining the integrity of what a CIL should and must be. The most challenging barrier however, for people with disabilities to overcome is attitude. To gradually dismantle this barrier, CILs advocate for changes in legislation, provide disability awareness-related activities, develop technical assistance initiatives regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and work in a committed fashion to deinstitutionalize people with disabilities who can and want to live independently.

Clearly, CILs are not social service agencies, but agents for social change.

Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living

Establishment of Centers for Independent Living and Their Funding Source 1980 - 2009

  • 1980 - FEDERAL Access Living
  • 1981 - FEDERAL RAMP
  • 1985 - STATE SCIL and Peoria CIL (now AFA)
  • 1986 - STATE SICIL, IMPACT, LIFE, PACE, and Fox River Valley (now FITE)
  • 1987 - FEDERAL IICIL and WGCIL
  • 1988 - STATE PCIL and LINC
  • 1989 - STATE OPTIONS

Message

February 2010

Dear Colleague:

On behalf of the Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), we are pleased to share the 2009 Annual Report on Independent Living in Illinois. This report is reflective of the active cooperation and support of the Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living (INCIL), whose numerous programmatic contributions make this year's report a vivid record of what independent living means to Illinoisans with disabilities as well as the Disability Rights Movement.

Illinois' 23 Centers for Independent Living (CILs), in accordance with their mission, provided services to 104,571 Illinois citizens with disabilities in federal fiscal year 2009. These citizens received information and referral as well as direct services in their communities from CIL staff. The majority of staff is persons with disabilities who demonstrate on a daily basis that persons with disabilities can, and do, lead independent and productive lives. Many of the successes described in this report belong to them.

We also commend the Centers for the work on the Community Reintegration Program. Their tireless efforts have increased the quality of life of more than 1,600 individuals and saved the state millions of dollars over the past decade. In a similar vein, they have shown tremendous leadership in working with DHS and the MFP Steering Committee on the implementation of the innovative Money Follows the Person (MFP) system change grant.

In addition, the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established 16 years ago, in compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, and given authority for the planning of independent living services and policy activities. Among its many activities in 2009, SILC coordinated the 11th Annual Youth Leadership Summit at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, which allows the participants to experience a fully accessible and informative college experience.

We will continue to work in partnership with INCIL and SILC to explore and implement effective strategies to improve the quality of life for all persons with disabilities in Illinois.

Sincerely,

Michelle R.B. Saddler 
Secretary 
Illinois Department of Human Services 

Robert F. Kilbury, Rh.D.
Director
Division of Rehabilitation Services

Independent Living Unit - Program Highlights - FY '09

  • CILs served 93 of Illinois' 102 counties.
  • Direct services and Information and Referral contact combined for FFY'09 was 104,494
  • The Independent Living Unit (ILU) conducted three on-site full compliance reviews in FFY 2009. Each review was a three-day process which covered the CIL's programmatic, administrative and fiscal operations.
  • Ten follow-up/monitoring reviews were conducted in FFY'09
  • The ILU provided technical assistance to 23 CILs on 139 occasions during FFY'09
  • The ILU conducted 11 program related trainings in FFY'09
  • The ILU in conjunction with SILC developed the ARRA Part C funding stimulus Plan and amended the corresponding State Plan for Independent Living which was approved by the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on boards for FFY'09 was 70 percent.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on the administrative staff (decision making) of CILs for FFY'09 was 76 percent, which is a two percent increase from FFY'08.
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on staff for FFY'09 was 72 percent, which is the same as FFY'08.

Legislative Internship Project

Legislative Internship Project for Minorities with Disabilities and Individuals with Disabilities from Rural Communities

The Division of Rehabilitation Services's Independent Living Unit first awarded Legislative Internship grants to CILs to develop this project in FY 1998. This project provides opportunities for minorities, youth and those living in rural communities who have disabilities to learn about the legislative process. These opportunities enable participants to develop leadership and decision-making skills that enhance their ability to address legislative issues that impact them and their respective communities.

By engaging in and learning the basic components of the legislative process, individuals with disabilities can develop more effective interpersonal and communication skills while becoming more familiar with the process. Ultimately, participants will enhance their ability to self advocate and therefore, increase their potential for growth and independence.

From Institutionalization to Reintegration

More than 10,000 people in Illinois nursing homes have the capability to live independently within the community. For many years, CILs have worked with limited resources, to move persons with disabilities out of nursing homes and other institutions back into community-based independent living situations. To address this deficiency, the Home Services Program developed the Community Reintegration Program, which now awards grants to all 23 CILs in Illinois. These grants provide centers with the necessary resources to offer the start-up essentials (i.e., first month's rent, furniture, cooking equipment, peer support) to help individuals successfully transition back into the community.

This section of the Independent Living Annual Report provides snap shots of the ways in which this initiative has changed the lives of people with disabilities in FY'09.

