Independent Living Annual Report 2010

Helping Families. Supporting Communities. Empowering Individuals.
State of Illinois
Department of Human Services

Independent Living means different things to different people. For those steeped in the Independent Living Movement, it means having control of one's life. Living independently does not mean however, doing everything for one's self, but being in control of decisions made about one's self. This is the foundation from which Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are founded.

A Center for Independent Living is a private, non-residential, community-based, not-for-profit, consumer-controlled organization that is mandated to provide four core services: Advocacy, Peer Support, Independent Living Skills Development and Information and Referral. Staff serve as role models, demonstrating that people with disabilities can be independent and productive. Their knowledge, support and guidance help to create informed choice options that give consumers the confidence to pursue their own independence and to realize their dreams and aspirations.

In contrast to more traditional medical models in which the "client" or "patient" is highly dependent on "experts," a CIL's emphasis is on "consumer" self-direction and control. CILs promote a positive self-image, which is important to developing significant peer relationships.

What truly distinguishes and set CILs apart from other organizations is the fact that consumer control exists on every level, where at least fifty one percent of staff, management staff and the Board of Directors must be persons with disabilities. Having consumer control in decision-making positions is paramount to maintaining the integrity of what a CIL should and must be. The most challenging barrier however, for people with disabilities to overcome is attitude. To gradually dismantle this barrier, CILs advocate for changes in legislation, provide disability awareness-related activities, develop technical assistance initiatives regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and work in a committed fashion to deinstitutionalize people with disabilities who can and want to live independently.

Clearly, CILs are not social service agencies, but agents for social change.

Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living

Message

February 2010

Dear Colleague:

On behalf of the Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), we are pleased to share the 2010 Annual Report on Independent Living in Illinois. This report is reflective of the active cooperation and support of the Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living (INCIL), whose numerous programmatic contributions make this year's report a vivid record of what independent living means to Illinoisans with disabilities as well as the Disability Rights Movement.

Illinois' 23 Centers for Independent Living (CILs), in accordance with their mission, provided services to 63,919 Illinois citizens with disabilities in federal fiscal year 2010. These citizens received information and referral as well as direct services in their communities from CIL staff. The majority of staff are persons with disabilities who demonstrate on a daily basis that persons with disabilities can, and do, lead independent and productive lives. Many of the successes described in this report belong to them.

We also commend the Centers for the work on the Community Reintegration Program. Their tireless efforts have increased the quality of life of more than 1,765 individuals and saved the state millions of dollars over the past decade. In 2010, there were 167 individuals reintegrated. In a similar vein, they have shown tremendous leadership in working with DHS and the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Steering Committee on the implementation of the innovative MFP system change grant.

In addition, the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) was established 17 years ago, in compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, and given authority for the planning of independent living services and policy activities. Among its many activities in 2010, SILC in conjunction with DRS and with input from the Illinois Network of CILs (INCIL) and other community partners, developed the new three year State Plan for Independent Living which determines how IL services will be provided in Illinois over the next three years.

We will continue to work in partnership with INCIL and SILC to explore and implement effective strategies to improve the quality of life for all persons with disabilities in Illinois.

Sincerely,

Michelle R.B. Saddler 

Secretary

Illinois Department of Human Services 

Robert F. Kilbury, Rh.D.

Director

Division of Rehabilitation Services

Independent Living Unit - Program Highlights - FY '10

  • CILs served 93 of Illinois' 102 counties
  • Direct services and Information and Referral contact combined for FFY'10 was 58,440
  • The Independent Living Unit (ILU) conducted four on-site full compliance reviews in FFY'10. Each review was a three-day process which covered the CILs programmatic, administrative and fiscal operations
  • In addition to the regular on-site reviews, the ILU conducted nine on-site ARRA Part B funded reviews
  • The ILU developed and conducted an ARRA Part-C training for the nine non Part-C CILs in preparation for the ARRA Part-C funding competition
  • The ILU conducted seven follow-up/monitoring reviews in FFY'10
  • The ILU provided technical assistance to 23 CILs on 151 occasions during FFY'10
  • The ILU conducted seven program related trainings in FFY'10
  • The ILU conducted four fiscal trainings in FFY'10
  • The ILU in conjunction with SILC and with input from INCIL and other community partners, developed a new three year State Plan for Independent Living which was approved by the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on boards of directors for FFY'10 was 73 percent which is a three percent increase from FFY'09
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on the administrative staff (decision making) of CILs for FFY'10 was 83 percent which is a five percent increase from FFY'09
  • The percentage of persons with disabilities on staff for FFY'10 was 72 percent, which is the same as in FFY'09

Legislative Internship Project

Legislative Internship Project for Minorities with Disabilities and Individuals with Disabilities from Rural Communities

The Division of Rehabilitation Services's Independent Living Unit first awarded Legislative Internship grants to CILs to develop this project in FY 1998. This project provides opportunities for minorities, youth and those living in rural communities who have disabilities to learn about the legislative process. These opportunities enable participants to develop leadership and decision-making skills that enhance their ability to address legislative issues that impact them and their respective communities.

By engaging in and learning the basic components of the legislative process, individuals with disabilities can develop more effective interpersonal and communication skills while becoming more familiar with the process. Ultimately, participants will enhance their ability to self advocate and therefore, increase their potential for growth and independence.