Photo Captions

  • Top: NICIL assisted a consumer in moving out of the nursing home and back into the community. She is very happy about her new apartment and enjoys spending time with her family.
  • Bottom: Pictured (back) Shirley Black, SCIL Reintegration Coordinator, and Rajean Cruz, P.A.C.E. Reintegration Coordinator; (front) Vickie VanMeter-consumer who was reintegrated to live in her own home, and Vera Lee, Vickie's twin sister.

Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago

115 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60607

312-640-2100 (V)
888-253-7003 (TTY)

Serving: City of Chicago

  • AL actively participated in a coalition to close Howe Developmental Center, a dangerous institution for people with intellectual and psychiatric disabilities where more than 30 residents died due to negligence and substandard care over the course of several years.
  • Through the Disability Rights Action Coalition for Housing (DRACH), AL organized a successful campaign to lower the age of Senior Housing at the Chicago Housing Authority from 62 years old to 55 years old.
  • Released a report called Renaissance 2010 and Students with Disabilities. The Report tracks performance outcomes of students with disabilities at Renaissance 2010 Schools.
  • AL hosted the Accessibility FIRST conference held at Access Living which focused on the new construction provisions of the Fair Housing Act. There were 86 people in attendance, which included architects, developers, housing officials, and fair housing advocates.

Photo Captions

  • Top: DAWWN (Disability Advocacy Work With Networking) Member addressing the crowd at a rally to create more job opportunities.
  • Bottom:??A Consumer in a new apartment he secured through Access Living's Deinstitutionalization Program.

Advocates for Access

4450 N. Prospect Road, Suite C8
Peoria Heights, Illinois 61616

309-682-3500 (V)
309-682-3567 (TTY)

Serving: Fulton, Peoria, Tazewell, Woodford

  • AFA worked in conjunction with other CILs to garner community support in advocating to stop the cancellation of the Home Services Personal Assistant program. The program was reinstated at 80% of the FY '08 funding level.
  • AFA organized its first annual wheel-a-thon fundraiser to assist people with disabilities to live independently in their respective community.
  • AFA's Homeownership Program for people with disabilities was nationally recognized by the Secretary of Agriculture for its work with the USDA Rural Development program.
  • We assisted seven families with disabilities to become first-time homeowners.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Consumers attended a press conference held at AFA to advocate for Personal Assistant Program cuts to be restored.
  • Bottom: Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack holds a press conference at AFA regarding homeownership in rural communities.

DuPage Center for Independent Living

739 Roosevelt Road
Building 8, Suite 109
Glen Ellyn, Illinois 60137

630-469-2300 (V/TTY)

Serving: DuPage

  • DCIL conducted letter writing campaigns and developed phone banks in an effort to reinstate funding for the Home Services Program. Over 4000 letters were written to the Governor statewide.
  • 249 consumers received phones through the Center's amplified phone voucher program.
  • DCIL conducted two self Advocacy Trainings for transition students.
  • The Center continues to provide Senior Healthcare Insurance Provider Program.
  • This years Disability Law Series was attended by over 150 consumers, who learned about disability-related laws.
  • DCIL held advocacy and public relation events to keep buses running to a local shopping mall. As a result, the bus service continues.
  • DCIL conducted a Visually Impaired Awareness and Technology Fair. There were 200 people in attendance and approximately 40 vendors

Photo Caption

A group of students, along with their Transition Coordinator from Hinsdale South High School, attend the Center's Annual Stoll and Roll. The students wanted to "Give Back" as a result of our continued collaboration on projects such as self advocacy classes and circuit breaker registrations.

FITE Center for Independent Living

730 B. West Chicago Street
Elgin, Illinois 60123

847-695-5818 (V/TTY)

Serving: Kane, Kendall, McHenry

  • FITE added 134 personal assistants to our referrals lists, of which 15 were bilingual.
  • Introduced over 50 people to homeownership options, grants, and budgeting solutions. The goal is to help people with disabilities become homeowners.
  • FITE organized a march and rally in Elgin to restore funding cuts to human services programs and to inform people of the role human services play in the community. It became front page news in the local paper and resulted in more people volunteering and requesting services from FITE.
  • FITE performed accessability surveys in partnership with local libraries throughout our service area to improve access for people with disabilities.
  • FITE conducted American Sign Language/Deaf Culture classes for people with and without disabilities.

Photo Caption

Rally in Elgin, Illinois to bring awareness to budget cuts.

Illinois-Iowa Center for Independent Living

3708 11th Street, P.O. Box 6156
Rock Island, Illinois 61204-6156

309-793-0090 (V)
309-793-0693 (TTY)

Serving: Henry, Mercer, Rock Island in Illinois , Clinton, Muscatine, Scott in Iowa

  • IICIL, in conjunction with the Illinois Bureau of Blind Services, co-hosted the Louis Braille 200th Birthday Celebration along with the center's 21st year anniversary, in the form of an open house and awards program on March 30, 2009.
  • IICIL conducted an Employer Mentoring Day at which 48 youth learned job skills. In addition, the activities included employer workshops and a "dress for success" fashion show.
  • IICIL held its 19th ADA and the 10th Olmstead year celebrations, with 400 people in attendance. Several consumers spoke about how they have benefited from both laws.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Two IVCIL staff members are promoting IVCIL's services and programs at a local health fair.
  • Bottom: Donna enjoys living in her own home which IVCIL modified to meet her needs after she moved out of the nursing home.

Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living

18 Gunia Drive
LaSalle, Illinois 61301-9712

815-224-3126 (V)
815-224-8271 (TTY)

Serving: Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam, Stark

  • With IVCIL's assistance, nine individuals moved from institutional settings into their own apartments/homes.
  • IVCIL maintained its relationship with Mendota Community Hospital to increase accessibility for persons with disabilities. IVCIL reviewed floor plans and provided technical assistance for Mendota's new hospital and the hospital has committed to making recommended accessibility changes in the new facility.
  • IVCIL conducted disability awareness trainings to educate and lessen fears about persons with disabilities, to 92 medical personnel, 271 election judges, and 231 students in their service area. These trainings increased their knowledge and understanding of how to interact with people with disabilities.
  • The IVCIL provided 375 service contacts related to Individualized Education Programs, transitions, or inclusion to youth with disabilities and/or their parents/guardians.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Two IVCIL staff members are promoting IVCIL's services and programs at a local health fair.
  • Bottom: Donna enjoys living in her own home which IVCIL modified to meet her needs after she moved out of the nursing home.

Impact Center for Independent Living

2735 East Broadway
Alton, Illinois 62002

618-462-1411 (V)
618-474-5308 (TTY)

Serving: Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Bond

  • The Wood River Lions Club presented two checks for $600.00 each to IMPACT's Blind and Deaf Support Groups.
  • IMPACT staff along with consumers, the Illinois network of CILs and other community partners rallied at the Capitol in an effort to restore the Personal Assistant Program funds to CILs statewide. This effort led to an 80% restoration of the program's funding.
  • IMPACT's Executive Director, Cathy Contarino received the INCIL Edward V. Roberts Award for outstanding leadership in promoting and advancing the Disability Rights Movement.
  • IMPACT reintegrated seven people with disabilities into the community from nursing homes and other institutions.

Photo Captions

  • Top: IMPACT staff along with consumers, "The Network" and community partners, rally at the Capitol to restore the Personal Assistant Programs.
  • Bottom:??Violet Evans and Angela Botz from IMPACT are presented with $600.00 each for both blind and Deaf support groups from the Wood River Lions.

Jacksonville Area Center for Independent Living

15 Permac Road
Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

217-245-8371 (V/TTY)

Serving: Mason, Scott, Cass, Morgan

  • JACIL, through its Community Reintegration program, assisted three consumers to move from a nursing home into their own apartment within their communities.
  • JACIL's People First self-advocacy group accepted the sponsorship of the Jacksonville Kiwanis Club and became the People First Aktion Club, thus increasing their ability to do community service as well.
  • JACIL presented Knowledge is Power (KIP) workshops in which 20 people from the business community learned how to serve the Deaf in their businesses and 40 people learned how to communicate effectively with their doctors.

Photo captions

  • Top: Advocacy for disability issues often means speaking out at the capitol.
  • Bottom: Through collaboration with the local AMBUC group, who volunteer the labor, several Jacksonville area residents have new access to the world outside their homes.

Lake County Center for Independent Living

377 North Seymour Avenue
Mundelein, Illinois 60060

847-949-4440 (V/TTY)

Serving: Lake

  • LCCIL made strides in an effort to expand public transportation options in Lake County by creating two new pilot programs.
  • LCCIL successfully advocated for and collaborated with Equip for Equality on an equal access issue, when CIL interns were denied passage on the same train. As a result of these efforts, policy and training at Amtrak have been improved to ensure greater access.
  • LCCIL held its first annual Wheel-a-thon as a fundraising activity.
  • Each year eight women are selected from the 8th Congressional District and honored as "Winning Women". This year LCCIL Executive Director was honored as she was selected for her leadership, commitment, and vision.

Photo Captions

  • Top: LCCIL Voyager Interns and consumers at Disability Pride Parade.
  • Bottom:??Youth Leadership Advocate Laura Mellon and consumer at Options Transition fair.

Living Independence For Everyone

2201 Eastland Drive, Suite #1
Bloomington, Illinois 61704

309-663-5433 (V)
309-663-0054 (TTY)

Serving: Dewitt, Ford, Livingston, McLean

  • LIFE CIL advocated for housing authority accessibility compliance and helped people successfully apply for ramps and first-time home mortgages.
  • A LIFE CIL staff member is Chairperson of the Interpreter Licensure Board. They also educated hospitals about new technology for accessible communication for patients who are Deaf.
  • LIFE CIL advocated for accessible health care and for legislation to require health insurance coverage for hearing aids.
  • LIFE CIL educated parents of students with disabilities about educational rights and how to advocate for their children.
  • LIFE Center moved nine people from nursing homes to their own homes within their respective communities.

Photo Caption

Members of Normal Community West High School's Students for an Accessible Society and the Kids on the Block puppet troupe show off their puppets.