Photo Captions

Legislative Interns at the Capital.

From Institutionalization to Reintegration

More than 10,000 people in Illinois nursing homes have the capability to live independently within the community. For many years, CILs have worked with limited resources, to move persons with disabilities out of nursing homes and other institutions back into community-based independent living situations. To address this deficiency, the Home Services Program developed the Community Reintegration Program, which now awards grants to all 23 CILs in Illinois. These grants provide centers with the necessary resources to offer the start-up essentials (i.e., first month's rent, furniture, cooking equipment, peer support) to help individuals successfully transition back into the community.

This section of the IL Annual Report provides snap shots of the ways in which this initiative has changed the lives of people with disabilities in FFY'10.

Photo Captions

Captions: Top: The day after moving out of a nursing home, a consumer of NICIL's Community Reintegration Program enjoys his first breakfast in his own apartment.

Bottom: A consumer of IMPACT's Ramp and Home Modification Stimulus Program sits outside after finally gaining access due to his newly paved ramp.

Access Living of Metropolitan Chicago

115 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60607

312-640-2100 (V)

888-253-7003 (TTY)

Serving: City of Chicago

  • Reached a historic settlement agreement with the State of Illinois so people with psychiatric disabilities will have the opportunity to move out of institutions.
  • Launched the Disability Justice Mentoring Collective, a program for young people with disabilities rooted in disability experience and social change.
  • In partnership with UIC and NCD released, "The State of Housing in America in the 21st Century: A Disability Perspective," a report on the state of housing for people with disabilities nationally.
  • Hosted the Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy's "Listening Tour," an event for the disability community to provide input about employment barriers.
  • Worked with the Chicago Housing Authority to allocate 36 Housing Choice Vouchers for people with disabilities living in nursing homes and reintegrated 26 people into the community.

Photo Captions

Captions: Top: In 2010, Access Living initiated a new peer mentor program called the Disability Justice Mentoring Collective.

Bottom: Graduates from Access Living's YIELDD program, a leadership development training -- the first in the country geared toward disability.

Advocates for Access

4450 N. Prospect Road, Suite C8
Peoria Heights, Illinois 61616

309-682-3500 (V)

309-682-3567 (TTY)

Serving: Fulton, Peoria, Tazewell, Woodford

Advocates for Access, through the use of federal grant funds were able to complete the following tasks:

  • Update technology including obtaining a new server and laptops for staff.
  • Converted from an Access Database to an online data base for Consumer Service Records which makes it possible to enter records from the field and receive signatures in the field with the use of a portable printer.
  • Marketed the center through an advertising campaign to increase community awareness and increase consumer participation.
  • Completed five ramps in collaboration with a faith-based organization so that consumers could have access in and out of their homes.
  • Advocates for Access applied for a grant with the Federal Government to receive Part C funds and received notification that the grant was approved.

Photo Captions

Caption: After 5 years in a nursing home, where he had been recovering from a stroke, Andy Gallo is now enjoying his independence within the community thanks to the assistance of DCIL.

DuPage Center for Independent Living

739 Roosevelt Road
Building 8, Suite 109
Glen Ellyn, Illinois 60137

630-469-2300 (V/TTY)

Serving: DuPage

  • DCIL became a partner in the Illinois Imagines Project to end sexual violence against women with disabilities.
  • 4 consumers reintegrated from the nursing home back into the community.
  • DCIL held a Visually Impaired Awareness Day that included 39 vendors and over 200 participants.
  • DCIL became a Partner with the Area Agency on Aging to provide resources for persons with disabilities.
  • DCIL continues to have a certified SHIP (Senior Healthcare Insurance Provider) on staff to educate consumers about health insurance options.
  • DCIL secured new funding through the Federal ARRA Part C application process. This grant will allow the Center to hire a new Youth Services Coordinator. These services will include education, advocacy and transition assistance to area youth with disabilities.

Photo Captions

Above: After 5 years in a nursing home, where he had been recovering from a stroke, Andy Gallo is now enjoying his independence within the community thanks to the assistance of DCIL.

FITE Center for Independent Living

1230 Larkin Avenue
Elgin, Illinois 60123

847-695-5818 (V/TTY)

Serving: Kane, Kendall, McHenry

FITE reintegrated eight individuals from nursing homes back into the community.

  • FITE added three new peer support groups. Latino Support group, Pages book and writing group and Happenings, a group for young adults with disabilities.
  • A consumer with learning disabilities found studying for his driver's license exam difficult and failed the exam. After working with FITE coordinators to tailor his learning, he took the exam and proudly passed. He recently purchased a car and is going to college.
  • FITE is participating in the Illinois Imagines Project. A pilot program which focuses on sexual assault and women with disabilities.
  • FITE started an intern program encouraging people with disabilities to learn office skills for job readiness.

Photo Captions

Top: FITE employees, Board Members, and consumers at the state capitol.

Bottom: Executive Director, Marci Savage with late Board Treasurer, Loretta Carter at a FITE event.

Illinois-Iowa Center for Independent Living

3708 11th Street
P.O. Box 6156
Rock Island, Illinois 61204-6156

309-793-0090 (V)

309-793-0693 (TTY)

Serving: Henry, Mercer, Rock Island in Illinois, Clinton, Muscatine, Scott in Iowa

  • IICIL hosted two ADA Events - A 20th Celebration and Press Conference - July 23, 2010 at the IICIL. 400 people attended and we used the event as an opportunity to address general budget woes in Illinois with the media. 3000 people attended a River Bandits baseball game at Modern Woodman Park on July 28th. The Sparkles cheerleaders with disabilities performed and a deaf group signed, while a woman that was blind sang the anthem.
  • 300 people attended our Disability and Senior Expo with 50 vendors having booths. We distributed low tech devices and offered health screenings. We hosted 3 H1N1 vaccination clinics through a grant from the IDPH and INCIL.
  • The Holiday Carnival was held in December and children received gifts and a picture with Santa.

Photo Captions

Top: Sparkles Cheerleaders (front row) who consist of people with disabilities perform with Pleasant Valley High School Cheerleaders (rear row) at Modern Woodman Park - 20th ADA Quad-Cities Celebration

Bottom: Deaf individuals signing national anthem at the Celebration

Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living

18 Gunia Drive
LaSalle, Illinois 61301-9712

815-224-3126 (V)

815-224-8271 (TTY)

Serving: Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam, Stark

  • With IVCIL's assistance, 6 individuals moved from institutional settings into their own apartments/homes.
  • 245 people with disabilities experienced increased access and independence through acquisition of assistive technology devices such as amplified phones, magnifiers, large print/talking devices and mobility equipment such as wheelchairs or walkers.
  • Through IVCIL's advocacy and education, Illinois Valley Community Hospital and Mendota Community Hospital have remote video interpreting capabilities. Thus, patients who are deaf can now have instant communication access.
  • To educate the community and lessen fears about people with disabilities, IVCIL conducted disability awareness trainings in which over 500 students, along with other community members, increased their understanding of how to interact with people with disabilities.

Photo Captions

Top: IVCIL staff members present U.S. Representative Debbie Halvorson (center) with a plaque for her support of universal healthcare.

Bottom: Paul (right), pictured with his personal assistant Julie, enjoys living on his own. IVCIL assisted Paul with transitioning him from a nursing home to his own apartment.

Impact Center for Independent Living

2735 East Broadway
Alton, Illinois 62002

618-462-1411 (V)

618-474-5308 (TTY)

Serving: Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Bond

  • IMPACT reintegrated three people with disabilities into the community from nursing homes and other institutions through the Community Reintegration Program.
  • IMPACT reintegrated 12 people with disabilities into the community from nursing homes and other institutions through the Madison County Community Development Reintegration Stimulus Program.
  • IMPACT was able to build residential ramps and address accessibility issues for four consumers because of a stimulus project opportunity. The decision was made to focus on our rural county service area which includes Calhoun, Macoupin, Jersey, Bond and Greene counties. With each person who we worked with to build a ramp, we were able to address other needs the consumer would identify.

Photo Caption

Above: A consumer of IMPACT's Ramp and Home Modification Stimulus Program sits outside after finally gaining access due to his newly paved ramp.

Jacksonville Area Center for Independent Living

15 Permac Road
Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

217-245-8371 (V/TTY)

Serving: Mason, Scott, Cass, Morgan

  • Legislative and Voter Advocate Cyndy Benton received the Justin Dart Distinguished Citizen Award for her efforts with state and local policymakers, JACIL staff, consumers and the general community.
  • Five people with disabilities were able to move from nursing homes into their own homes.
  • A group which named themselves Friends Helping Friends was established by people with intellectual disabilities living in Cass County.
  • JACIL conducted a week-long celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, including an open house with a display of art by people with disabilities, visits to local and state policymakers, and a day of disability awareness activities for the community.
  • JACIL presented Yes Eye Can, a series of seminars on living independently with vision disabilities.

Photo Captions

Top: JACIL hosted the September

2010 Central Illinois Disability Advocacy Forum sponsored by a consortium of disability agencies. The forum was attended by a standing-room-only crowd.

Bottom: Legislative/Voter Advocate Cyndy Benton receives the Justin Dart Distinguished Citizen Award at the May 2010 CCDI Conference.

Lake County Center for Independent Living

377 North Seymour Avenue
Mundelein, Illinois 60060

847-949-4440 (V/TTY)

Serving: Lake

  • LCCIL transitioned eight consumers from nursing homes into the community.
  • LCCIL celebrated access as organizing and advocacy efforts came to fruition when The Northwest Demonstration Project and the Round Lake area Call N Ride programs began increasing transportation options in unserved/underserved Lake County.
  • LCCIL increased voter education and awareness of disability issues by hosting a successful education event as well as a candidates forum.
  • LCCIL expanded the Voyager Youth internship to include the spring, summer and fall. Youth learned key self-advocacy, project planning, and employment skills.
  • LCCIL created the self-directed IEP curriculum and taught it in two schools. Students led their own IEPs, exercising their leadership and self-advocacy skills.

Photo Captions

Top: LCCIL Candidates Forum Panel Three State Races.