LINC Center for Independent Living

120 East A Street
Belleville, Illinois 62220-1401

618-235-9988 (V)
618-235-0451 (TTY)

Serving: St. Clair, Monroe, Randolph

  • LINC hosted numerous discussion and action groups regarding proposed budget and programming cuts that included a broad base of consumers and providers. This effort culminated in a rally that took place at LINC's office. Ongoing efforts included consumers at every point of advocacy including telephone calls, letters, e-mails, rally attendance and media events. The opportunity for teaching self advocacy to consumers was very powerful.
  • In addition LINC hired a new Executive Director who started in late July.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Consumers coming together to help raise funds for LINC.
  • Bottom: Consumers Tony Hill and Joe Avalon speaking to the public about how the budget cuts will affect them at the Governor Rally at LINC.

Northwestern Illinois Center for Independent Living

229 First Avenue, Suite #2
Rock Falls, Illinois 61071-1239

815- 625-7860 (V)
815-625-7863 (TTY)

Serving: Carroll, Lee, Ogle, JoDaviess, Whiteside

  • NICIL held its fourth Annual Walk-N-Roll. This year's event attracted over 120 participants.
  • NICIL was able to move eight consumers from nursing homes to their own homes within communities of their choice.
  • NICIL hosted their annual Cinco de Mayo picnic, reaching out to more than 400 Hispanic people within the community.
  • NICIL's Personal Assistance Program trained a total of 198 Personal Assistant and had 24 trainings throughout our five county service area.

Photo Captions

  • Top: On June 16th 2009 NICIL staff, volunteers and consumers attended a rally in front of State Representative Jerry Mitchell's office in Rock Falls to protest the state cuts that would eliminate the PA Program from all Illinois CIL's.
  • Bottom:??NICIL assisted a consumer in moving out of the nursing home and back into the community. She is very happy about her new apartment and enjoys spending time with her family.

Opportunities for Access

4206 Williamson Place, Suite 3
Mount Vernon, Illinois 62864

618-244-9212 (V)
618-244-9575 (TTY)

Serving: Clay, Clinton, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jefferson, Marion, Washington, Wayne, White, Edwards, Hamilton, and Wabash

  • OFA CILs Community Reintegration Program moved 12 consumers from nursing homes and back into the community.
  • OFA CIL partnered with other community organizations to secure funding to make the homes of 10 people with disabilities more accessible.
  • OFA CIL provides a third party service that enables DRS VR customers to obtain quick payment for necessary items to further their education, job searches, or employment opportunities.
  • OFA CIL maintains its successful Social Security and Pharmaceutical Procurement Programs that help people with disabilities stay free of nursing homes and other institutions.
  • OFA CIL received a $20,000.00 grant from Walgreens Distribution Center to provide 28 summer camp registration fees for disabled children.

Photo Caption

Opportunities For Accessís Executive Director, Mike Egbert receiving 2009 Justin Dart Distinguished Citizen Award at CCDI Conference from CCDI's Executive Director, Brendt Ramsey.

Options Center for Independent Living

22 Heritage Drive, Suite 107
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914

815-936-0100 (V)
815-936-0132 (TTY)

Serving: Kankakee, Iroquois

  • Options assisted 11 consumers to leave nursing homes and achieve independence, while assisting 71 other consumers to avoid institution
  • Options successfully advocated for 22 consumers to win approval for SSI/SSDI benefits
  • With technical assistance from Options, 84 businesses made their parking accessible and nine businesses improved their building accessibility
  • Options protected the rights of 40 children by representing their needs at 62 IEPs in 28 schools.
  • Options assisted 53 consumers to acquire affordable, accessible housing; of those, 38 used mobility-impaired housing choice vouchers.

Photo Caption

CrossWalks for Disabilities Support Group at the Kankakee State Park.

Persons Assuming Control of their Environment

1317 East Florida Ave., #27
Urbana, Illinois 61801

217-344-5433 (V)
217-344-5024 (TTY)

Serving: Champaign, Douglas, Edgar, Piatt, Vermilion

  • PACE staff increased promotion and awareness of the free ITAC amplified phone program and distributed over 136 phones to hard of hearing individuals
  • PACE's Personal Assistant program consumers, PAs, staff, and volunteers spoke out at a press conference and other legislative efforts against state budget cuts.
  • PACE's Deaf Advisory Committee (DAC) provided health awareness on Breast Cancer, Cervical Cancer and Prostate Cancer. DAC and Life Skills groups also provide H1N1 Swine Flu awareness.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Carlton Bruett Clothing discussed how clothing can be adapted to meet the many needs of PACE consumers and Division of Rehabilitation Services customers.
  • Bottom: Deaf Services Coordinator and consumers have advocated with Carle Clinic to ensure that their new technology, Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) is accessible to the deaf community. Carle agreed to get a live interpreter upon the deaf patient's request.