Bottom: Legislative Interns

Living Independence For Everyone

2201 Eastland Drive
Suite #1
Bloomington, Illinois 61704

309-663-5433 (V)

309-663-0054 (TTY)

Serving: Dewitt, Ford, Livingston, McLean

  • Housing: LIFE Center advocated for housing authority accessibility and helped people obtain ramps and home mortgages.
  • Communication: A LIFE staff person chairs the Interpreter Licensure Board and leads statewide efforts to educate hospitals about accessible communication technology.
  • Transportation and Healthcare: LIFE Center advocates for accessible rural transportation and for mandated insurance coverage for hearing aids.
  • Education: LIFE Center teaches parents of students with disabilities how to advocate for their children's educational rights.
  • Community Reintegration: LIFE Center moved 6 people from nursing homes to their own homes.
  • Boards and Commissions: LIFE Center staff serve on 43 statewide, regional, county and community boards, planning committees and collaborative action groups, often in leadership roles. Two staff people were appointed by the Governor to statewide Boards and Commissions.

Photo Caption

Above: 2010 Legislative Intern class meets with Representative Dan Brady at the Capitol.

LINC Center for Independent Living

#1 Emerald Terrace, Suite 200
Swansea, Illinois 62226

618-235-9988 (V)

618-235-0451 (TTY)

Serving: St. Clair, Monroe, Randolph

  • Living Independently Now Center (LINC) has had many accomplishments that we are proud of. LINC experienced growth with the WorkLINC program that provides job related skills to transitional youth with disabilities ages 16-21. The program addresses a wide range of social, emotional and cognitive skills that assist youth in finding, attaining and keeping employment.
  • Advocacy efforts increased in multiple realms. LINC gained a seat on a National Transportation Committee and sent representation to Washington DC to take part in discussions regarding issues effecting people with disabilities nationwide.
  • LINC became an active participant in Illinois Imagines to address domestic violence against women with disabilities.

Photo Captions

Top: Consumer Tony Hill getting his H1N1 shot through our H1N1 clinics.

Bottom: LINC staff talking to a child about Sign Language at Family Fun Night that LINC sponsored, co-planned and participated in.

Northwestern Illinois Center for Independent Living

229 First Avenue
Suite #2
Rock Falls, Illinois 61071-1239

815-625-7860 (V)

815-625-7863 (TTY)

Serving: Carroll, Lee, Ogle, JoDaviess, Whiteside

  • NICIL's Community Reintegration Program successfully transitioned 7 people from nursing homes back into the community.
  • NICIL partnered with other community agencies to provide home modifications to 7 persons with disabilities.
  • NICIL hosted their 5th annual Walk-N-Roll disability awareness event, with over 100 participants.
  • NICIL's P.E.A.C.E. cross disability peer group has increased their numbers to over 40 members who meet on a monthly basis.
  • NICIL advocated for students with disabilities by participating in over 100 Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Photo Captions

Top: NICIL and local business sponsors work to increase disability awareness in our community during this year's Walk-N-Roll Celebration. A local business mascot also participated.

Bottom: The day after moving out of a nursing home, a consumer of NICIL's Community Reintegration Program enjoys his first breakfast in his own apartment.

Opportunities for Access

4206 Williamson Place
Suite 3
Mount Vernon, Illinois 62864

618-244-9212 (V)

618-244-9575 (TTY)

Serving: Clay, Clinton, Effingham, Fayette, Jasper, Jefferson, Marion, Washington, Wayne, White, Edwards, Hamilton, and Wabash

  • OFA CIL's Community Reintegration Program moved out nine consumers from nursing homes and advocated with them to regain their freedom.
  • OFA CIL partnered with other community organizations to secure funding for 63 home modifications and/or ramps to make the homes of people with disabilities more accessible.
  • OFA CIL continues to provide a third party service that enables DRS VR customers to obtain quick payment for necessary items to further their education, job search or employment opportunities.
  • OFA CIL continues its successful Social Security and Pharmaceutical Procurement Programs that help people with disabilities stay free of nursing homes and other institutions.
  • OFA CIL secured a DRS BBS grant allowing us to hold four Blind/visual impairment fairs, with helped 21 people to secure items to assist them with every day life.

Photo Caption

Above: Opportunities For Access's staff member Patty Tadlock at White County Health Fair. Patty passed away during the year from cancer, Patty we all miss you!

Options Center for Independent Living

22 Heritage Drive
Suite 107
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914

815-936-0100 (V)

815-936-0132 (TTY)

Serving: Kankakee, Iroquois,

  • Options developed a Reference Guide to Independence, a booklet offering staff-written articles useful for people with disabilities. Production was financed by ads from area businesses. This guide furnishes information on aspects of disability, has ads from businesses that specialize in the service or product mentioned in the article and has information about Options.
  • Options started a Facebook page for our youth with disabilities. This social medium appeals to them and several youth helped with the design. Job information and upcoming activities can get to the youth quickly.
  • Options reintegrated four consumers during this fiscal year.
  • Options assisted 26 consumers be approved for disability benefits.
  • Options conducted accessibility studies at 81 polling sites in Kankakee and Iroquois Counties.

Photo Captions

Top: Consumer Sherman Walters at a job shadow at the Kankakee Public Library.

Bottom: Gail Eick with one of her paintings after a CrossWalks for Disabilities Support Group Meeting. This meeting triggered Gail's love of painting and at a recent Artist's Walk in Kankakee, she sold some of her pieces for $100 each!

Persons Assuming Control of their Environment

1317 East Florida Ave. #27
Urbana, Illinois 61801

217-344-5433 (V)

217-344-5024 (TTY)

Serving: Champaign, Douglas, Edgar, Piatt, Vermilion

  • PACE assisted 6 nursing home residents move back into the community. Three first time homebuyers purchased a home and 31 since 2005. A selection center for ITAC, PACE distributed 100 FREE amplified phones.
  • PACE, Danville Public Library, and VIPIO Low Vision Support Group outreached to Vermilion County residents 55+ years losing their vision. PACE and Carle Low Vision Center cosponsored a Low Vision Fair. Speakers presented "New Developments in Retinal Diseases" and "Using White Canes". These events promote talking to peers and discovering techniques/technologies to adapt.
  • Urbana Assist Program high school students with disabilities come to PACE as a work site. Since the PACE staff is made up of many people with disabilities the students see working adult role models with disabilities.

Photo Captions

Top: Urbana Assist Program student working at PACE.

Bottom: Dr. Aashish Gandhi presenting at the East Central Illinois Low Vision Fair.

Progress Center for Independent Living

7521 Madison Street
Forest Park, Illinois 60130

708-209-1500 (V)

708-209-1827 (TTY)

Serving: Suburban Chicago

  • PCIL's Executive Director taught Basic Braille to 17 students, who were mostly parents of children who are blind or visually impaired.
  • World-renowned guitarist, Tony Melendez, performed to over 200 people at a fundraising event in south suburban Blue Island, Illinois. Melendez, who plays guitar using only his feet, dazzled the crowd for over two hours.
  • Eight people with disabilities were moved from area nursing homes into the community through PCIL's Community Reintegration Program.
  • PCIL's Personal Assistant team built a database of over 30 deaf/hard-of-hearing personal assistants ready for referral to people with disabilities using Home Services who communicate via sign language.
  • Through a collaboration with AgeOptions, PCIL provided benefits screenings to over 300 people with disabilities as one of 11 "Benefits Enrollment Centers" throughout suburban Cook County.

Photo Captions

Top: A host of over 100 consumers were in Blue Island for PCIL's Annual Meeting. It was the first time in over six years the event was held in the far south suburbs.

Bottom: 2010 marks the 7th consecutive year of PCIL's participation in the Disability Pride Parade.

Regional Access and Mobilization Project

202 Market Street
Rockford, Illinois 61107

815-968-7567 (V)

815-968-2401 (TTY)

Serving: Boone, Dekalb, Stephenson, Winnebago

  • RAMP assisted 900 people with disabilities to live independently.
  • RAMP served 200 Traumatic Brain Injury Consumers.
  • Youth Education Advocates assisted 313 children.
  • Over the past year RAMP logged 26,000 Community Service Hours while educating the community.
  • RAMP's 4 Wheel-A-Thon events raised a total net of $104,203.
  • Boone County RAMP presented the Teens 'N Transition program (T'NT) to 35 students in their school district. 91% of the students reported an increase in knowledge regarding the skills needed to obtain and maintain employment. The T'NT program prepares teenage students with disabilities for transition into adulthood.
  • RAMP reintegrated 14 people back into the community.
  • RAMP's first ever Bad Pants Open, a 9-hole golf scramble, raised a total net of $6,169.

Photo Captions

Top: Bill Moses, the participant who raised the most funds for the Boone County Wheel-A-Thon poses for a photo with his sons.

Bottom: RAMP's first ever Bad Pants Golf Scramble challenged golfers to try their hand at golfing from a wheelchair accessible golf cart.

Southern Illinois Center for Independent Living

2135 West Ramada Lane
Carbondale, Illinois 62901

618-457-3318 (V/TTY)

Serving: Franklin, Jackson, Perry, Williamson, Gallatin, Hardin, Saline

  • Ezra Reams, sponsored by SICIL, started a photography business. SICIL assisted Ezra purchase equipment (i.e. camera, backdrops, etc), becoming incorporated and learning how to prepare bills and pay taxes for the business. Ezra is a free lance photographer with his own business.
  • SICIL was contacted by an attorney representing Sylvia Webb who was about to be deported. Sylvia was care provider and wife of Gary who has spanuclear palsy and is unable to speak. Without direct testimony from Gary, his wife would be deported. SICIL worked with Gary using assisted speech devices and found one that Gary could use. Staff and the attorney worked with Gary to prepare his testimony convincing the judge of Sylvia's importance to Gary's health and independence.

Photo Captions

Top: Ezra Reams now owns and operates his own photography business in Southern Illinois.

Bottom: LaMontae Westley obtains his first position with McDonalds Corporation.

Soyland Access for Independent Living

2449 Federal Drive
Decatur, Illinois 62526

217-876-8888 (V/TTY)

Serving: Macon, Moultrie, Shelby, Cumberland, Clark, Coles

  • SAIL ADA Celebration featured consumers sharing their experiences of enhanced independence due to SAIL services.
  • SAIL participated in public transportation initiatives in the six county service area and assisted four reintegrated consumers through independent living skills.
  • SAIL Autism/Asperger's Support Group hosted art workshops for children 8 to 14 year olds to improve social skills.
  • SAIL hosted Medical Emergency Response Preparedness Workshops in Macon, Moultrie, Shelby and Coles Counties.
  • SAIL collaborated with the Decatur Breakfast Sertoma Club to provide 10 Pocket Talkers to consumers who are hard of hearing.
  • SAIL conducted 28 awareness activities reaching 1,817 community members with disability information.
  • SAIL gave 73 presentations to community organizations about SAIL programs and services.