Progress Center for Independent Living

7521 Madison Street
Forest Park, Illinois 60130

708-209-1500 (V)
708-209-1827 (TTY)

Serving: Suburban Chicago

  • PCIL has a radio show, Vida Independiente (www.radiovidaindependiente.com), which was established in the summer of 2009. It has listeners from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Germany, and Spain.
  • PCIL served as fiscal agent and co-sponsor of the Fifth Annual Disability Pride Parade. Over 80 PCIL staff, board, and volunteers participated in the parade.
  • PCIL, in conjunction with the Make Medicare Work Project, created four videos using ASL interpreters explaining the basics of the program components. These videos are posted on www.deafmd.org, an online medical resource for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community.
  • PCIL, in conjunction with the local Area Agency on Aging, helped in the presentation of a 6-week health series called Take Charge of Your Health. PCIL helped adjust the curriculum and, therefore, was able to teach the first session to persons with disabilities specifically.

Photo Captions

  • Top: PCIL volunteer Gerardo Salinas and Exec. Dir. Horacio Esparza work at a remote broadcast of PCIL's radio show, Vida Independiente.
  • Bottom: From left to right, PCIL's Program Director John Jansa, Exec. Dir. Horacio Esparza, and Director of Advocacy Mark Karner, lead a press conference at PCIL offices detailing the impact of proposed budget cuts to PCIL operations.

Regional Access and Mobilization Project

202 Market Street
Rockford, Illinois 61107

815-968-7567 (V)
815-968-2401 (TTY)

Serving: Boone, Dekalb, Stephenson, Winnebago

  • RAMP served 210 Traumatic Brain Injury Consumers: "You never know when your life is going to change in a split second and ours did, it changed drastically. Bob went from working his whole life to laying in a hospital bed hanging on for his life. It was the worst time of our lives, hopefully the worst thing we will ever experience. Without the support of our friends, family and RAMP, we would not be where we are today." Jill, wife of Bob, RAMP TBI Consumer
  • Youth Education Advocates assisted 316 children.
  • RAMP's four Wheel-A-Thon events raised a total of $149,000 for the center.
  • Amy Roloff, from TLC's Little People Big World spoke at the RAMP Luncheon October 9, 2008 which raised $23,000.

Photo Captions

Top: Of the 861 students RAMP's iBelong Program educated, 93 percent improved their attitude towards people with disabilities by a pre and post test.

Bottom:??RAMP's Executive Director and race car driver, Julie Bosma, participates in Racing for RAMP. The event raised $18,000, Bosma raised $1,665.

Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living

2135 West Ramada Lane
Carbondale, Illinois 62901

618-457-3318 (V/TTY)

Serving: Franklin, Jackson, Perry, Williamson, Gallatin, Hardin, Saline

  • A 35-year-old woman (top photo) with severe mental/emotional illness found a job and secured housing for herself with the assistance of SICIL staff. Hardees has a food service worker that is able to support herself and she has an apartment she loves. She is now managing her mental health symptoms and maintains her own apartment and employment.
  • A 45-year-old man (bottom photo) who is deaf, had difficulty finding competitive employment. SICIL staff assisted him through job development and job coaching. He is now employed at Southern Illinois University maintenance department, lives in his own apartment and is also financially independent.
  • A major accomplishment for SICIL this year was the reinstatement of the Personal Assistant Program which had been eliminated from the state budget. SICIL was able to regain 80 percent of the funding.

Soyland Access for Independent Living

2449 Federal Drive
Decatur, Illinois 62526

217-876-8888 (V/TTY)

Serving: Macon, Moultrie, Shelby, Cumberland, Clark, Coles

  • SAIL staff and volunteers assisted 214 people with access to Illinois Cares RX and Circuit Breaker benefits.
  • AIL assisted 28 consumers in receiving low-vision eye exams and recommended devices.
  • SAIL staff conducted six American Sign Language classes, including Educational Interpreter Professional Assessment preparation class.
  • SAIL staff and volunteers conducted 23 awareness activities reaching 1,625 people.
  • SAIL referred eight consumers to Coles County Regional Planning and Development Commission for the IHDA Home Modification Program.
  • SAIL staff participated in public transportation activities in the rural areas of Macon, Clark and Cumberland counties.
  • The SAIL Autism/Asberger's Support Group hosted a two-week Drama Workshop and social skills training for youth up to age 14.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Diabetic Workshop participants received free glucometers and information on diabetes management.
  • Bottom: Participants at a SAIL awareness presentation learn first-hand how macular degeneration affects their vision.

Springfield Center for Independent Living

330 South Grand Avenue West
Springfield, Illinois 62704

217-523-2587 (V)
217-523-4032 (TTY)

Serving: Christian, Logan, Menard, Montgomery, Sangamon

  • SCIL provided training and technical assistance during 23 sessions of the Sangamon County Election Judge Training.
  • SCIL served as a transportation resource center on election day, November 4, 2008.
  • Volunteers from SCIL and other community partners helped consumers identify polling locations and answered questions regarding accessibility. Approximately 30 persons with disabilities were provided with rides to the polls.
  • SCIL, after several attempts, established a working relationship with the Springfield Public Schools District 186. Assistance to students and teachers will be provided by the Youth Transition Specialist.