Photo Captions

Top: Visitors to the SAIL 2010 ADA Celebration were introduced to the assistive technology available in the 3 demonstration and loan labs.

Bottom: The Ubi-Duo communication device equips consumers who are deaf and hard of hearing to interact directly with others.

Springfield Center for Independent Living

330 South Grand Avenue West
Springfield, Illinois 62704

217-523-2587 (V)

217-523-4032 (TTY)

Serving: Christian, Logan, Menard, Montgomery, Sangamon

  • SCIL's application for U.S. Department of Education American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Part C funds to provide direct services to the rural regions of our five county service area was approved.
  • Working in cooperation with the Division of Rehabilitation Services and School District 186, SCIL provided real work experience for four local students during FY 2010.
  • As a result of a contract between the Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living and the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), SCIL received funding to host two H1N1 flu vaccine clinics.
  • Thirteen consumers were reintegrated into the community from nursing homes: two utilizing Money Follows the Person and three via Rapid Reintegration Program.

Photo Caption

Above: In collaboration with the Illinois Department of Public Health, SCIL participated in a disability awareness presentation for medical students attending SIU School of Medicine in Springfield.

Stone-Hayes Center for Independent Living

39 North Prairie
Galesburg, Illinois 61401

309-344-1306(V/TTY)

Serving: Henderson, Knox, Warren

  • The last six months of the fiscal year have been a challenge but also an opportunity to live the mission of why CIL's are in existence.
  • Advocacy through TV, radio and newsprint interviews have proven the need for our Center is greater than ever.
  • Stone-Hayes CIL is now recognized within the communities we serve due to the dedication of the Executive Director and entire staff. This collaboration and networking have created greater opportunities such as employment, volunteerism, and full inclusion of the consumers we serve.

Photo Captions

Top: Over 2,000 individuals came through our office to attend the community event of Treat Street. The crowd wrapped around the city block waiting to come in.

Bottom: ADA celebration with keynote speakers. This event was also covered by the media.

West Central Illinois Center for Independent Living

300 Maine, Suite 104
Quincy, Illinois 62301

217-223-0400 (V)

217-223-0475 (TTY)

Serving: Adams, Pike, Brown, Schuyler, Hancock, McDonough

  • WCICIL for the second year conducted CPR Training for Personal Assistance giving our consumers more knowledgeable employees.
  • WCICIL increased Parent/Teacher IEP & IDEA workshops working toward improving advocacy.
  • Hancock County established a Public Transportation System providing accessible door to door service for people with disabilities in Hancock County, as well as other counties enabling people with disabilities to attend appointments, social activities, etc.
  • WCICIL's first Wheelchair Basketball Tournament brought education and awareness to all that participated in this event.
  • WCICIL successfully expanded our Computer Lab offering newer accessible hardware/software for education and training for people with disabilities.

Photo Captions

Top: Disability Awareness with the Ellington Elementary School.

Bottom: Wheelchair Basketball Tournament Fundraiser.

Will/Grundy Center for Independent Living

2415 A West Jefferson Street
Joliet, Illinois 60435

815-729-0162 (V)

815-729-2085 (TTY)

Serving: Will, Grundy

  • Eleven people with disabilities moved out of nursing facilities into their own residences.
  • Forty five students with disabilities took part in Disability Mentoring Day in October 2009.
  • Through advocacy efforts, Will-Grundy CIL successfully had an elevator repaired in the commuter rail station.
  • Will-Grundy CIL assisted a child with autism and he can now play and interact with his family members as a result of receiving an assistive technology device. Now his siblings purposely seek him out to jump, roll, and climb with him on his new bean bag/therapy chair.
  • A consumer advocated for himself and 40,000 other Illinoisans with disabilities at a rally where he spoke regarding Medicaid Managed Care. An important piece was added to two HMO contracts. Thus, policies will be sensitive to unique needs of people with disabilities.

Photo Caption

Above: David Cumbo practices his computer skills. Another consumer teaches David and others the various uses of computers including word processing, research information on the Internet, and more.