Photo Captions

  • Top: SCIL booth at Kidsfest 2009. SCIL created a coloring book depicting children with disabilities, and other activities geared toward children's education.
  • Bottom:? Pictured (back) Shirley Black, SCIL Reintegration Coordinator, and Rajean Cruz, P.A.C.E. Reintegration Coordinator; (front) Vickie VanMeter-consumer who was reintegrated to live in her own home, and Vera Lee, Vickie's twin sister.

Stone-Hayes Center for Independent Living

39 North Prairie
Galesburg, Illinois 61401

309-344-1306(V/TTY)

Serving: Henderson, Knox, Warren

  • The last six months of the fiscal year have been a challenge but also an opportunity to live the mission of why CIL's are in existence.
  • Advocacy through TV, radio and newsprint interviews have proven the need for our Center is greater than ever.
  • Stone-Hayes CIL is now recognized within the communities we serve due to the dedication of the Executive Director and entire staff. This collaboration and networking have created greater opportunities such as employment, volunteerism, and full inclusion of the consumers we serve.

Photo Captions

  • Top: Stone-Hayes CIL participating in Health Jamboree/Warren County.
  • Bottom: Mayor addresses public at ADA Celebration.

West Central Illinois Center for Independent Living

300 Maine, Suite 104
Quincy, Illinois 62301

217-223-0400 (V)
217-223-0475 (TTY)

Serving: Adams, Pike, Brown, Schuyler, Hancock, McDonough

  • West Central Illinois Center for Independent Living in an ongoing effort to increase the knowledge of both parents and teachers of disabled youths hosted five Parent/Teacher trainings in the areas of special education, student's needs, rights & responsibilities and individualized education plans and applicable laws.
  • Through advocacy, WCI/CIL gained four affordable/accessible apartment units to be used for community reintegration consumers through the Neighborhood Stabilization Grant.
  • WCI/CIL successfully reintegrated eight consumers into accessible/affordable housing within the community.
  • WCI/CIL continues its ongoing efforts to increase opportunities, empower persons with disabilities, and provide education through its disability etiquette and community-based awareness trainings.

Photo caption

Disability Awareness with the Elementary School.

Will/Grundy Center for Independent Living

2415 A West Jefferson Street
Joliet, Illinois 60435

815-729-0162 (V)
815-729-2085 (TTY)

Serving: Will, Grundy

  • WGCIL moved 14 consumers from nursing homes into their own apartments.
  • Fifty-five students with disabilities and 33 mentors took part in WGCIL's Disability Mentoring Day, which was a very empowering experience for all participants.
  • A deaf consumer of WGCIL was presented with the Silver Eagle Award by the Joliet Rotary Club in recognition of his outstanding volunteer contributions as a senior citizen.
  • WGCIL was awarded Agency of the Year Award by the Illinois Telecommunication Access Corporation for distributing the most amplified telephones (344).
  • WGCIL was awarded the Agency of the Year by the Community Services Council of Will County.

Photo Caption

A reintegration consumer enjoys cleaning his apartment. He was tired of living in a nursing home and wrote to legislators about his desire to live independently.

Overall Individual CIL Operational Funding Chart FY 2009

CILS GRF VII B SSI VR 110 Totals Part C Grant Total
AL $339,661 $1,560 $61,638 $0 $402,859 $364,555 $767,414
AFA $244,486 $54,577 $22,550 $0 $321,613 $0 $321,613
DCIL $206,848 $1,542 $50,172 $0 $258,562 $0 $258,562
FITE $285,268 $35,676 $25,799 $0 $346,743 $0 $346,743
IICIL $95,626 $7,176 $33,772 $0 $136,574 $267,142 $403,716
IVCIL $308,102 $0 $0 $0 $308,102 $0 $308,102
IMPACT $333,384 $7,176 $23,063 $104,913 $468,536 $0 $468,536
JACIL $167,810 $1,311 $10,390 $0 $179,511 $130,671 $310,182
LCCIL $40,664 $7,176 $56,490 $0 $104,330 $248,690 $353,020
LIFE $199,791 $50,525 $51,554 $0 $301,870 $53,941 $355,811
LINC $183,189 $7,176 $65,305 $0 $255,670 $43,804 $299,474
NICIL $242,179 $43,177 $21,330 $0 $306,686 $0 $306,686
OFACIL $459,642 $7,176 $74,538 $0 $541,356 $126,155 $667,511
OPTIONS $106,902 $57,176 $10,250 $0 $174,328 $135,429 $309,757
PACE $219,114 $34,850 $21,054 $0 $275,018 $0 $275,018
PCIL $408,780 $7,176 $32,031 $0 $447,987 $0 $447,987
RAMP $172,515 $45,377 $36,243 $0 $254,135 $223,183 $477,318
SAIL $138,794 $1,507 $15,016 $0 $155,317 $237,742 $393,059
SCIL $316,358 $1,576 $31,746 $99,496 $449,176 $0 $449,176
SICIL $169,877 $85,050 $48,407 $0 $303,334 $125,486 $428,820
SHCIL $26,314 $1,575 $41,750 $0 $69,639 $224,336 $293,975
WCICIL $167,008 $1,440 $11,256 $0 $179,704 $96,125 $275,829
WGCIL $89,303 $1,308 $67,662 $0 $158,273 $244,484 $402,757
TOTAL $4,921,615 $461,283 $812,016 $204,409 $6,399,322 $2,521,743 $8,921,065