Overall Individual CIL Operational Funding Chart

CILS GRF VII B SSI VR 110 TOTALS PART C

GRANT

TOTAL

AL $311,999 $0 $63,198 $0 $375,197 $383,641 $758,838
AFA $224,575 $54,577 $22,550 $0 $301,702 $0 $301,702
DCIL $190,002 $0 $51,714 $0 $241,716 $0 $241,716
FITE $262,036 $35,676 $25,799 $0 $323,511 $0 $323,511
IICIL $87,838 $7,176 $33,772 $0 $128,786 $357,114 $485,900
IVCIL $283,010 $0 $0 $0 $283,010 $0 $283,010
IMPACT $306,233 $7,176 $23,063 $104,913 $441,385 $0 $441,385
JACIL $154,144 $0 $11,701 $0 $165,845 $137,512 $303,357
LCCIL $37,352 $7,176 $56,490 $0 $101,018 $261,710 $362,728
LIFE $183,520 $50,525 $51,554 $0 $285,599 $56,765 $342,364
LINC $168,270 $7,176 $65,305 $0 $240,751 $46,099 $286,850
NICIL $222,456 $43,177 $21,330 $0 $286,963 $0 $286,963
OFACIL $422,209 $7,176 $74,538 $0 $503,923 $132,760 $636,683
OPTIONS $98,196 $57,176 $10,250 $0 $165,622 $142,519 $308,141
PACE $201,270 $34,850 $21,054 $0 $257,174 $0 $257,174
PCIL $375,489 $7,176 $32,031 $0 $414,696 $0 $414,696
RAMP $158,466 $45,377 $36,243 $0 $240,086 $234,868 $474,954
SAIL $127,491 $0 $16,523 $0 $144,014 $250,189 $394,203
SCIL $290,594 $0 $33,322 $99,496 $423,412 $0 $423,412
SICIL $156,042 $85,050 $48,407 $0 $289,499 $132,056 $421,555
SHCIL $24,171 $0 $43,325 $0 $67,496 $236,081 $303,577
WCICIL $153,407 $7,176 $5,520 $0 $166,103 $101,158 $267,261
WGCIL $82,030 $7,176 $61,794 $0 $151,000 $257,284 $408,284
TOTAL  $4,520,800 $463,816  $809,483 $204,409 $5,998,508 $2,729,756 $8,728,264

AGE OF CONSUMERS RECEIVING DIRECT SERVICES

CIL Under 5 19-May 20-24 25-59 60 & Over Unknown Total
AL 1 55 63 401 100 0 620
AFA 0 4 6 64 14 0 88
DCIL 2 11 5 87 19 1 125
FITE 2 11 19 131 29 0 192
IICIL 0 7 10 144 129 0 290
IVCIL 4 47 8 52 12 0 123
IMPACT 4 34 25 184 238 0 485
JACIL 1 13 4 62 54 0 134
LCCIL 0 165 25 115 53 0 358
LIFE 0 7 20 113 114 1 255
LINC 9 155 11 116 73 1 365
NICIL 4 114 24 177 65 0 384
OFACIL 11 88 40 438 94 0 671
OPTIONS 2 34 21 153 103 0 313
PACE 0 18 16 190 231 0 455
PCIL 3 5 13 202 354 8 585
RAMP 32 285 34 422 141 0 914
SAIL 1 5 3 62 119 1 191
SCIL 1 24 20 102 34 0 181
SICIL 0 47 71 146 89 0 353
SHCIL 2 31 9 155 40 0 237
WCICIL 1 33 4 93 12 0 143
WGCIL 0 7 7 97 10 0 121
TOTAL 80 1,200 458 3,706 2,127 12 7,583
PERCENT  1%  16% 6%  49%  28%  0%  100%

DIRECT SERVICE BY MAJOR PRIMARY DISABILITY FY 2010

CIL COGNITIVE MENTAL PHYSICAL HEARING VISUAL MULTI-
DISABILITY
OTHER Total
AL 73 38 249 22 16 215 7 620
AFA 12 14 42 3 5 12 0 88
DCIL 4 7 50 17 6 41 0 125
FITE 10 32 88 36 6 20 0 192
IICIL 3 19 47 45 108 68 0 290
IVCIL 9 6 21 7 1 75 4 123
IMPACT 42 39 118 18 210 58 0 485
JACIL 3 9 11 14 60 34 3 134
LCCIL 108 50 31 10 47 112 0 358
LIFE 17 20 40 1 70 107 0 255
LINC 87 75 70 22 16 85 10 365
NICIL 65 19 113 2 4 174 7 384
OFACIL 41 25 74 4 14 510 3 671
OPTIONS 42 21 79 6 82 72 11 313
PACE 16 9 19 39 59 291 22 455
PCIL 13 34 77 386 6 61 8 585
RAMP 202 83 185 31 7 403 3 914
SAIL 5 8 28 6 68 74 2 191
SCIL 38 18 50 3 5 60 7 181
SICIL 119 53 49 16 82 33 1 353
SHCIL 67 25 84 8 5 48 0 237
WCICIL 27 7 56 1 4 47 1 143
WGCIL 14 45 28 6 6 20 2 121
TOTAL 1,017 656 1,609 703 887 2,620 91 7,583
PERCENT 13% 9% 21% 9% 12% 35% 1% 100%

CONSUMERS RECEIVING I & R AND DIRECT SERVICES

CIL NUMBER OF
I & R RESPONSES
NUMBER OF
CONSUMERS SERVED DIRECT SERVICES
NUMBER OF
MALES SERVED DIRECT SERVICES
NUMBER OF
FEMALES SERVED DIRECT SERVICES
AL 7,844 620 267 353
AFA 4,107 88 32 56
DCIL 572 125 62 63
FITE 1,785 192 99 93
IICIL 9,501 290 114 176
IVCIL 733 123 78 45
IMPACT 2,898 485 188 297
JACIL 1,297 134 57 77
LCCIL 1,192 358 178 180
LIFE 4,200 255 95 160
LINC 1,870 365 186 179
NICIL 1,034 384 193 191
OFACIL 1,523 671 338 333
OPTIONS 1,628 313 125 188
PACE 3,420 455 150 305
PCIL 1,226 585 286 299
RAMP 3,967 914 519 395
SAIL 2,250 191 70 121
SCIL 1,441 181 90 91
SICIL 604 353 186 167
SHCIL 303 237 112 125
WCICIL 706 143 61 82
WGCIL 2,235 121 71 50\
TOTAL 56,336 7,583 3,557 4,026