Age of Consumers Receiving Direct Services FY 2009

CIL Under 5 5-19 20-24 25-59 60 & Over Unknown Total
AL 1 39 47 370 144 0 601
AFA 1 17 10 98 11 0 137
DCIL 0 5 4 110 21 0 140
FITE 0 12 14 160 25 1 212
IICIL 0 5 10 141 129 0 285
IVCIL 3 52 12 64 15 0 146
IMPACT 3 32 18 160 242 0 455
JACIL 2 5 0 64 33 0 104
LCCIL 0 167 29 115 70 0 381
LIFE 0 7 11 107 70 2 197
LINC 12 163 11 184 96 0 466
NICIL 6 132 21 220 28 1 408
OFACIL 13 107 56 600 94 1 871
OPTIONS 0 22 18 138 120 0 298
PACE 3 31 14 258 259 0 565
PCIL 0 4 12 225 194 5 440
RAMP 28 313 46 467 139 0 993
SAIL 0 6 5 66 98 3 178
SCIL 1 19 21 106 28 0 175
SICIL 0 46 76 174 101 0 397
SHCIL 4 26 9 124 21 0 184
WCICIL 2 34 4 104 10 0 154
WGCIL 3 10 26 80 11 0 130
TOTAL 82 1,254 474 4,135 1,959 13 7,917
PERCENT 1% 16% 6% 52% 25% 0% 100%

Direct Service by Major Primary Disability FY 2009

CIL COGNITIVE MENTAL PHYSICAL HEARING VISUAL MULTI-DISABILITY OTHER Total
AL 38 47 247 28 15 223 3 601
AFA 23 25 58 6 4 19 2 137
DCIL 2 16 62 20 3 36 1 140
FITE 15 39 98 35 4 18 3 212
IICIL 0 12 45 45 103 78 2 285
IVCIL 14 6 25 15 0 82 4 146
IMPACT 42 28 101 12 228 44 0 455
JACIL 4 4 11 12 44 29 0 104
LCCIL 108 84 36 10 62 81 0 381
LIFE 15 19 45 1 41 76 0 197
LINC 85 99 115 26 21 107 13 466
NICIL 70 17 94 2 5 220 0 408
OFACIL 47 34 128 6 7 643 6 871
OPTIONS 32 15 77 4 99 61 10 298
PACE 17 10 43 62 50 336 47 565
PCIL 9 38 87 217 3 78 8 440
RAMP 194 93 209 45 11 435 6 993
SAIL 5 8 32 0 92 40 1 178
SCIL 39 17 47 7 10 52 3 175
SICIL 126 56 57 25 92 38 3 397
SHCIL 57 25 63 7 3 29 0 184
WCICIL 29 8 54 6 55 2 0 154
WGCIL 13 55 32 7 6 11 6 130
TOTAL 984 755 1,766 598 958 2,738 118 7,917
PERCENT 12% 10% 22% 8% 12% 35% 1% 100%

Consumers Receiving I&R and Direct Services by Gender FY 2009

CIL NO. COUNTIES SERVED NO. SERVED HOME COUNTY NO. SERVED OUTLYING COUNTIES TOTAL PERCENT HOME PERCENT OUTLYING
AL Chicago 593 8 601 99% 1%
AFA 4 101 36 137 74% 26%
DCIL 1 131 9 140 94% 6%
FITE 3 177 35 212 83% 17%
IICIL 3 234 51 285 82% 18%
IVCIL 5 105 41 146 72% 28%
IMPACT 6 367 88 455 81% 19%
JACIL 4 76 28 104 73% 27%
LCCIL 1 372 9 381 98% 2%
LIFE 4 131 66 197 66% 34%
LINC 3 356 110 466 76% 24%
NICIL 5 201 207 408 49% 51%
OFACIL 13 197 674 871 23% 77%
OPTIONS 2 219 79 298 73% 27%
PACE 5 392 173 565 69% 31%
PCIL 1 426 14 440 97% 3%
RAMP 4 407 586 993 41% 59%
SAIL 6 131 47 178 74% 26%
SCIL 5 157 18 175 90% 10%
SICIL 7 109 288 397 27% 73%
SHCIL 3 126 58 184 68% 32%
WCICIL 6 91 63 154 59% 41%
WGCIL 2 116 14 130 89% 11%
TOTAL 93 5,215 2,702 7,917 72% 28%