COUNTY COVERAGE FY 2010

CIL NO. COUNTIES SERVED NO. SERVED HOME COUNTY NO. SERVED OUTLYING COUNTIES TOTAL PERCENT HOME PERCENT OUTLYING
AL Chicago 615 5 620 99% 1%
AFA 4 62 26 88 70% 30%
DCIL 1 114 11 125 91% 9%
FITE 3 160 32 192 83% 17%
IICIL 3 247 43 290 85% 15%
IVCIL 5 82 41 123 67% 33%
IMPACT 6 362 123 485 75% 25%
JACIL 4 97 37 134 72% 28%
LCCIL 1 344 14 358 96% 4%
LIFE 4 151 104 255 59% 41%
LINC 3 299 66 365 82% 18%
NICIL 5 191 193 384 50% 50%
OFACIL 13 157 514 671 23% 77%
OPTIONS 2 223 90 313 71% 29%
PACE 5 322 133 455 71% 29%
PCIL 1 565 20 585 97% 3%
RAMP 4 382 532 914 42% 58%
SAIL 6 109 82 191 57% 43%
SCIL 5 161 20 181 89% 11%
SICIL 7 100 253 353 28% 72%
SHCIL 3 171 66 237 72% 28%
WCICIL 6 84 59 143 59% 41%
WGCIL 2 104 17 121 86% 14%
TOTAL 93 5,102 2,481 7,583 71% 29%

ETHNICITY OF CONSUMERS RECEIVING DIRECT SERVICE IN FY 2010

CIL American Indian Asian African American Hispanic Native Hawaiian White Other Total
AL 0 5 437 57 2 110 9 620
AFA 1 0 22 2 0 62 1 88
DCIL 1 1 14 5 0 104 0 125
FITE 1 4 40 70 0 75 2 192
IICIL 0 1 62 10 0 215 2 290
IVCIL 0 0 4 8 0 111 0 123
IMPACT 4 5 46 4 0 417 9 485
JACIL 1 0 4 1 0 127 1 134
LCCIL 0 10 64 35 0 240 9 358
LIFE 3 0 20 2 0 229 1 255
LINC 0 2 132 3 0 228 0 365
NICIL 2 0 8 41 0 322 11 384
OFACIL 6 3 34 2 2 619 5 671
OPTIONS 0 0 44 8 0 259 2 313
PACE 1 3 82 3 0 366 0 455
PCIL 3 8 107 68 1 398 0 585
RAMP 2 14 156 54 3 673 12 914
SAIL 0 2 15 1 0 173 0 191
SCIL 1 0 51 1 0 124 4 181
SICIL 1 0 61 1 0 290 0 353
SHCIL 0 2 16 2 0 217 0 237
WCICIL 1 0 9 1 0 126 6 143
WGCIL 0 0 36 7 1 75 2 121
TOTAL 28 60 1,464 386 9 5,560 76 7,583
PERCENT 0.40% 0.80% 19% 5% 0% 73% 1% 100%

OVER ALL CONSUMER INVOLVEMENT

CIL Persons with Disabilities on Board of Directors Persons with Disabilities on Administrative Staff Persons with Disabilities on Program Staff
Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
AL 18 64% 8 73% 22 59%
AFA 9 75% 2 67% 3 60%
DCIL 9 90% 2 67% 5 83%
FITE 8 100% 5 100% 3 60%
IICIL 7 64% 8 73% 8 73%
IVCIL 9 82% 2 100% 4 80%
IMPACT 7 58% 3 100% 8 67%
JACIL 7 54% 2 67% 9 75%
LCCIL 8 89% 4 100% 7 88%
LIFE 10 67% 3 100% 5 63%
LINC 8 57% 2 67% 8 80%
NICIL 6 75% 2 100% 4 67%
OFACIL 3 100% 1 100% 6 50%
OPTIONS 7 64% 2 100% 6 60%
PACE 11 100% 2 100% 10 100%
PCIL 8 73% 4 50% 8 62%
RAMP 6 55% 4 50% 12 52%
SAIL 8 80% 1 100% 15 100%
SCIL 12 75% 3 100% 7 70%
SICIL 6 86% 5 56% 13 57%
SHCIL 7 70% 2 100% 7 88%
WCICIL 5 63% 2 50% 2 50%
WGCIL 9 53% 2 67% 6 60%
AVERAGE 8 74% 3 82% 8 72%

Illinois Department of Human Services
401 South Clinton Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607

100 South Grand Avenue, East, Springfield, Illinois 62762

www.dhs.state.il.us

Programs, activities and employment opportunities in the Illinois Department of Human Services are open and accessible to any individual or group without regard to age, sex, race, sexual orientation, disability, ethnic origin or religion. The department is an equal opportunity employer and practices affirmative action and reasonable accommodation programs.

Printed by the Authority of the State of Illinois. (03/11)