County Coverage FY 2009

CIL NO. COUNTIES SERVED NO. SERVED HOME COUNTY NO. SERVED OUTLYING COUNTIES TOTAL PERCENT HOME PERCENT OUTLYING
AL Chicago 593 8 601 99% 1%
AFA 4 101 36 137 74% 26%
DCIL 1 131 9 140 94% 6%
FITE 3 177 35 212 83% 17%
IICIL 3 234 51 285 82% 18%
IVCIL 5 105 41 146 72% 28%
IMPACT 6 367 88 455 81% 19%
JACIL 4 76 28 104 73% 27%
LCCIL 1 372 9 381 98% 2%
LIFE 4 131 66 197 66% 34%
LINC 3 356 110 466 76% 24%
NICIL 5 201 207 408 49% 51%
OFACIL 13 197 674 871 23% 77%
OPTIONS 2 219 79 298 73% 27%
PACE 5 392 173 565 69% 31%
PCIL 1 426 14 440 97% 3%
RAMP 4 407 586 993 41% 59%
SAIL 6 131 47 178 74% 26%
SCIL 5 157 18 175 90% 10%
SICIL 7 109 288 397 27% 73%
SHCIL 3 126 58 184 68% 32%
WCICIL 6 91 63 154 59% 41%
WGCIL 2 116 14 130 89% 11%
TOTAL 93 5,215 2,702 7,917 72% 28%

Ethnicity of Consumers Receiving Direct Service in FY 2009

CIL American Indian Asian African American Hispanic Native Hawaiian White Other Total
AL 1 8 385 62 2 138 5 601
AFA 2 0 42 2 0 91 0 137
DCIL 2 1 12 11 1 113 0 140
FITE 0 1 62 50 0 96 3 212
IICIL 2 1 52 10 0 220 0 285
IVCIL 1 0 5 9 0 131 0 146
IMPACT 1 5 37 3 0 403 6 455
JACIL 1 0 5 0 0 98 0 104
LCCIL 0 12 59 47 1 257 5 381
LIFE 2 2 15 2 0 175 1 197
LINC 0 3 157 1 1 304 0 466
NICIL 2 0 11 53 0 338 4 408
OFACIL 4 3 52 5 2 800 5 871
OPTIONS 0 0 38 5 0 252 3 298
PACE 1 4 119 6 0 435 0 565
PCIL 3 6 137 54 1 239 0 440
RAMP 6 10 168 38 1 755 15 993
SAIL 1 0 11 2 0 164 0 178
SCIL 0 0 47 0 0 126 2 175
SICIL 3 0 54 2 0 338 0 397
SHCIL 1 2 13 2 0 166 0 184
WCICIL 0 0 12 2 1 137 2 154
WGCIL 1 0 36 24 0 69 0 130
TOTAL 34 58 1,529 390 10 5,845 51 7,917
PERCENT 0.4% 0.7% 19% 5% 0% 74% 1% 100%

Over All Consumer Involvement FY 2009

No. and Percentage of Persons with Disabilities on Board of Directors No. and Percentage of Persons with Disabilities on Administrative Staff No. and Percentage of Persons with Disabilities on Program Staff
CIL With Disabilities Total Percent With Disabilities Total Percent With Disabilities Total Percent
AL 20 30 67% 7 12 59% 28 41 69%
AFA 8 14 57% 2 3 67% 5 7 71%
DCIL 9 13 69% 2 3 67% 6 6 100%
FITE 4 5 80% 4 4 100% 3 5 67%
IICIL 8 11 73% 10 11 91% 10 11 91%
IVCIL 9 10 90% 2 2 100% 5 6 83%
IMPACT 8 12 67% 3 3 100% 8 10 80%
JACIL 7 13 54% 2 3 67% 9 11 82%
LCCIL 7 11 64% 3 3 100% 9 11 82%
LIFE 7 12 58% 3 3 100% 8 8 100%
LINC 8 14 57% 1 3 33% 5 7 71%
NICIL 6 8 75% 2 2 100% 4 6 67%
OFACIL 3 3 100% 1 1 100% 4 9 44%
OPTIONS 7 11 64% 2 2 100% 8 12 67%
PACE 9 9 100% 1 2 50% 9 11 82%
PCIL 9 12 75% 3 7 43% 6 8 75%
RAMP 7 12 58% 5 11 45% 13 21 62%
SAIL 8 10 80% 1 2 50% 8 14 57%
SCIL 11 15 73% 5 5 100% 7 9 78%
SICIL 4 5 80% 5 9 56% 14 27 52%
SHCIL 4 7 57% 2 2 100% 3 5 60%
WCICIL 6 10 60% 3 5 60% 2 3 67%
WGCIL 8 15 53% 2 3 67% 6 10 60%
AVERAGE 8 70% 3 76% 8 72%

Illinois Department of Human Services
401 South Clinton Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607
100 South Grand Avenue East, Springfield, Illinois 62762
www.dhs.state.il.us

Programs, activities and employment opportunities in the Illinois Department of Human Services are open and accessible to any individual or group without regard to age, sex, race, sexual orientation, disability, ethnic origin or religion. The department is an equal opportunity employer and practices affirmative action and reasonable accommodation programs.

Printed by the Authority of the State of Illinois (03/10)